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If I 




THE EXHIBITION 



EMPIRE OF JAPAN 



OFFICIAL 
CATALOGUE 



INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION 

ST. LOUIS, 1904 



KArvAPD rOLLECE LIBHAHY 

GIFT OF 
EBNEST GOODBICH STILLMAI 

TrtANSFERRED TO 
FOGG ART MUSEUll 

FOGG MUSEUM LIBRARY 
HARVARD UNIVERSITY 



PRESS OF 
WOODWARD A TIERNAN PRINTING CO. 
ST. LOUIS, U. S. A. 



The Imperial Ordinance for the Organization of the 
Imperial Japanese Commission to the Louisiana 

Purchase Exposition. 



(Issued July 10, 1903.) 



Article I. The Imperial Commission to the Louisiana Purchase 
Exposition shall be under the supervision of the Minister of State for 
Agriculture and Commerce, and shall deal with all the matters relating 
to the participation of the Japanese Empire in the Louisiana Purchase 
Exposition, to be held at the City of St. Louis, in the State of Missouri, 
the United States of America, in the year I9O4. 

ARTICLE II. The Imperial Commission shall consist of the follow- 
ing officials: 

President. 

Vice-President. 
Commissioner-General . 
Commissioners. 
Jurors of Fine Arts. 
Clerks. 

ARTICLE 111. The Minister of State for Agriculture and Com- 
merce shall be ex-officio the President of the Imperial Commission. 

The President of the Imperial Commission shall enjoy the privi- 
lege due to his position as the Minister of Agriculture and Commerce. 

The Vice-President, Commissioner-General, Commissioners and 
Jurors of Fine Arts shall be appointed from among officials or persons 
of special erudition or experience. 

The Vice-President and Commissioner-General shall enjoy the 
prerogative corresponding to that of the official of the Cbokunin rank ; 
Commissioners and Jurors of Fine Arts shall enjoy the prerogative 
corresponding to that of the official of the Sonin rank; Commissioners 
or Jurors of Fine Arts who belong to the Cbokunin rank, or are treated 
as Chokunin officials, shall enjoy the privilege corresponding to that of 
the Cbokunin official. 

The Clerks shall be appointed from among the officials of the 
Hannin rank or persons who hold no official position. 

The Clerks shall enjoy the privilege corresponding to that of the 
official of the Hannin rank. 

• • • 

111 



Article IV. The imperial Commission shall have the authority 
of electing Counsellor or. Counsellors from among persons of special 
erudition or experience in order to carry on special investigations, if 
necessary. 

ARTICLE V. The Cabinet of Ministers shall, by the recommen- 
dation of the Minister of Agriculture and Commerce, appoint the Vice- 
President, Commissioner-General, Commissioners, Jurors of Fine Arts 
and Counsellors of the said Commission. 

The President shall appoint the Clerks of the said Commission. 

ARTICLE VI. The President shall supervise the officials of the 
said Commission and all the matters relating to the same. 

ARTICLE VII. The President shall, as he sees fit, issue various 
regulations and address orders or instructions to local governors in 
regard to the txposition. 

ARTICLE VIII. The Vice-President shall assist the President, and, 
in case of necessity, assume the function of the President, pro tempore, 

ARTICLE IX. The Commissioner-General shall execute his duty 
in accord with the direction of the President or Vice-President. 

Article X. The Commissioners shall execute their respective 
duties in conformance with the direction of the President, Vice-Presi- 
dent or Commissioner-General. 

Article XL The Jurors of Fine Arts shall execute their respect- 
ive duties in connection with the examination of art exhibits in accord 
with the direction of the President, Vice-President or Commissioner- 
General. 

Article XII. The Clerks shall execute their respective duties 
according to the instructions of their superiors. 



IV 



Officials of the Imperial Japanese Commission. 

BARON KEIGO KIYOURA, Minister of State for 
Agriculture and Commerce, First Grade of the 
Third Rank of Honor, Second Order of Merit . PRESIDENT. 

BARON MASANAWO MATSUDAIRA, Member of 
the House of Peers, First Grade of the Third 
Rank of Honor, First Order of Merit VICE- PRESIDENT. 

SHIICHI TEGIMA, President of the Tokyo Higher 
Techmlogical ScJtool, Second Grade of the 
Fourth Rank of Honor, Third Order of Merit , Com. General. 

HAJIME OTA, Counsellor of the Depjrtment of Agri- 
culture and Commerce, Second Grade oj the Fifth 
Rank of Honor, Sixth Order of Merit , , . .COMMISSIONER. 

MASAHARU ISOBE, Secretary^ of the Department of 
Agriculture and Commerce, Second Grade of the 
Fifth Rank of Honor, Sixth Order of Merit , , COMMISSIONER. 

HARUKl YAMAWAKl, Secretary^ of the T>epartment 
of Agriculture and Commerce, Secofid Grade 
of the Sixth Rank of Honor, Sixth Order of 
Merit COMMISSIONER. 

YhlTARO OKAMOTO, Secretary of the Department 
of Agriculture and Commerce, Second Grade- of 
the Sixth Rank of Honor, COMMISSIONER.. 

MINORU OKA, Counsellor of the Department of Agri- 
culture and Commerce, Second Grade of the 
Sixth Ra7ik oJ Honor COMMISSIONER. 

MASANAWO HANIHARA, Third Secretary of the 
Japanese Legation at IVashington, D. C, First 
Grade of Seventh Rank of Honor, Sixth Order 
of Merit COMMISSIONER. 

HIROMICHI SHUGYO, Technical Expert of the 
Local Government of Hiroshima-ken, First Grade 
of the Seventh Rank of Hotwr, Sixth Order of 
Merit COMMISSIONER. 

USHITaRO BEPPU, judge of the Bureau of Patents, 

First Grade of the Seventh Rank of Honor, . . COMMISSIONER. 

NAWOZO KANZAKI COMMISSIONER. 

Attaches. 

ICHIKAWA YUKIWO, Sxo^id Grade of the Seventh %ank of Honor, 

Superintendent of the Imperial Household Garden, 
NIWA KEISUKE, Ex-Member of the House of Representatives, 

V 



PREFACE. 

IN presenting to the public the official catalogue of 
the Japanese Exhibits at the Louisiana Purchase 
Exposition, the Japanese Commission takes the 
pleasure of stating that the catalogue has been intended 
to give not merely an actual enumeration of the 
articles on exhibition, but also to sfet forth a somewhat 
comprehensive idea of the existing conditions of the 
Japanese Empire, with special reference to her com- 
merce and industry. The Cortimission, as well as the 
Department of Agriculture and Commerce, shall deem 
it a privilege to respond to any inquiry from foreigners 
about the products and manufactures, and the general 
economic conditions, of Japan, which they are anxious 
to introduce more fully to foreign traders and peoples 
in general. 



vu 



I 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

The Imperial Ordinance for the Organization of the Imperial 

Japanese Commission to the Louisiana Purchase Exposition . . iii 

Officers of the Imperial Japanese Commission v 

Preface vii 

FOREWORD 3 

Part I — Preliminary Remarks. 

1. Geographical Features 9 

2. Population I2 

3. Political Conditions 14 

4. Religion 17 

5. Financial Conditions 18 

6. Currency System 21 

7. Bank and Credit 23 

8. Insurance 25 

9. Savings System 26 

10. Foreign Trade 2^ 

Part II. — Japanese Exhibits m Various Departments. 

1. Department of Education 

Introductory Remarks 35 

Exhibits 36 

2. Department of Art 

Introductory Remarks 48 

Exhibits 54 

3. Department of Liberal Arts 

Introductory Remarks 64 

Exhibits 67 

4. Department of Manufactures 

Introductory Remarks 77 

Exhibits 84 

5. Department of Machinery 

Exhibits 182 

6. Department of Electricity 

Exhibits 183 

7. Department of Transportation 

Introductory Remarks 184 

Exhibits 191 



IX 



Part II. — Japanese Exhibits in Various Departments — Continued. 

8. Department of A^iriculture 

Introductoiy Remarks . . ; 195 

Formosa (appe?idix) 202 

Exhibits 204 

9. Department of Horticulture 

Introductory Remarks 221 

Exhibits 223 

10. Department of Forestry 

Introductory Rnnarks 225 

Exhibits . 230 

11. Department of Mines and Metallurgy 

Introductory Remarks 247 

Exhibits 251 

12. Department of Fish and Game 

Introductory Remarks 264 

Exhibits 275 

13. Department of Anthropology 

Exhibits 27S 

14. Department of Social Economy 

Exhibits 279 

15. Department of Physical Culture 

Exhibits 281 

APPENDIX. 

Weights and Measures 285 



List of Illustrations. 



1. Plan of the Exposition Grounds, shovvintz the location PAGE 

of Japanese Exhibits FACING i 

2. Entrance to the Japanese Pavilion ** 6 

3. Japanese Section in the Palace of Education .... ** 32 

4. Japanese Section in the Palace of Fine Arts .... ** 48 

5. Entrance to the Japanese Section in the Palace of 

Varied Industries ** 76 

6. Japanese Section in the Palace of Manufactures . . . ** 84 

7. Japanese Section in the Palace of Electricity .... " 182 

8. Japanese Section in the Palace of Transportation . . ** 184 

9. Japanese Section in the Palace of Agriculture ... '* 195 

10. Formosan Exhibits in the Palace of Agriculture ... " 202 

11. Japanese Garden Art *' 220 

12. Forestry Exhibits of Japan in the Palace of Forestry, 

Fish and Game *' 224 

13. Japanese Section in the Palace of Mines and Metal- 

lurgy *' 246 

14. Fishery Exhibits of Japan in the Palace of Forestry, 

Fish and Game '* 264 

15. Exhibits of the Police Association of Japan *' 276 

16. Exhibits of the Imperial Institute of Infectious Disease ** 276 

17. Exhibits of the Red Cross Society of Japan .... *' 276 



ZI 



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RLEl 



»f Japan. 





FOREWORD 




FOREWORD. 



BEGINNING with the International Exposition, held at Vienna in 
1873, and including the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, noW 
open at St. Louis, Japan has already participated in twenty- 
seven World's Fairs. Her participation in the present Exposition at St. 
Louis is more memorable in more than one respect than what she did 
at any preceding Exposition. In the first place, she has never before 
occupied such an extensive area of space for her exhibits as she does 
at the present occasion. It is twice and three times as large as that 
occupied by Japan at the Chicago World's Fair of 1893, and that at the 
Paris Exposition of 1900, respectively. And in each department, where 
Japan takes any part at the present Fair, her location is almost ideal. 
Secondly, the remarkable industrial progress of Japan in recent years, 
coupled with an increasingly wider dissemination of technical knowl- 
edge and a greater completion of educational institutions, has brought 
about a significant advancement in the quality and volume of our 
products and manufactures — a fact which has been fully proved by the 
extensive, varied and superior nature of our exhibits at the present 
Fair. The enthusiasm of manufacturers and traders in their desire of 
participating in the Exposition has been so intense that in spite of the 
determined effort of the Government to discriminate between numerous 
applicants, the quantity of exhibits has been swelled to such an extent 
that, extensive as was the space allowed Japan, it has been a matter 
of no small difficulty to find places for all the articles sent in for exliibi- 
tion. In the third place, notwithstanding the fact that since the Gov- 
ernment decided to present a national exhibit, there was only a short 
period of nine months until the opening of the Fair, and that in the 
course of that comparatively short period the rupture of friendly rela- 
tions between Russia and Japan greatly handicapped our endeavor con- 
cerning the Exposition, the officials in charge and exhibitors worked in 
unison, pursuing their pre-conceived plan without a slight interruption. 
In view of such disadvantages which we had to combat, the promptness 
and accuracy with which articles after articles were brought in to their 
destination, and arranged and displayed seasonably in proper form, 
might well be regarded as remarkable. The result was that by the 
time the gates of the great Fair were thrown open to the public our 
displays had been well-nigh completed, to the gratification of the Expo- 
sition Company and the American people at large. 



4 Japanese ExmnrrioN, 

These, indeed, are a few of many important features attendant 
upon the participation of Japan in the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. 

Owing to the fact that when Japan was first invited to take part 
in the present Exposition she was busily engaged in preparing for the 
Fifth National Exhibition held in the city of Osaka in the last year, she 
had to reluctantly decline to accept the invitation. As the inauguration 
of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition was thereafter postponed a year, 
fixing its date at the first day of May, 1904, Japan was enabled to 
accept the invitation. Early in the year 1903 our Imperial Government 
sent a corps of officials to St. Louis for the purpose of selecting a suita- 
ble location for our Government buildings, and for applying for neces- 
sary spaces in various departments of the Exposition. Due to the 
seasonable and prompt attention of our Government, as well as the 
courtesy of the managers of the Exposition, every desired arrangement 
was accomplished without the slightest difficulty. Then a bill for appro- 
priating a sum of $400,000, to be expended for the Exposition, was 
passed by both Houses of the Legislature, and in July, 1903, the Gov- 
ernment formally notified the Exposition Company at St. Louis that 
Japan would be represented at the Fair, commencing at the same time 
to prepare for the memorable event. 

The Japanese Commission for the Exposition has taken great care 
not to accept for exhibition those articles which have mere virtue of 
novelty, without much practical value, or such articles as can not be 
produced in a large volume. The idea of the Government in- employing 
such discrimination was to so plan our exhibition that it will leave some 
lasting eflFects after the Exposition upon the world's trade and com- 
merce. The exhibition of matters relating to education was executed 
under the direct supervision of the Department of Education, and was 
so planned as to make it represent a complete system of education now 
in vogue in Japan. In regard to exhibitions concerning mines, fish, 
forestry, agriculture, and garden arts, the Department of Agriculture 
and Commerce maintained the authority of deciding who should be 
allowed to make exhibition, or what articles should be accepted. The 
arrangement of articles exhibited in various departments of the Exposi- 
tion was made in this wise — namely, those independent of the Japan 
Exhibits Association were arranged by individual exhibitors under the 
supervision of the Japanese Commission, while others were set out in 
proper order by the said Association. 

There is no department or palace in which Japan's exhibition is 
not found. Displays on an especially elaborate scale, however, can be 
found in the following eleven palaces — namely. Palaces of Education 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 5 

and Social Economy, Fine Arts, Liberal Arts, Manufactures, Varied 
Industries, Transportation, Mines, Forestry, Fish and Game, Electricity 
and Agriculture. The total area of space of the Japanese sections in 
these departments is approximately estimated at 129,457 square feet, 
which is distributed among different sections as follows: 

Sq. Ft. 

In the Palace of Education 6,299 

In the Palace of Fine Arts 6,825 

In the Palace of Liberal Arts 400 

In the Palace of Industry 27,584 

In the Palace of Manufactures 54»737 

In the Palace of Transportation 14,160 

In the Palace of Electricity 1,100 

In the Palace of Mines 6,903 

In the Palace of Forestry, Fish and Game 2,982 

In the Palace of Agriculture 8,667 

Total 129,457 

Besides the above areas in the various departments, a splendid 
garden of a genuine Japanese style covers an extensive space of ground 
in which stand the Government building, and attached to it a reception 
hall and several other artistic mansions. Superb displays of Japanese 
garden and floricultural arts can be seen in this garden. In the recep- 
tion hall just mentioned there are exhibited various data showing the 
growth and present status of the Red Cross Society of Japan. Alto- 
gether the dimension of space taken by Japan aggregates 148,361 
square feet in an approximate estimation. 

Inasmuch as the unique nature of the Japanese garden may well 
be considered one of the attractive features of the Fair, it mav not be 
out of place to describe it briefly : 

.Spreading over an area of some 15,000 square feet, occupying a 
superb location on an eminence, the garden is situated a short distance 
south of the Palace of ^Machinery and the motor house, and near the 
Ferris Wheel in the west. With a grove of evergreens adjoining the 
east and south sides, and bordering on a broad thoroughfare at the 
front, the situation of the garden is almost ideal. Artistically scattered 
within the precinct of the garden are the Reception Hall, the office 
building, the Formosa Tea House, the Kinkaku Tea House, and several 
cottages and a bazaar. Hills and waterfalls, ponds and bridges, all 
presented in miniature scales exquisitely tasteful, and the verdant 
lawns studded with fascinating flowers of different colors, these are 
all harmonized into an artistic unit in unique landscape gardening. 
Beautifully trained dwarf trees, so old, yet so small, were brought from 



6 Japanese Exhibition, 

Japan for the special purpose of ornamenting the garden. The droop- 
ing wistaria and gay peony, the scented lily and blushing maple are all 
thriving, eager to rival the beauty of each other in the season of their 
glory. 

The building materials for the Reception Hall, the office building 
and resting cottages have been brought all the way from Japan. The 
Reception Hall was built entirely by native carpenters, after the style 
of a Daimyo's Gotcn (palace of feudal lord) of some six hundred years 
ago. The architectural style of the building is what is termed Hcikc, 
a style prevailing at the time when a military family called the Heike 
held a paramount power. The artistically curved roofs, projecting one 
upon another with majestic air, producing symmetry without, at the 
same time, losing a solid appearance of the structure, are but a modest 
representation of architectural accomplishment already attained in 
Japan several centuries ago. Hanging on the inner wall of the Hall is 
the portrait of Her Majesty, the Empress of Japan, and occupying a 
section of the room are the exhibits of the Red Cross Society of Japan, 
in which the Empress takes a keen interest. There are also exhibited 
human images, showing a series of historical changes in customs and 
costumes from ancient to modem times. 

The resting cottage is constructed with lumber of varied kinds. 
It was modeled after a cottage in Sho gun's (military Magistrate's) 
garden, which was common in the Tokugawa period, two or three 
centuries ago. 

Another structure close to the south bank of the lake is a small 
reproduction of the Kinkakn Temple, which was built in Kyoto, the 
Athens of Japan, by a military ruler of the Ashikaga family five him- 
drcd years ago. Close to the right of the front gate of the garden 
stands the Formosa mansion, a fair representation of characteristic 
native dwellings. 

The Kinkakn Temple was built under the auspices of the Japan 
Tea Traders' Association, and the Formosa mansion bv the initiative 
of the Formosa Government. In the former building the green Japa- 
nese tea will be served, while in the latter the Formosa tea can be had. 
This arrangement has been made as a means of promoting Japan^s tea 
trade in foreign countries. 



J 



PART I 



PART I. 



PRELIMINARY REMARKS. 



• 



CHAPTER 1. 

4 

Geographical Features of Japan. 

Situated in the Far Eastern waters of the Pacific and not verv 
distant from the Eastern shores of the Continent of Asia, the Empire 
of Japan consists of numerous islands, scattered over a wide area of 
waters, beginning with 1 19^20' E. L., Greenwich, on the west, and 
ending with 156° 32' E. L., Greenwich, on the east, and spreading 
between 50^56' N. L., and 21 ^48' N. L., on the north and south; 
respectively. The long series of the islands running from north to- 
south forms one continuous chafn, making a comparatively narrow 
breadth from east to west. Hence, the shape of the country is often 
compared to the figure of a fabulous dragon stretching to its full length 
with its head erect. Across the Strait of Chishima (the Kuriles), the 
North Sea (the Sea of Okhotsk), and the Strait of Soya, the Insular 
Empire looks on the north towards Russian Siberia. The western 
coast of the Empire faces Siberia, Korea and China; across the Sea of 
Japan, the Strait of Korea, the Yellow Sea, and the Strait of Formosa, 
To the south, separated by the Strait of Roshi, there lie the Philippines. 
The number of islands constituting the lunpire is estimated at about 
four thousand, of which the largest are Honshu, Hokkaido, Kushu, 
Formosa and w^hikoku. The areas of these principal islands, together 
whh minor islands belonging to each one of them except Shikoku, and 
of other islands, are respectively as follows : 

Honshu and group ^4.57i ri. 

Hokkaido and group Sfi6i ri. 

Kushu and group 2.617 ri. 

Formosa and group -.-259 ri. 

Shikoku ; 1.180 ri. 

Other Islands 1.409 ri. 

Total 27, 100 ri. 

As the country is surrounded by waters, its coast line is as long 
as 9,000 miles — a length greater than that of any other country in the 



lo Japanese Exhibition, 

world. Commensurate to the length of the coast line, the country 
abounds in excellent ports and harbors. Facing the Pacific Ocean, the 
southeastern part of the main islands, comprising Hokkaido, Honshu, 
Shikoku and Kushu, and the groups of minor islands belonging to them, 
abounds in mesozoic groups of rocks composed of various systems, but 
is comparatively destitute of eruptic rocks. On the other hand, in tlie 
northwestern part of the main islands along the shores of the Sea of 
Japan, arc found more complicated systems of old volcanic and neo- 
volcanic rocks. Along the line of intercourse between these two differ- 
ent groups of sedimentary rocks, mesozoic and eruptic, there are 
numerous volcanoes, dormant and active. Intersecting the country in 
almost every direction there are not less than ten mountain ranges, 
resulting in the most diversified features of topography. As the vol- 
canic mountain range is as abundant as the paleozoic, Japan is most 
lavishly bestowed with hot springs. Although the country is traversed 
by such numerous chains of mountain, the area of really uninhabitable 
mountain regions is comparatively small, as the mountain ranges are 
not very thick, the main portion of the country being elevated plains, 
while nearly one-seventh of the whole area forms lower plains. Most 
of such plains are found in mountain or river valleys or on mountain 
slopes. The Ishikari valley in Hokkaido and the Kwanto plain are 
among the most noted of such plains. 

Owing to the diversified topographical feature, the streams and 
rivers of Japan flow in almost every direction — to the Pacific, the Sea 
of Japan, the Inland Sea of Sedo, and so forth. As the slopes or plains 
facing the Pacific are the most extensive, the rivers in those regions 
glide down toward the ocean, giving much facility in transportation. 
On the opposite side of the country the plain is greatly narrower in 
breadth ; yet it is not entirely destitute of long streams. Of rivers flow- 
ing in other directions only a very few can be classified among great 
rivers. 

As to the climate of the Empire the temperature is somewhat lower 
than that of other countries on the same latitude. Although the warm 
Black Current washes the southern shores of the countrv, the eastward 
movement of the atmosphere from the cold region of Siberia and a cold 
ocean current flowing in southerly direction from near the shores of the 
Kuriles furnish a powerful influence to reduce the warmth generated 
by the Kuroshiwo (Black Current), As the territory of the Empire 
stretches extensively from south to north, and abounds in mountains, 
its climate differs according to localities. The average temperature in 
the island of Formosa is 21° to 25°. Even in warm summer the ther- 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 11 

mometer in Formosa hardly rises as high as 37°, while in winter it 
rarel\"goes below 3°, although high peaks of mountains are frequently 
decorated with snow. Coming to Kushu and Shikoku, we find that the 
summer temperature there often reaches to what is considered the 
highest point in Japan, but in winter the weather is rather mild, the 
transition from the summer to the winter weather being gradual, but 
not radical. Along the southern and eastern shores of Honshu, which 
undergoes the influence of the Black Current, the difference between 
the warmest and the coldest weather is not very wide. On the con- 
trary, regions bordering on the Sea of Japan, as well as the north- 
eastern part of Honshu, washed by the cold current "from the north, are 
generally colder ; while in those central valleys, circumscribed by liigh 
mountains, the temperature is still lower. As regards Hokkaido, its 
shorter distance from Siberia and its situation in the further North 
assist in maintaining a considerably lower temperature. 

The volume of rainfalls in the Empire is generally large. The 
highest record is found in the southwestern islands, and in districts near 
the Cape of Ushiwo. In the southeastern part of Formosa, the south- 
em part of Shikoku, the island of Chishima, the northern coast of the 
middle part of Honshu, the rain gauge records a height next to that 
in those regions above mentioned. The northern part of "the high 
plains in middle Honshu and the northern coast of Hokkaido are of the 
lowest record. Generally speaking, the volume of rainfalls is greater 
in summer than in winter. Except in the southeastern islands, there is 
hardly a place where there are not snowfalls in a greater or lesser 
volume. Yet, on account of dry atmosphere in winter, the snowfall is 
comparatively infrequent and of small volume, except in the district 
bounded by the Sea of Japan, which sends wet atmosphere landward, 
resulting in frequent and heavy snowfalls. 



12 Japanese Exhibition, 



CHAPTER TI. 

POPUI.VTIOX. 

Japanese Races. — The problem of the origin of the Japanese people 
is a mooted one, which still remains unsolved. It is, however, almost 
certain that it is the outcome of the admixture of several different races 
not widely different from each other. What we call the Yamato race, 
which forms by far the greatest and most important portion of the 
inhabitants of the Insular Empire, is, in all probability, not of one un- 
mixed blood. Almost the whole portion of the main islands constituting 
Japan proper is peopled by this race. In Formosa, however, principal 
inhabitants are Chinese alongside a considerable number of the abori- 
gines. Hokkaido was originally inhabited by the Ainus, whose power 

was once overwhelming in the northern part of Honshu as well. But 

» 

their number has been and still is decreasing like the American Indians, 
and they now occupy a comparatively small portion of Hokkaido. 

• 

Total Number of Population. — The population of the Japanese 
Empire has been steadily increasing. The following table shows the 
rate of increase of population in Japan proper (not including Formosa) 
diiring the six years from 1895 to 1900 inclusive : 

Year. Male. 

1895 21.345.750 

1896 21,561,023 

1897 .• 21,823,651 

1898 22.073,896 

1899 22,329,925 

1900 22,608,150 

As a result of the Japan-China war of 1894-95, China ceded to 

Japan the Island of Formosa, as well as the group of Pescadores, with 

the following population : 

^ Total No. of people 

Vear. Population. from Japan proper. 

1897 2,797,543 16,321 

1898 2.690,096 25,585 

1899 2.758.161 33.120 







Per cent of • 


Female. 


Total. Annual Increase. 


20.924,870 


42,270,620 


1.09 


21,167,241 


42.708,264 


1.04 


21,405.212 


43,228,863 


1.22 


21.689,257 


43.763.153 


1.24 


21.930,681 


44,260.604 


1. 14 


22,197.806 


44,»D5.937 


1.23 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 13 

Density of Population, — According to the census compiled in 1898 
the total area of Japan (Formosa excluded) is estimated at 147,655 
square miles, the density of population being as follows : 

Population per 

Square miles. Population. Square miles. 

Central Honshu 36,600 16,859,296 461 

Northern Honshu 30,204 6,642,917 220 

Western Honshu 20,681 9,828,722 475 

Shikoku 7,031 3»oi3,8i7 429 

Hokkaido 36,299 610,155 ^7 

Kushu 16.840 6,81 1,246 404 

Total 147,655 43.763,153 296 

As regards the rates of births, deaths and marriages of Japanese 
'both at home and abroad during the five years from 1896 to 1900 
inclusive, the following statistics is given: 

Excess of 

Year. Marriages. Births. Deaths. Births. 

^896 501,777 1,282,178 912,822 369,356 

1897 .^65,207 1,335,125 876,837 458,288 

1898 471,298 1,369,622 894,503 475,119 

1899 297,428 1,388,185 934,596 455,619 

1900 345,158 1,406,624 909,095 497,529 

Japanese in Foreign Countries. — The number of Japanese staying 
abroad at the end of the year 1902 stood at 139,553, of whom 97,404 
were in the United States of America and her colonies, 22,471 in Korea, 
8,592 in Great Britain and British colonies, and 4,716 in Russia and her 
colonial territories. 

Foreigners in Japan. — The number of foreigners coming to Japan 
has been steadily increasing since the doors of Japan were first open for 
the international communication. At the end of the year 1902 foreign 
residents in Japan were 14,257 in number, which is classified according 
to nationality, as follows : 

Nationality. Total No. 

China 8,027 

England 2,215 

America 1,624 

Germany 647 

France 505 

Portugal 169 

Holland 75 

Russian 185 

Switzerland 107 



14 Japanese Exhibition, 



CHAPTER III. 

Political Conditions. 

7 he Sovereign of Japan. — The foundation of the Empire of Japan 
goes back to about 660 years before the Christian era. Though not 
without suffering from internal warfares and factional strifes, the Im- 
perial family of Japan has governed the country in one unbroken line 
of succession since the first sovereign laid the cornerstone of the Empire 
in the middle part of Japan. In 1871, shortly after the reigning Em- 
peror ascended the throne, an Imperial ordinance was issued which 
once for all abolished the feudal regime that had been the source of 
unceasing internal strife, and caused foreigners to take the Tokugawa 
family for the real sovereign of Japan. The nth day of February, 
1889, witnessed the promulgation of a Constitution, by which Japan 
emerged from an absolute monarchy and made a debut on the political 
stage of the world as a constitutional monarchy. According to the 
Constitution the Emperor is the head of the country, wherein is vested 
the supreme power of ruling, as well as governing the country. He 
exercises the right of legislation with the concurrence of the Imperial 
Diet, administers the government with the help of his Ministers, and 
executes the judicial authority through the court organized by his or- 
dinance. Thus, the Emperor maintains the right of issuing the ordi- 
nance as he sees fit ; of approving or disapproving the law passed by the 
Legislature; of convoking, closing or proroguing the Imperial Diet, 
and of dissolving the House of Representatives ; and of declaring war, 
making peace, and concluding treaties, and so forth. 

Legislature. — The Legislative organ of the Empire is constituted 
of two houses, i. e., the House of Peers and the House of Represen- 
tatives. 

The House of Peers consists of the following members : 

T. Princes of the blood. 

2. Dukes and Marquises. 

3. Members elected from among and by Counts, Viscounts, and 
Barons. 

4. Men of distinguished services or of remarkable erudition. 

5. Members elected from among and by the highest tax-payers, 
each Ken (Prefecture) or Fit (Metropolitan City) returning one mem- 
ber. 

The House of Representatives is composed of 369 members, re- 
turned by ninety-seven electorates. It enjoys the rights of originating 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 15 

and giving consent to the projection of laws ; of approving, modifying 
or disapproving the budgets; of receiving petitions from the people; 
and of submitting memorials to the Throne and representations to the 
Government. 

Justice. — The tribunal of Japan is divided into four grades, namely, 
the Supreme Court, the Court of Appeals, the Local Court, and the 
District Court. The total number of Courts of Appeal is seven, while 
there are one Local Court and several District Courts in each Fu or 
Ken. Although amenable to special disciplinary measures, the tenure 
of judge is held sacred and inviolable and guaranteed by the Constitu- 
tion. The codes of Japan, criminal and civil, as well as her Com- 
mercial Code, were drawn in accordance with the most advanced prin- 
ciples of law yet propounded, and the judiciary authority exercises its 
power independent of the Executive and the Legislative Departments, 
and conforming to the detailed provisions of the law without partiality. 

Executive, — The Executive organ comprises the following nine 
departments, /. e., the Departments of Foreign Affairs, Home Affairs, 
Finance, War, the Navy, Justice, Education, Agriculture and Com- 
merce, and Communications. These nine departments constitute the 
central administrative organ, with a Minister of State at the head of 
each department. The power and duty of superintending all of these 
departments devolve upon Prime Ministers. 

Local Administration, — With the exception of Formosa and Hok- 
kaido, where special administrative laws are still in vogue, a uniform 
system of local administration is applied to all of the three Fu (Metro- 
politan cities) and forty-three Ken (Prefectures). To be more precise, 
there is a Governor in each Fu and Ken, which are subdivided into 
counties (gun) and cities (shi) governed by gtincho and mayor re- 
spectively, while a county resolves itself into towns (c/to) and villages. 

Local Self -Government. — In 1888 a system of local self-govern- 
ment was inaugurated, whereby each city, town and village were author- 
ized to look after their own administrative affairs and the welfare of 
their communities. In each a legislative body is instituted by the mutual 
election of the people. The executive authority of the city is vested in 
the City Council, the Mayor acting as its organ. In the tow^n and 
village the executive power resides in the Cho-Cho (town master) and 
Son-Cho (village master) respectively, both of whom are elected from 
among and by the people. Each county has an assembly as its legis- 
lative organ and a council as its executive body ; while in each Fu and 
Ken there are a legislative assembly and an executive council. C^ver 



i6 Japanese Exhibition, 

all these self-governing communities the Minister of Home. Affairs 
exercises a supervising authority with the co-operation of the Gov- 
ernors (Chiji) of Fu and Ken. 

Administrative Districts. — For the administrative purposes, the 
Avhole country is divided as follows : 

No. 

1. Fu (Metropolitan cities) 3 

2 A'en ( Prefectures) 43 

3. Gun ( Counties) 541 

4. A« (Districts) 2 

5. Island.** 8 

These comprise Honshu. Sliikok'*.. Kushu, and the 
Ruku (Loochoo) Islands. 

6. Hakkaido Administrative Territory: 

a. Districts 3 

b. Sub-administrative territories 18 

These involve Hokkaido and the Chishima Islands 

(the Ktiriles). 

7. Formosa Governor-General's administrative territory 

which is subdivided into twenty districts, comprising 
Formosa and the Pescadores. 



■* 



International Exposition^ St. Louis, 1904. 17 



CHAPTER IV. 



Religion. 



In Japan, the absolute freedom of religious belief and practice is 
constitutionally guaranteed, provided that such belief and practice are 
not prejudicial to peace and order. The two principal religions of 
Japan are Shintoism, comprising 12 sects, and Buddhism, which is 
divided into 13 sects. Confucianism, the doctrine of which was greatly 
advanced by Mencius, can not properly be termed a religion, as it pur- 
poses to teach ethical, but not religious, conceptions of morality; but 
its hold upon Japanese minds is even today so strong that one can not 
get at the psychological characteristics of the Japanese people without 
taking this doctrine into his consideration. In recent years Christianity 
has made a remarkable progress both as to its influence and the number 
of its believers. It will, however, require years of perseverance on the 
part of its devotees before it takes a prominent |X)sition in the domain of 
religion in Japan, owing to the greater influence exercised by the older 
religions and Confucianism. 

The Government assumes impartial attitude towards all these re- 
ligions. Hence» there exists no system of state religion nor any re- 
ligion especially favored by the state. 

In 1901, there were 84,038 Shinto temples and 1,168 students. 
Buddhist temples in the same year numbered 71,788; bonze, 11, 735, and 
students, 1,168. There were also 1,389 licensed preachers and 1,055 
churches and preaching stations of the Roman Catholic, Greek and 
Protestant churches. 

Shrines dedicated to the eminent ancestors of the Emperor, and 
to meritorious subjects, are found in a considerable number. They are 
free from any religious sect, some of them being supported by state or 
local authorities. At the end of the year 1901 the number of such 
shrines was 195,256 and that of ritualists attached to these shrines w-as 
16,365. 



i8 Japanese Exhibition, 



CHAPTER V. 

Financial Conditions. 

Although the finances of Japan were in a deplorable condition 
before the restoration of the Imperial regime and the abolition of the 
feudal system, the unswerving effort of the Government has brought 
about a thoroughgoing adjustment of finances in the course of some 
thirty years following the Restoration — ^an accomplishment which 
might well be regarded as admirable in view of the shortness of the 
period in which the work was done. 

/. National Finances. 

The revenue and expenditure for the five fiscal years beginning 
with the fiscal year 1899- igoo and ending with 1903-04 are presented 
in the following table, the amounts for the years 1899-1900 and 1900- 
190 1, being actual accounts, and those for 1903-04 estimates: 

Year. Revenue. Expenditure. 

1899-1900 254.254,524 254.165,538 

1900- 1901 295,854,863 292,750,059 

1901-1902 274,359,021 266.856,824 

1902-1903 293.991,663 289,226,626 

1903-1904 251,681,961 244*752.346 

The figures for 1901-1902 include a receipt from the Chinese 
indemnity amounting to 18,232,952 yen (the yen — about fifty cents), 
and that of 29,862450 yen raised by loans. 

The following table gives a summary of the budget estimates for 
the year ending March 31, 1904. 

Ordinary— RFAKNUE. Yen. 

Land tax 46,996,212 

Income tax ! 7,412,801 

Business tax 6,792,818 

Tax on alcoholic beverage 66,535,404 

Shoyu tax 3,444,034 

Other taxes 10,387,994 

Customs duties 16,570,655 

Tonnage duties 348,726 

Stamp revenue 13,532,121 

Tobacco monopoly profits 12,605,012 

Posts and telegraphs 25,915,940 

State railway profits 9,387,890 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 19 

Ordinary— rbvbnub— Continued. Yen. 

Forest revenue 2,955,361 

Revenues from other State undertakings and properties 1,876,319 

Other revenues 7,042,212 

Total ordinary 231,802,499 

Extraordinary 19,879,462 

Total revenue 251,681,961 

Ordinary— EXPENDITURE. Yen. 

Civil list 3,000,000 

Imperial Diet 1,730,704 

Foreign affairs 2,284,161 

Interior 10,274,776 

Finance 8,274,007 

Army 38495,727 

Navy 22,077,695 

Justice 10,563,532 

Education 5,073,502 

Agriculture and Commerce 2,943,949 

Communication 21,606,676 

Debt charges 42,402,101 

Annuities and pensions 5,875,558 

Others 3,861,735 

Total ordinary 178,464,121 

Extraordinary expenditure 66,288,2^5 

Total expenditure 244,752,346 

The public debt of Japan for the four years ending 1902 is shown 
in the following table: 

Year. Amount (yen). 

1899 503,200,649 

1900 526,664,195 

1901 581,321,540 

1902 595,643,525 

//. Formosan Finances. 

• 

The finances of Formosa, which was ceded to Japan by China by 
the Shimonoseki treaty of peace of 1895, *^re set apart as a special 
account with the object of making the island self-supporting in time. 

The revenue and expenditure for the fiscal year 1902 stood as 
follows (the subsidy from the central treasury in that year being 

2459763 3'^«) • 

Ordinary. Extraordinary. Total. 

Revenue 12,650,695 7,205,319 19,856,014 

Expenditure 13,245,073 6,610.941 19,856,014 



20 Japanese Exhibition, 

///. Local Finances, 

The existing status of the local finances of Japan is shown in thi 
following three tables : 

1. Tabi<b Showing thk Rbvbnub op Pu and Kbn. 

Year. Taxes. Other Incomes. Total. 

1900 39,854*280 19,019.408 

1901 41,147,070 10,554,683 

1902 41,143,448 10,554,683 

2. Tablb Showing thb Rbvbnub op Citibs, Towns and Vii,i«agbs. 

Year. Taxes. Other Incomes. Total. 

1899 38,475,506 34,559,311 

1900 47,067,257 39,576,191 

1901 54,754,017 43,478,134 

3. Tablb Showing thb Amount op Local and Public Dbbts. 

Cities, Towns 
Year. Fu and Ken. and Villages. 

1900 8,672,639 19,585,565 

1901 9,719,983 26,059,938 

1902 10,379,664 30,328,305 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 21 



CHAPTER VI. 

Currency System. 

Single gold standard theory or principle, promulgated by the Gov- 
ernment in 1897, resulted in the inauguration of the existing currency 
system, which introduced the gold standard for the first time. The 
following is a summary of the salient points of the present currency 
system : 

1. The unit of the coinage shall be 2 "fun" of pure gold (11.574 
grains), and shall be one-half the value of the old gold unit. 

2. The gold coins shall be of three denominations, 5 yen coins, 
10 yen coins, and 20 yen coins, and the gold coins issued under the old 
coinage law shall have double the value of the coins of corresponding 
denominations issued under the new coinage law. 

3. Subsidiary silver pieces shall be of three denominations, 10 
sen pieces, 20 sen pieces, and 50 sen pieces. The 5 sen silver pieces 
issued under the old coinage system shall be in circulation as before. 

4. Subsidiary copper coins shall be three denominations, 5 sen 
nickel pieces, i sen copper pieces and 5 rin copper pieces. The 2 sen 
pieces, i sen pieces, 5 rin pieces and i rin pieces which were issued 
before shall continue in circulation as before. 

The circulation of i yen silver coins that was used as legal tender 
to any amount at the rate of i yen gold piece was prohibited on April 
T» 1898, and its withdrawal from circulation was effected on July 31st 
of the same year. 

The adoption of the gold standard has proved of great benefit to 
the economic and financial advancement of Japan. One of the most 
important advantages attendant upon the new monetary system was 
that it did away with various inconveniences accompanying frequent 
fluctuations in the price of silver. 

In the following table is given the amount of coinage issued from 
1899 to 1902, inclusive: 

1899. 1900. 1901. 1902. 

Gold coins 17,345,782 1 1,687,827 i6,957,i93 25,349,260 

Silver coins 8,745,000 2,630,000 1,076,000 731.000 

Nickel coins 533,ooo 118,000 898,000 126,000 

Copper coins 98,000 31.000 46,000 

The Bank of Japan (Nippon Ginko) enjoys the privilege of issuing 
convertible banknotes on the security of gold or silver coins and bullion 



22 Japanese Exhibition, 

not less than the amount of the notes issued, and also of issuing notes 
on the security of Government bonds and Treasury bills, or other bonds 
or commercial bills of a reliable nature within the limit of 120,000,000 
yen. Those notes issued in excess of the said amount are subject to 
an annual tax of not less than 5 per cent of the amount of the notes in 
question. 

The amount of convertible banknotes issued in the years 1900 and 
1 901 was 228,570,032 yen, and 214,096,766 yen respectively. 

The aggregate of coinage in circulation in 1901 stood at 306,706,- 
gyy, while that in the next year was 326,572,379. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



23 



CHAPTER VII. 

Bank and Credit. 

Although the time has not been very long since Japan ushered in 
the modem method of commerce and industry, her economic develop- 
ment in this comparatively short period has been so remarkable that the 
banking system of the Island Empire is now able to cope with that of 
any other country in its completeness and in convenience it affords. 
The Bank of Japan, or Nippon Ginko, which is the central bank of the 
Empire, has proved of invaluable service in effecting a harmonious and 
stable condition of the financial world ; the Specie Bank has furnished 
many financial facilities for the foreign trade of the country ; the Hypo- 
thec ]3ank, or Kzvangyo Ginko, under the special patronage and super- 
vision of the Government, has greatly contributed to improvement and 
development of agriculture and industry, and the Agricultural-Industrial 
Bank of Japan has furnished many conveniences in similar direction. 
These banks are carrying on their business under the supervision of the 
central or the local Government. The Bank of Formosa and the Hok- 
kaido Colonization Bank were established for the purpose of developing 
the natural resources of Hokkaido respectively. 

The following table gives some of the important features of the 
banks existing at the end of 1903 : 



Banks. 



Head 
Office. 



Bank of Japan 

Yokohama Specie Bank 

Hypothec Bank of 

Japan 

Hokkaido Colonization 
Bank 

Bank of Formosa 

Agricultural - Industrial 

Bank 46 

National banks if867 

Savings Banks 441 



Branch 
Office. 

8 
13 



Paid up 
Capital. 

30,000,000 
18,000,000 



Amounts 
of Deposits 

(1901). 

20,157,054 
46,510,846 



Amounts 
of Loans 

(1901). 

71,348,602 
25496,825 



I 


2,098,400 


219,230 


1,455,213 


3 


1,250,000 


4,549,983 


5,702,770 


I 


26,050,000 


13,421,137 


23,086,785 


1,457 


257,939,039. 


450,186,472 


356,356,565 


542 


23.370,017 


30,188.630 


41,117,027 



Total 2,359 2,025 361,207,017 555.233,352 538,612.366 



24 Japanese Exhibition, 

Along with the development of banking system, the organization of 
clearing houses has made remarkable progress. The following table 
shows the amount of bills cleared through the clearing houses in various 
commercial centers: 

v^» Tokyo Osaka Kyoto Vokohoma Kobe 

^**'- (yen). (yen). (yen). (yen). (yen). 

1900 MOS,449,664 523,552,745 i67,S66^39 348,3o6,775 168,228,769 

1901 1,168,702,078 528,122,082 145,905,182 390,516,606 202,653,853 

1902 1,350,791,066 663,659,703 155,957,014 416,126,576 251,656,959 

1903 1,399,704,338 739,500,536 150,150,581 445,932,771 366,973,242 



International Exposition, St. Lol-is, 1904. 



CHAPTER VIII. 

Insurance. 

The first insurance institution ever organized in Japan was fire 
insurance, which was followed by life insurance and marine insurance. 
Since 1877 there has sprung up like mushrooms an enormous number of 
insurance companies, not a few of which possess an insufficient fund 
to carr\' on their business. Seeing a danger possible in such an un- 
wholesome condition of reckless enterprise, the Government inaugurated 
a law in 1900 whereby the following provisions have been strictly put in 
force : 

1. All insurance companies should be organized either as joint 
stock companies or as mutual companies. 

2. No insurance company should be allowed to carry on any other 
business along with that of insurance. 

3. Any one and the same company should not carry life insurance 
alongside other lines of insurance. 

4. The capital of any one insurance company should not be less 
than 100,000 yen. 

This law has greatly assisted in putting insurance companies on 
a sound basis, preventing the unwholesome springing of insecure cor- 
porations. 

The following table gives a few statistical facts concerning the 
existing condition of insurance companies : 

1. Life Insurance. 

No. No. Value of 

Year. Companies. Capital. Policies. Policies. 

1901 (ending March 31) 40 8,705,000 787,689 197,684,522 

1902 (Ibid) 37 8,595,000 668,735 181,651,115 

2. Fire Insurance. 

No. No. Value of 

Year. Companies. Capital. Policies. Policies. 

1901 (ending March 31) 19 15,820,000 241,841 351,206,649 

1902 (Ibid) 20 16.700,000 280,070 427,852,438 

3. Marine Insurance. 

No. No. Value of 

Year. Companies. Capital. Policies. Policies. 

1901 (ending March 31) ... . 3 7,500,000 

1902 (Ibid) 3 7.500,000 8,737 17.071.057 

4. Transportation Insurance. 

No. No. Value of 

Year. Companies. Capital. Policies. Policies. 

1901 4 1 1,200,000 

TQ02 4 I T, 200.000 1.280 1.466,833 



26 



Japanese Exhibition, 



CHAPTER IX. 



Savings System. 



As a means of encouraging the thrift and diligence of people, Japan 
instituted savings banks and postal savings institutions throughout the 
country. Although the idea of laying by savings is not yet widely 
■diflFused among the masses of people, it is encouraging to note that the 
amount of savings has been steadily increasing. Besides reg^ilar sav- 
ings deposits, an enormous sum of funds bearing the nature of savings 
has been deposited at various banks as ordinary deposits. 

The following two tables give some statistical facts concerning the 
present condition of savings service. 



Tabids of Dbposits. 



Bank of 
Year. Japan. 

1899 4,938725 

1900 2,027,234 

1901 2,557,762 

1902 3.363.388 



National 


Special 




Banks. 


Banks. 


Total. 


470,057,184 


1,222,815 


476,218,724 


505.964.503 


7.134.273 


515,126,100 


514.956,513 


8,188,940 


525,703,215 


616,474,986 


12,123,528 


631,961,902 



Tablb op Savings Deposits. 

Savings Postal 

Year. Banks. Savings. 

1899 44,748,884 24,014,043 

1900 49.458,580 24.733,449 

1901 44,021,626 27.971,281 

1902 51,646,865 30,455,918 



Total. 

68,762,927 
74,192,029 
71,992,907 
82,102,783 



These two tables show the amount of deposits and savings exist- 
ing at the end of each year, excluding government and municipal 
■deposits. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



CHAPTER X. 



Foreign Trade. 



/. Japan Proper. 



The foreign trade of Japan is carried on exclusively through the 
open ports of Yokohama, Kobe, Osaka. Nagasaki, Hakodate, and 20 
special export ports. The aggregate value of the foreign commerce of 
Japan from 1898 to 1902, inclusive, is estimated as follows : 



Imports . 
Exports . 



1898. 
Ven. 

324,704,483 
168,213,070 



1899. 
Yen. 

229.014,695 

218,350,957 



1900. 
Yen. 

313.329.329 
209,551,852 



1901. 
Yen. 

282,189,094 
263,345.112 



1902. 
Yen. 

290,809,575 
267,855,021 



The commercial intercourse of Japan was mainly with the follow- 
ing countries, and to the following values in the years 1901 and 1902 : 



Imports 

1901. 

Countries. Yen. 

Australia 1,777,599 

Austria 4,938,198 

Belgium 5,810,897 

British America 181,785 

British India 42,779,905 

Straits Settlement 

China 27,256,986 

France 3,752,828 

French India 4,082,897 

Germany 28,320,102 

Great Britain 50,575,789 

Holland -. . . . 408,244 

Hong Kong 11,141,788 

Italy 154,382 

Korea 10,052,438 

Philippines 2,981,031 

Russia 210,276 

Russian Asia 4,515,165 

Siam 1,195,082 

Switzerland 2,208,574 

U. S. A 42.769,430 



from 


Exports to 


1902. 


1901. 


1902. 


Yen. 


Yen. 


Yen. 


1,672,218 


2,533,357 


3,172.092 


2,376,656 


1,386,964 


1,143.310 


6,977.656 


519,327 


600,497 


517,274 


3.276,114 


3,485,841 


49,302,846 


9,657.596 


5,067,263 


1,674.323 




8,269,633 


40,590,858 


42,925,579 


46,838,545 


4.745,776 


27,275,671 


27.283,458 


5,649,946 


148,470 


158,411 


25,812,921 


5.251,071 


4.737.029 


50.364,029 


11,482,504 


17,346,149 


772,666 


344.025 


745,249 


2,454,881 


41,786,647 


25,876,059 


186,813 


1 2,569,485 


13,287,556 


7,957,946 


11.372,551 


10,554,183 


1,49.3,865 


• 2,580,682 


1,731,739 


103,114 


852,315 


968,937 


5,963,858 


2,290,447 


2,144,961 


1,695.780 


32,002 


56,347 


1,951.047 


150,284 


755.916 


48,652.825 


72,300,359 


80,232,805 



28 Japanese Exhibition. 

The following table shows the chief articles of import, re-imports 

excluded, for 1901 and 1902: 

1901. 1902. 

Articles. Yen. Yen. 

Rice 1 1,878,958 I7»750,8i i 

Flour 2,873*302 3,278,324 

Pulse, etc 5»328,i36 5.786,707 

Sugar 33.529,803 14.489,235 

Wines, food, etc 7,087,786 9,018,441 

Tobacco I2i,09r 995,976 

Wool and manufacture 11,848,458 14,304,534 

Cotton and seed 60,650,362 79,784,771 

Cotton manufacture 14,144,588 17.164,817 

Cocoons and raw silk, manufacture of 1,542,772 2,456,978 

Flax, hemp and jute manufacture 1,665,693 2,102,937 

Other tissues and manufacture 844,803 1,055,723 

Iron, steel and manufacture 19,998,204 18,768,763 

Other metals and manufacture 5,416,198 5,067,937 

Arms, machines, etc 16,738,947 12,114,323 

Vessels 2,565,893 1.488,012 

Glass and manufacture 1,395,458 1,836,907 

Horns, ivory, skins, hairs, etc 2,977,177 3,076,051 

Drugs, etc 5.527,045 7,183,083 

Dyes and paints 5,358,6o6 6,682,355 

Paper and stationery 3,216,853 4,947,870 

Petroleum 14,943,401 14,937,169 

Other oil and wax 1,418.161 1,762,807 

Manure 9,796,579 12,122,081 

The chief articles of export from Japan are given in the following 

^"^^^ ■ 1901. 1902. 

Articles. Yen. Yen. 

Rice 6,908,913 6,679,544 

Other corns and flour 137,809 159,589 

Food 10,299,514 9,595,795 

Tea 8,854,327 10,484,017 

Wines, etc 1,925,288 1,709,592 

Tobacco 1,748,493 2,365,793 

Silk, raw 79,136,099 82,573,273 

Silk and manufacture 30,001,040 31,380,836 

Cotton yarn 21,465,578 19.901,523 

Textiles 7,749,694 8,543,185 

Clothing, etc 2,442,764 2,860,394 

Copper 13,904.610 10,263,984 

Copper manufacture and other metals and 

manufacture 1,916,663 2,532,467 

Skins, hair, shells, horns, etc 1,035,811 1,106,701 

Drugs and colors 0,576,367 6,150,749 

Porcelains and earthenware 2,491,663 2,461,544 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 29 

1901. 1902. 

Articles. Yen. Yen. 

Matches 7,392,869 8,169,966 

Paper and manufacture 1,659,301 i,735»588 

Mats for floor 5,351,111 6,772496 

Straw-plaits 2,989,836 2,938,858 

Oil and wax i,709,55i 2,486,914 

Coal (without ships' use) 17,542,273 17,270,417 

Miscellaneous 16,305,242 17,381,068 

//. Shipping and Navigation. 

In 1902, the merchant navy of Japan (without Formosa) consisted 
of 1,033 steamers of modern type, above 20 tons, aggregating 605,122 
tons ; 3,591 sailing vessels of modem type, above 20 tons, their aggre- 
gate tonnage being 329,839; and 1,260 native craft above 200 "koku," 
of 548,422 kokii. 

Below is given the shipping statistics of the Japanese ports (with- 
out Formosa), exclusive of coasting trade, for 1902, each vessel being 
counted at every port it entered. 

Entered. Cleared. 

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. 

Japanese steamships 3,226 4,309,164 3,239 4,324,213 

Japanese sailing ships and junks. 1,465 72,254 1,542 75,53' 

Foreign steamships 2,985 7,090,249 2,972 7,097,378 

Foreign sailing ships • 88 102,779 92 107,951 

Total 7J64 1 1,574,446 7,852 1 1,605,073 

The following table shows the nationalities of foreign vessels 
entered the Japanese ports in 1902 : 

BriUsh. German. Russian. Norwegian. American. French. 

No. of vessels.. 639 382 319 254 210 113 

Tonnage 4,155,789 1,228,244 466,615 280,360 560,866 251,113 

Of the total shipping in 1902, 729 vessels of 1,403,898 tons entered 
Nagasaki; 555 of 1,525,493 tons, Yokohama; 992 of 2,160,168 tons, 
Kobe; and 797 of 1,618,824 tons, Moji. 

///. Formosa. 

The following table shows the value of the trade of Formosa with 

Japan proper. 

•^ '^ ^ *^^ 1900. 1901. 1902. 

Yen. Yen. Yen. 

Exports 4,248,558 7,345,956 7,407,498 

Imports 8,439,033 8,782,256 9-235.290 



7,0 Japanese Exhibition, 

The foreign trade of Formosa is shown in the following table : 

1898. 1899. 1900 1901. 1902. 

Yen. Yen. Yen. Yen. Yen. 

Exports 16,879,190 14,237.092 13.570,664 12,809,795 10,100,532 

Imports 12,827,190 11.114,922 10,571,285 8,298,800 10,816,868 

The following table shows the chief articles of the foreign com- 
merce of Formosa (re-imports and re-exports excluded) for 1901 and 

1902: , ^ 

-^ Imports. Exports. 

1901. T902. 1901. 1902. 

Yen. Yen. Yen. Yen. 

Beverages and combustibles 1,856.548 1,534,375 6,241,145 9,690,127 

Drugs and dyes 2,676,670 1,830,590 930»7i9 2.778,387 

Metals and their manufacture. . . 1,044,674 312,333 1.799 15.829 

Tissues, yarns, etc 2.264,528 2,038,125 429,965 427.786 

Oil and wax 967,638 943.206 37.^29 15.560 



PART II 



PART ii: 



JAPANESE EXHIBITS IN VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS* 



CHAPTER I. 
Department of Education. 

Introductory Remarks, 

In collecting the exhibits in this department, the Japanese Com- 
mission, with the co-operation of the Department of Education, en- 
-deavored to make them represent some of the important features of our 
educational institutions and various works pertaining to the same which 
have made a remarkable progress in recent years. The Department of 
Education determined what and whose exhibits should be accepted. 

Brief History of Education, — The origin of the old system of 
education in Japan dates from the reign of the Emperor Ojin (270 
A. D.), and reached its highest pitch of development during the reign 
of the Emperor Mommu (697 A. D.). In the latter part of the 
Twelfth Century it began to decline, and did not recover until late 
in the Sixteenth Century, when it entered another period of vigorous 
growth. With the accession of the present Emperor to the throne, in 
1867, the old system of education gave way to the Western system, 
which has made wonderful progress in a comparatively short period. 
In 1869 regulations relating to universities and middle and elementary 
schools were promulgated. In 1871, the Department of Education was 
established, under the jurisdiction of which was brought all the affairs of 
education. In the succeeding year the Code of Education was drafted and 
put into force, which was, however, replaced by another code in 1879. 
This new code, too, was found deficient in many respects, and, after 
several changes and counter-changes, gave way to the Imperial Ordi- 
nance in 1886, which, though not without undergoing alterations in 
various minor points, has remained unchanged in its main features. 

In 1890, a revision was introduced to the [mperial Ordinance re- 
lating to elementary schools. This revision inaugurated a system of 
compulsory education as regards elementary schools. In 1893, a meas- 
ure was adopted by which to realize a wider dissemination of technical 
knowledge. The war with China in 1894-5, which resulted inter 



34 



Japanese Exhibiiion, 



alia in enormously augmenting our educational funds, was followed by 
a period of great activity in the field of educational undertakings. In 
1900, the compulsory elementary education was made easier to enforce 
by the abolition of tuition fees. Moreover, where circumstances allow, 
primary education was to be made absolutely free. 

According to the latest statistics (1902- 1903), the number of va- 
rious schools and their instructors and students stands as follows: 



No. of No. of No. of No. of 

Schools. Instructors. Students. Graduates. 

Elementary schools 27,154 109,114 5.135.487 935.429 

Blind and dumb schools 19 loi 1.063 9^ 

Normal schools 57 1,031 19.194 9*058 

Higher normal schools 3 129 1.094 247 

Institutions for training middle 

school teachers 5 57 169 

Middle schools 258 4,681 95,027 1 1,179 

Girls' higher schools 80 1,175 21,563 4,809 

Higher schools 8 301 4,781 875 

Imperial universities 2 349 4,046 729 

Special schools 56 1,350 19,964 2,685 

Fine art schools i 42 324 60 

Music schools i 45 423 ^3 

Technical schools 854 2,789 60,051 8,317 

Institutions for training technical 

school teachers 3 46 150 52 

Miscellaneous 1,657 5.546 106,169 22,118 

Total 36,158 126,712 5,469,442 995.676 

The number of libraries in the same year was 67, which is rather 
small in view of the remarkable progress realized in other spheres of 
our educational institutions- The percentage of elementary school at- 
tendance has increased from 58.73 to 91.75 during the seven years 
following the Japan-China war. The increase in the number of schools 
and students since the same war is shown in the following table : 

Increase in No. Increase in No. 
of Schools. of Students. 

Elementary schools 3,194 1,797,927 

Normal schools 10 13.475 

Middle schools i8| 75,464 

Higher schools (girls) 52 18,503 

Industrial schools 102 17,399 

Higher normal schools i 844 

Teachers' training schools S 319 

Imperial university i 2,659 

Special schools 16 9,191 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 35 

The expenditure of the Department of Education for the year 1885 
did not exceed 1,000,000 yen, whereas it reached in 1902 to 7,090,000 
yen, including both ordinary and extraordinary expenditures. A re- 
markable increase is also seen in the educational expenditure of Fu 
and Ken. 

In Japan, schools established and maintained by the subscriptions 
and donations of private individuals form a very important factor in 
her educational system. These private schools cover quite an extensive 
field of instruction, ranging from the elementary to the more advanceS 
courses of study. 

The Present Educational System. — As a general rule the educa- 
tional institutions of Japan are under the control of the Department of 
Education. There are, however, several exceptions to this rule. 

The first of these exceptions is found in the Peers' School and the 
Peeresses' Schools, which are under the care of the Department of the 
Imperial Household. 

In the second place, the Departments of the Army and of the Navy 
superintend the Military College, the Naval College, the School of Ar- 
tillery, the Military Medical School, the Toyama Military School, the 
Naval Engineering School, the Military Cadets' School, etc. 

The third exception is found in the School of Police and Prison 
Management and the School of Japanese Classics, under the direct sur- 
veillance of the Department of Home Affairs. 

Again, under the control of the Department of Communications 
come the Post and Telegraph School and the Nautical School, where 
special topics connected with communications and marine transporta- 
tion are taught. 

Finally, the entire educational institutions of Formosa comes under 
the jurisdiction of the Governor-General of Formosa. These include 
the Japanese Language School, the Normal School, and elementary 
schools. 

Libraries, Museums, and Educational Associations. — According to 
the statistics of 1902, there were one Government library, twenty pub- 
lic libraries, and forty-six private libraries. Among the books collected, 
those open to the public were 820,670 volumes, of which 751,278 were 
Japanese and Chinese, and 70,392 European and American works. A 
great majority of these books belong to the Government Library. 

The most perfectly equipped museums in the country are those be- 
longing to the Department of the Imperial Household. They are the 
Tokyo Imperial Museum, the Kyoto Imperial Museum and the Nava 
Imperial Museum. Among the museums especially intended for edu- 



36 



Japanese Exhibition, 



cation, the Tokyo Educational Museum attached to the Tokyo Higher 
Normal School and the ^luseum of Sapporo Agricultural School are 
comparatively large and well equipped- There are also some museums 
established by prefectural governments. 

Along with the development of schools and educational adminis- 
tration, there has sprung up an enormous number of educational asso- 
ciations. Even in small villages or in remote mountain regions, there 
is hardly a place where such organizations can not be found. The most 
important' of these associations is the Imperial Educational Society of 
Japan. By far the greatest number of the educational associations in 
Japan are of private organization, while many are subsidized by pre- 
fectural governments or municipalities. 

Exhibits, 



GROUP 1- 

Elementary^ Edticotion* 

I. Department of Education, 
Tokio — 

Diagram showing the correlation 
between Higher and Lower 
Schools. 

Statistical table showing the 
number of Government, public 
and private schools. 

Diagram showing the cost of 
public education. 

Diagram showing the physical 
development of pupils in Gov- 
ernment, public and private 
schools. 

A book on educational institu- 
tions of Japan. 

Photos of the kindergarten at- 
tached to the Higher Normal 
School for Females. 

Diagram showing the percentage 
of children of school age. 

Comparative table showing the 
percentage of children of school 
age. 



Statistical table showing the num- 
ber of Government, public and 
private elementary schools. 

Photos of the elementary school 
attached to the Tokio Higher 
Normal School. 

Photos of the Tokwa elementary 
school established bv the Citv 
of Tokio. 

Statistical table relating to pubUc 
normal schools. 

Photos of the normal school of 
Tokio-fu. 

2. Elementary School attached to 
the Higher Normal School, 
Tokio — 
Drawing. 
Map. 

Composition. 
Children's work : 
Vocabulary lesson. 
Phrase construction. 
Science lessons. 
Drawing lessons. 
Specimens for science. 
Models for sewing. 



International Exposition, St, I.ouis, 1904. 



37 



3. Kindergarten attached to the 

Higher Normal School for 
Females, Tokio — 

A book on nursery in the Kinder- 
garten attached to the Higher 
Normal School for Females. 

Designs for handiwork. 

Kindergarten games. 

Kindergarten songs. 

Materials for handiwork. 

Children's work. 

Drawing. 

Needle work. 

Paper cutting. 

Paper folding. 

Paper setting. 

Clay work. 

Pea work. 

4. The Girl's Normal School of 

Tokio-fu, Tokio — 

Examination papers on morals, 
pedagogies, Japanese, Chinese, 
history, geography, etc. 

Examination papers on house- 
hold management. 
Exercise books on composition. 
Exercise books on penmanship. 
Exercise books on drawing. 

5. The Normal School of Tokio- 

fu, Tokio — • 
Examination papers on moral 
pedagogies, Japanese, Chinese, 
history and geography. 

Examination papers on mathe- 
matics, physics, chemistry and 
natural science. 

Exercise book on penmanship. 
Free handwriting. 
Instrumental drawing. 



6. Tokio Higher Normal School, 
Tokio — 

Specimens of manual works, with 
explanatory notes. 

Objects illustrating the process 
of teaching manual works in 
elementary schools and the 
tools used. 

Objects illustrating the process of 
teaching manual works in nor- 
mal schools and the tools used, 
etc. 

GROUP 2. 

Secondary Educotion* 

I. Department of Education, 
Tokio — 

Statistical table showing the num- 
ber of Government, public and 
private middle schools. 

Statistical table showing the num- 
ber of Government, public and 
private higher schools for fe- 
males. 

Statistical table showing the num- 
ber of Government higher 
schools. 

Photos of the First Higher 
School. 

IMiotos of the Third Middle 
School of Tokio-fu. 

Photos of the Third Higher 
School for girls of Tokio-fu. 

Photos of the Tokio Higher Nor- 
mal School and the Higher 
Normal School for Females. 

Statistical charts of Government 
Higher Normal Schools. 



38 



Japanese Exhibition, 



2. Higher Normal School for 

Females, Tokio — 

Calendar of the school. 

Syllabus of the school. 

Details of courses of instruction 
in sewing, knitting and draw- 
ing. 

Charts illustrating the process of 
embroidery and sewing. 

Explanatory note to the same. 

Copy book for drawing. 

Set of instruments used in em- 
broidery. 

Set of instruments used in draw- 
ing (with explanatory notes). 

Pupils' works. 

Pedagogies. 

Composition. 

Chinese. 

English. 

History. 

Geography. 

Mathematics. 

Physics. 

Chemistry. 

Natural science. 

Household management. 

Embroidery. 

Drawings (5 tablets, 7 vols., i 
case, 9 sheets). 

3. Higher School for Girls at- 

tached to the Higher Normal 
School for Females, Tokio — 

Details of courses of instruction. 

Curriculum. 

Models for sewing lessons. 

Photos. 

Works done by pupils — Morals, 

Pedagogies, Composition. 
Letters. 
Japanese language. 



English language. 

History. 

Geography. 

Mathematics. 

Physics. 

Botany. 

Physiology. 

Household management. 

Drawing. 

Sewing. 

Penmanship. 

4. Higher School for Girls of 
Kioto-fn, Kioto — 

Articles made by the first-year 
students of the special course 
of industrial arts. 

Man's cotton garment (lined). 

Woman's silk garment (un- 
lined). 

Trousers for children. 

Man's "obi" (belt). 

Woman's cotton **haori" (coat). 

Woman's padded cotton garment. 

Woman's katabira (thin gar- 
ment). 

W^oman's silk garment (lined), 
and obi (belt). 

Babv's cloth. 

Hifu (coat) without sleeves. 

Articles made by second year stu- 
dents of the special course of 
industrial arts : 

Man's padded silk garment. 

Man's unlined silk haori (coat). 

Rain coat. 

Woman's padded garment. 

Woman's padded silk haori 
(coat). 

Girls' hakania (trousers). 

Lady's garments pictured in 
colors. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



39 



Hakama (trousers) unlined. 

Baby's hakama (trousers) made 
by third year students of the 
special course of industrial arts. 

Hifu coat of silk. 

Socks. 

Lady's long undergarment of silk. 

Man's lined silk haori (coat;. 

Woman's lined crepe haori 
(coat). 

Hiyokii garment. 

Kasane Katabira (double thin 
garment). 

Silk hakama (trousers) lined. 

Lady's long-sleeved uchikake 
(overgarment). 

Yogi (bed clothes for winter). 

Specimens of raised fancy work : 

Articles made by the first year 
students of the special course of 
art industry. 

\^essel for cakes. 

Tray for visiting cards. 

Chop-stick case. 

Shashin-kake (photo frame), 
made by the second year stu- 
dent of the special course of 
industrial arts. 

Tobacco case. 

Hashira-kake (ornament for 
post). 

Small bag. 

Money purse. 

Japanese head-gear (worn by 
child). 

Ivory koto-string holder, made by 
the third year student of the 
special course of art industry. 

Box. 

Wrapper with figures sewn. 

Elbow supporter. 

Drawing-book. 



5. The Middle School attached 

to Tokio Higher Normal 
School. 
Exercise on English composition. 
Exercise on mathematics. 
Map and drawing. 
Note book on natural sciences. 
Journals of To-in-kwai (pupils' 

society). 
Memorandum book of class. 
Pupils' diary. 
Note of observations on the 

eclipse of the moon. 
Sketch-book. 

6. Ten Middle Schools of Osaka- 

fit, Osaka (collective ex- 
hibit) — 
Explanatory remarks. 
Photographs and their explana- 
tions. 
Physics and chemistry class at 

Kitano Middle School. 
Swimming class of Sakai Middle 

School. 
Military drill of Yao Middle 

School. 
Natural history class of Ibaraki 

Middle School. 
Tennoji Middle School. 
Jtijutsu (kind of wrestling). 
Class of lecture on morals. 
Kishiwada Middle School. 
Drawing, Ichioka Middle School. 
Gymnastic exercise at Tonda- 

bayashi Middle School. 
Japanese penmanship, Shijona- 

wate Middle School. 
Gekken (kind of fencing) Ikeda 

Middle School. 

7. The Second Higher School for 

Girls, of Tokio-fu, Tokio — 
Drawing. 



40 



Japanese Exhibition, 



GROUP 3. 

Education* 

1. Department of Education, 

Tokio — 

Photographs of Imperial Univer- 
sity of Tokio. 

Statistical table of Imperial Uni- 
versities. 

Statistical table of Government 
special schools of medicine. 

Photos of the Tokio Higher 
Technical School. 

Statistical table relating to Gov- 
ernment Higher Technical 
School. 

Photos of the Imperial Library. 

Photos of the Library of Osaka- 
fu. 

Photos of the Imperial Museum 
of Tokio. 

Photos of the Educational Mu- 
seum of Tokio. 

2. Imperial University of Tokio, 

Tokio — 

Memorandum of L'niversity. 

A screen with photos, showing 
various experiments and appa- 
ratuses relating to psycho- 
physics. 

Apparatuses for ascertaining mo- 
mentary sensation of colors and 
shapes. 

Comparative study of various 
stimuli to the human attention. 

Apparatus for ascertaining the 
velocity of transmitting the vi- 
bration of solution within a 
caoutchouc tube. 



Apparatus for ascertaining the 
quantity of electric current pro- 
duced by platina-electrode on 
touching the point which the 
vibration of a solution within 
a caoutchouc tube passes. 

Apparatus for ascertaining the 
extent of vibrations which 
passes through a solution 
within caoutchouc tubes of dif- 
ferent dimensions. 

Apparatus for ascertaining the 
velocity of writing movements. 

Apparatus for ascertaining the 

comparative time of cognition 

of Kana, Chinese characters 

and Roman letters. 
Experiments for measuring the 

time required for various men- 
tal functions. 
Experiments on comparing the 

length of subjective time. 
Experiments on the measurement 

of rhythmical function. 
Specimens and charts showing 

classes and distribution of the 

relics of the Stone Age. 
Instrument for measuring the 

tension of magnetic bodies 

when magnetized. 
Instrument for measuring the 

vibration of pendulum stard. 
Models of the topographic 

anatomy of the horse. 
Topographic anatomy of pelvic 

cavity and inguinal region. 
Arteries of pelvic cavity. 
Arteries of anterior and posterior 

extremities. 
\'^eins of anterior and posterior 

extremities. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



4t 



Arteries of brain. 

Hoof. 

Report of Agricultural College. 

3. Tokio Higher Technical 
School, Tokio — ' 

Figured satin for obi. 

Serge for hakama. 

Dyed pattern book. 

Dyed pattern for lining. 

Plans of workshop for dyeing 

and weaving. 
Figured satin for household 
articles (made by students of 
dyeing and weaving section). 
Woven patterns. 
Silk handkerchiefs. 
Muji somemono (dyed patterns 

unfigured). 
Printed patterns. 
Utensils used in Japanese print- 
ing. 
Flower vase of Asahi ware. 
Placque of Asahi ware. 
Porcelain flower vase. 
Majolica futamono (jar) and ash 

tray. 
Stone flower vase. 
Placque of stone. 

Set of porcelain ware, etc., illus- 
trating the process of manu- 
facturing porcelain. 
Zen ( square tray ) . 
IVan (wooden bowl), etc. 
Bon (tray). 
Sake (soft liquor). 
Mir in (sweet sake). 
Soy. 

Koji (yeast rice). 
V'ermillion. 
Chrome yellow. 
Prussian blue. 



Iodine. 

Sulphate of alumina. 

Sulphate of aluminia. 

Acetate of lead. 

Camphor. 

Menthol. 

Petroleum. 

Rape seed oil. 

Picric acid. 

Photos made by students of me- 
chanical section. 

Bronze flower vase. 

Bronze flower pot. 

Specimens of colored bronze. 

Instrumental drawings (by stu- 
dents of electro-mechanical 
section). 

Map showing electrical plants in 
Japan. 

Reports of experiments (made by 
students of electro-mechanical 
course). 

Reports of travels (made by stu- 
dents of electro-mechanical 
course). 

Refined copper. 

Carbonate of lime. 

Straw electricallv bleached. 

Gas cotton. 

Rugs. 

Designs for wall paper (made by 
students of industrial design- 
ing)- 
* Lacquered cigarette case with 

photographic pictures (made by 
students of industrial design- 
ing)- 

Instrumental drawings (by stu- 
dents of architecture course). 

Map showing* places where the 
graduates of this school arc cm- 
ployed. 



42 



Japanese Exhibition, 



GROUP 4. 
Special Education in Fine Arts« 

1. Department of Education, 

Tokio — 

Photos of the Tokio Fine Art 
School. 

Statistical table relating to Gov- 
ernment Fine Art School. 

Photos of the Tokio Academy of 
Music. 

Statistical table relating to Gov- 
ernment Music School. 

2. Tokio Fine Art School, 

Tokio — 

Folding screen (course of Japan- 
ese drawing). 

Copy book of designs (course of 
Japanese drawing). 

. Oil painting, character (course of 
European drawing). 

Oil painting, scenery (course of 
European painting). 

Oil painting, flowers (course of 
European painting). 

Oil painting from nature, char- 
acter. 

Oil painting from nature, genre 
(course of European painting). 

Water color painting, character 
(course of European drawing). 

Water color painting, historical 
sketch, (course of European 
drawing) . 

Designs for decorating walls, in 
water color (course of 
European drawing). 

Tablet showing various designs 
of architectural decoration 
(course of designing). 



Tablet showing various designs 
of industrial articles (course of 
designing). 

Stag for ornament (course of 
sculpture). 

Small screen inlaid with figure, 
flower, etc. (course of sculp- 
ture). 

Buddhist deity Monju for orna- 
ment (course of sculpture). 

Cock, carved in wood (course of 
sculpture). 

i\fan, carved in wood (course of 
sculpture). 

Jikubon (tray to put kakemono) 
(course of sculpture). 

Incense burner, silver (course of 
metal engraving). 

Silver ornament, with birds 
(course of metal engraving). 

Silver case for incense (course of 
metal engraving). 

Silver vessel for flower (course of 
metal repousse). 

Silver flower vase (course of re- 
pousse) . 

Copper water pot (course of re- 
pousse). 

Material for the seal, copper 
(course of metal casting). 

Paper weight (course of metal 
casting). 

Pen supporter (course of metal 
casting). 

Okiniono, ornament (course of 
metal casting). 

Sumidai, inkstand course of 
metal casting). 

Ink-stone. 

Box for writing materials (sec- 
tion of lacquer work). 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



43 



Box for colored paper (section of 

lacquer work). 
Fiibako, letter case (section of 

lacquer work). 
Kyarabako, incense box (section 

of lacquer work). 
Xatsumc, case for keeping tea 

(course of lacquer work). 
Nikiichiy vessel to put in stamp 

and ink (course of lacquer 

work). 
Chabako, tea box (course of 

lacquer work). 
Kobon, tray for incense (course 

of lacquer work). 
Tablet showing products of art 

industry. 
Description of the Tokio Fine 

Art School (in tablet). 
Cards containing short account of 

the school. 

GROUP 5* 
Special Edtscation in Asfriculture* 

1. Department of Education, 

Tokio — 

Statistical table of Government 
Higher Agricultural Schools. 

2. Sapporo Agricultural School, 

Hokkaido — 

Journal of the Sapporo Agricul- 
tural School. 

Photos : 

View of the main building. 

Interior view of the agricultural 
laboratory. 

Interior view of the zootechnical 
laboratory. 

Interior view of chemical labora- 
torv. 



Interior view of botanical-path- 
ology laboratory. 

Interior view of herbarium- 
pathology laboratory. 

Interior view of entomological 
laboratory. 

Reading room in the library. 

View of experimental farm. 

View of water field. 

View of cattle shed and cattle in 
pasture. 

View of mowing grass. 

View of gathering crops. 

View of orchard. 

View of ploughing. 

Faculties of the school. 

Explanatory notes. 

GROUP 6. 

Special Education in Commerce 
and Industry* 

1. Arita Technical School of 

Saga-ken. 

Rindate (vessel for holding small 
flower). 

Flower vase. 

Jar. 

Cake plate. 

Designs for porcelain. 

Corean dog for ornament (porce- 
lain). 

Incense box. 

Flower vase. 

Mantel ornament. 

2. Department of Education, 

Tokio — 
Photos of the Girls' Industrial 

School (incorporated). 
Album of photos of lacquer work 

school established bv the 

Lacquermen's Union of Shizu- 

oka. 



44 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Album of photos of Agricultural 

School of Ivvate-ken. 
Photos of Art and Industrial 

School of Kagawa-ken. 
Album of photos of the Art and 

Industrial School of Tovama- 

ken. 
Photos of the Arita Technical 

School of Saga-ken. 
Photos of the Technical School of 

Ishikawa-ken. 
Album of photos of dyeing and 

weaving school of the city of 

Kyoto. 
Album of photos of the Fine Art 

and Industrial School of the 

city of Kyoto. 
Dyed and woven patterns of old 

and new style. 
Statistical table showing the num- 
ber of Government Higher 

Commercial Schools. 
Photos of the Tokio Higher Com- 
mercial School. 

3. Dyeing and Weaving School 
of the City of Kyoto — 

I. WEAVING SECTION. 

Kohai kaiki silk (by students of 

special course). 
Handkerchief of habutai silk (by 

students of special course). 
Cotton of plain weaving (by stu- 
dents of first year course). 
Cotton woven with a twill (by 

students of the first vear 

course). 
Ichiraku cotton (by students of 

the first year course). 
Satin (by students of the first 

year course). 



Cambric ( by students of the sec- 
ond year course). 

Doily (by students of the second 
year course). 

Handkerchief. 

Pique. 

Futsu. 

Shuchin necktie (by students of 
the third year course). 

Atsuita. 

Product of power loom. 

2. DYEING SECTION. 

Specimens of dyed thread, cot- 
ton and linen (by students of 
the first year course). 

Specimens of silk and wool 
threads (by students of second 
year course). 

Species of black dye (by students 
of second year course). 

Pattern of print (by students of 
third year course). 

Cotton of sarasa print (by stu- 
dents of third year course). 

l^'igured cotton (by students of 
third year course). 

Colored fukusa or cloth used for 
wrapping (by students of third 
year course). 

Colored hanyeri, or collars of 
garments for women (by stu- 
dents of third year course). 

Black dye with family badge (by 
students of special course). 

Cloth for dyeing (by students of 
special course). 

Cotton threads (by students of 
special course). 

Designs. 

Outline of instruction in design- 
ing. 



International Exposition. St. Louis, 1904. 



45 



4. Fine ^ Art and Industrial 

School of the City of 
Kyoto — 

Drawing from copies (by stu- 
dents of first year course). 

Flower and insects drawn from 
nature (by students of first 
year course of drawing sec- 
tion). 

Sketch drawn from nature (by 
students of second year course 
of drawing section). 

Figures drawn from the given 
problems (by students of third 
year course of drawing sec- 
tion). 

Figures drawn from nature (by 
students of post-graduates of 
drawing section). 

Design drawn from nature (by 
students of second year course 
of design section). 

Design with various figures (by 
students of third year course of 
design section). 

5. GirW Industrial School, Tokio 

( incorporated) — 

Models of ordinary Japanese gar- 
merit (sewing course). 

Miniature works of art : 

Crysanthemum pouch (sewing 
course). 

Creeping baby doll (sewing 
course). 

Lobster (sewing course). 

Turlx)t (sewing course). 

Flower of a flag plant (sewing 
course). 

Kachifukuro, a bag (sewing 
course). 



Table cover (knittmg course). 

Hand bag (knitting course). 

Jacket (knitting course). 

Stockings (knitting course). 

Silk braid (knitting course). 

Tablet (embroidery course). 

Screen (embroidery course). 

Basket of artificial flowers (arti- 
ficial flower course). 

Specimens showing process of 
manufacturing. 

Tablets of drawing (drawing 
course). 

Description of the school (for dis- 
tribution). 

]>rief description of the school (in 
tablet). 

6. Industrial Art School of Kaga- 

zva-ken, Kagawa-ken — 

Watches (with covers engraved). 

Cock for ornament. 

Tablet for ornament. 

Specimens of wood engraving, 
metal engraving (original de- 
sign). 

7. Industrial Art School, Toy- 

ama-ken — 

Statuette of Xiwo (a Buddhist 
deity). 

Cock for ornament. 

Flower vases. 

Flower vase and design (illus- 
trating the process of manu- 
facturing). 

8. Lacquer Work Apprentices' 

School of Aidcu, Fuku- 

shitna-ken — 
Travs. 
Cake vessels. 



46 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Cigarette cases. 

Cigar cases. 

Stand for flower vase. 

Flower stand. 

Round vessel for cakes. 

Cups. 

Designs. 

9. Lacquer Work School, estab- 
lished by the Lacquermen's 
Union of Shizuoka, Shi- 
ziioka-ken — 

Tablet showing the two processes 
of manufacturing lacquer ware 
and embossed gold ware. 

Trays. 

Boxes. 

Card trays. 

10. Nagoya Commercial School of 

the City of Nagoya — 

Photos and statistics in tablet. 
Specimens of pupils' work. 
Calendar of the school. 

11. Technical School of Ishika- 

7caken, Ishikawaken — 

Tablet showing the work of first- 
year students in designing and 
painting course. 

Tablet showing the work of sec- 
ond year students in designing 
and painting course. 

Tablet showing the work of 
third-year students in design- 
ing and painting course. 

Tablet showing the work of 
fourth year students in design- 
ing and painting course. 

Plate (first-year course, Ceramic 
Department). 



Cups and saucers for coffee (sec- 
ond year course. Ceramic De- 
partment). 

Flower vase (third year). 

Image of woman for ornament 
(first year). 

Plate (second year). 

Flower vase (third year). 

Figure of girl and cat for orna- 
ment (fourth year). 

Flower vase (joint work of stu- 
dents of various grades). 

GROUP 7. 

Edticotion of Defectives* 

I. Tokio Btind and Dumb 
School, Tokio — 

Kana typewriter for the blind. 
The 25-point and 36-point letter 

plates. 
Portable point letter plate. 
Reading of point letters. 
Spelling of point letters. 

Japanese constitution in point 
letters. 

Imperial rescript in point letters. 

Extract from physiology in point 
letters. 

Anatomy in point letters. 

Life of Hanawa Kengyo, a 
learned blind scholar who 
lived about 150 years ago, in 
point letters. 

Koto (a kind of harp). 

Instrument used in acupuncture. 

Photos. 

Drawing by dumb pupils. 

Explanatory account of the 
school. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



47 



GROUP 8. 

Special Forms of Edtscation — Text- 

BookSf School Furmtore and 

School Appliances* 

1. Central Meteorological Ob- 

servatory, Tokio — 
History of meteorological work^ 
in Japan. 

2. Earthquake Investigation 

Committee, Tokio — 
Reports of the committee. 
Maps showing earthquake dis- 
tricts. 
Vertical vibration measurer 
(bridge and railway car- 
riages). 



Instrument for measuring mi- 
nute vibration. 

Horizontal tremor recorder. 

3. Imperial Education Society, 
Tokio — 

Statistics of the Imperial Educa- 
tional Society of Japan. 

Statistics of library belonging to 
the Imperial Educational So- 
ciety of Japan. 

Table showing the various edu- 
cational societies in Japan. 

Short account of the Imperial 
Educational Society of Japan. 



48 Japanese Exhibition, 



CHAPTER II. 

Department of Art.* 

Introductory Remarks. 

General Remarks, — The fine arts of Japan, especially painting and 
architecture, originated in sources entirely independent of those of west- 
em countries. Consequently, the Japanese works of art possess many 
characteristics which bear no semblance of similarity to the products of 
western artists. Take the case of painting, for instanc**. Instead of 
producing the minute details of the object which he pictures, the Jap- 
anese artist lays stress upon the general appearance which he catches 
at the moment he has glanced at his object. It is not without reason 
that Occidental critics of art have often compared the Japanese painting 
to a poem and the Japanese artist to a poet. Like a poet, the artist of 
Japan employs his imagination, his ideal, and his aspiration in his work 
rather than to merely faithfully picture the real form and appearance 
of his object. Hence, the Japanese painting possesses gracefulness, 
delicacy and dignity, that can not be seen in Western painting. 

,As regards the Japanese art of carving, we find that it was in- 
fluenced by Buddhism, as the Greek sculptor underwent the influence of 
mythology. Like the" Greek sculptor who was absorbingly in- 
terested in producing the images of mythological deities, the effort of 
the Japanese carver was almost exclusively confined to the production 
of the sacred images of Buddha and his disciples. In the case of the 
latter, however, the free activity of the artist was somewhat hindered, 
as his only subject, the image of Buddha, did not admit of the unquali- 
fied exercise of his imagination. But in recent years the scope of 
activity of the Japanese carver has become broader. He now takes 
many and varied subjects for his work, and not a few of his products 
show an excellent expression of his imaginative power. 

Japanese architecture is also indigenous to Japan, without its coun- 
terpart in the Occident. Since the advent of Western customs in the 
Island Empire, the structure of Japanese buildings has received a con- 
siderable influence from W^estern architecture. 

/. Painting. 

With the introduction of Buddhism from the Asiatic Continent, 
the pictorial art of Qiina was imported to Japan. This is the firsi be- 
ginning of Japanese painting worthy of note, although previous to that 

*For art manufactures, compare the chapter on manufactures. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 49 

time there had existed an art of drawing indigenous to Japan. The 
adopted art from the Continent made such a rapid progress that in the 
latter part of the Ninth Century it produced a great artist in the person 
of Kanaoka Kose, who founded a school identified with his name. This 
school was especially prominent in painting the images of Buddha and 
such pictures as represent Buddhist ideas. 

In the course of the Tenth and Eleventh Centuries, a new idea of 
painting introduced certain modifications of the old style, leading to a 
formation of a style characteristic of Japan. The new style was called 
the Tosa School, and took as its subjects manners and customs prevail- 
ing among the court ladies and nobles. From the latter part of the 
Twelfth to the end of the Thirteenth Century, the subjects of painting 
became more varied, including among others such favorite subjects as 
wars and battles, temples and shrines, and the woe and weal of human 
life. Most of the products of this period are still to be found. 

Jktween the Fourteenth and Sixteenth Centuries, a new departure 
was made in the pictorial art as a result of the advent of Zen sect, a 
branch of Buddhism, in Japan. Along with its religious ideas, this sect 
imported the Chinese art of the So dynasty, which excelled in painting 
mountain^ and streams, flowers and birds, saints and other imaginary 
figures. At first this new school in Japan was famous for producing 
bold and conventional pictures. In time, however, it attained a state 
of remarkable delicacy and fineness. Among its advocates the most 
famous were Sessii, a Buddhist priest, who was the founder of a 
school called the Unkoku School; Meicho, another Buddhist priest, who 
had no equal in painting the images of the disciples of Buddha, and 
Masanobu Kano and Motonobu Kano, who founded another school 
known by their family name. 

The two schools, Tosa and Kano, stand most prominent 
in the Japanese History of painting. The Tosa School is famous for the 
fineness and delicacy of its work ; the Kano School, on the other hand, 
is without rivalry in the grandeur and magnificence of its products. 
In the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, certain artists belonging 
to the latter school inaugurated a new idea and endeavored to produce 
ornamental pictures which were applied to such art manufactures as 
'porcelain and the like. 

The end of the Eighteenth Century was made memorable by the 
introduction of the Chinese School of the Min and the Shin dynasty, 
which approached a realistic style of painting nearer than any preceding 
school. This new school branched off into the Xanso School and the 
Marnyama School, both of which excelled in painting landscapes, 
flowers, birds, and such like. 



so Japanese Exhibition, 

Besides these schools, there was a school called Ukiyoye, which 
was originated by Matabei Vnwasa, in the Seventeenth Century, and 
represents the popular or artisan school of art. Discarding the stiff 
conventionalities of the classical schools, the Ukiyoye artist devoted 
himself to the treatment of common themes and of subjects quaint and 
humorous. The printed reproductions of the original works of this 
school have become circulated very widely since the latter part of the 
Eighteenth Century. Among the prominent artists of this class are 
Moronobu, Siikenobu, Harunobu, Utamaro, and Hokusau 

European schools of painting were first introduced to Japan late in 
the Sixteenth Century. Between that time and the opening of Japan 
to international communication, western art made little progress. Fol- 
lowing the inauguration of the new regime, however, it entered another 
era in which it has made a gradual but steady progress. 

During the past twenty years Japanese painting has been recover- 
ing from injuries which it suflFered because of the many difficulties that 
Japan had to encounter for several ages previous and subsequent to 
her political regeneration. The government has been taking great care 
to encourage art by establishing art schools and by frequently holding 
art exhibitions. Oil painting and water color drawing have been im- 
proved considerably since the Technological University, which was 
affiliated with the Tokyo Imperial University, employed Western in- 
structors in drawing and painting. 

At present the different schools of the original Japanese art can 
hardly be distinguished from each other. The Tosa School is now 
almost extinct. The Kano School has almost lost its original style, 
although there are a few celebrated artists who still claim to belong to 
this school. The only school which preserves its original character- 
istics and style is the Maruyama School, founded by the famous Okio 
Maruyama. Its realistic style has been favored by the modem lovers 
of art. Among its present devotees may be found several prominent 
and promising artists. Next to the Maruyama School, the Nanso and 
the Ukiyoye School still occupy an important position. Beside these 
various schools descended from the artists of the olden times, certain 
artists have been striving to create new styles by modifying or har- 
monizing old schools. 

//. Can'ing and Sculpture, 

Like painting, the Japanese arts of carving and casting began to 
make rapid progress after the introduction of Buddhism, which neces- 
sitated the installation of the carved or cast images of Buddha. When 
Prince Shotoku (572-621), the Constantine of Japanese Buddhism, was 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 51 

erecting a large number of Buddhist temples and monasteries, there ap- 
peared several celebrated artists who devoted themselves exclusively to 
the carving of the images of Buddha. During the reign of the Em- 
peror Shomn in the Eighth Century, the art of carving and casting 
Buddha's images reached the highest degree of skill. The materials 
used were wood, bronze, clay and lacquer. This art originated in India, 
and was brought to Japan through China. The Japanese artist modi- 
fied its original ideas and in time produced a new style. Many of the 
works of this period are still found in existence. 

Since the Eighth Century the art of making holy images steadily 
progressed, and in the course of the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries 
many celebrated artists appeared in succession. In the Fourteenth and 
Fifteenth Century, the rise of the Zen sect gave birth to the carving of 
the images of Buddha's disciples in a large number. In the Seven- 
teenth Century the Chinese carving of the Min dynasty was imported 
to Japan, where it found a considerable number of advocates. 

Beside the holy images of Buddha and his disciples, the art-forms 
of this class involved masks, the inro and tobacco-pouch, and ornaments 
for various kinds of buildings. The application of this art to the 
making of masks was brought about by the prevalence of Biigaku, a 
species of lyric drama, in the Seventh and Eighth Centuries. The ap- 
pearance of Nogaku, a sort of pantomime dance, in the Fifteenth Cen- 
tury, stimulated the advancement of the art of mask carving to a 
greater extent. These masks were of varied kinds, quaint and queer, 
and made out of the imagination of their authors. Their favorite ma- 
terials were wood and lacquer. 

In the second half of the Seventeenth Century the inro and the 
tobacco-pouch became very common, resulting in time in the develop- 
ment of an art especially adapted to the making of such articles. The 
inro is a small medicine-box in segments, held together by means of a 
cord, to one extremity of which a netsuke, a kind of button, is attached, 
to be fastened to the belt or sash. These little articles — the inro, 
netsuke, tobacco-pouch, and the like — were carved out of wood, bam- 
boo, ivory, or horn, and have since developed into gems of art. 

Carvings ornamenting various kinds of buildings became promi- 
nent in the second half of the Sixteenth Century, when temples and 
monasteries were built in luxurious and elaborate style. The temple- 
gate and ex-voto hall, the oratory and corridor, the belfry and 
pagoda, and the main temple and priest's apartments, were all 
decorated with excellent carvings. The temples at Xikko show the 
most famous specimen of the arts of this period. Pillars and beams. 



52 Japanese Exhibition, 

panels and windows, were all decorated with the carvings of flowers 
and birds, dragons and holy birds, lions and tigers, and saints and other 
imaginary figures, all displaying an excellent skill and rare dexterity. 

Like painting, the art of carving and sculpturing sank into insig- 
nificance from the beginning to the latter part of the past century. 
During the last generation, however, this declining art has been re- 
gaining its prominence. As the inro, tobacco-pouch, and such like 
have become favored by foreigners, the carvers of Japan have been 
vying with each other to produce chefs-d'-oeuvre in such articles. 
Gradually, they have emerged from this restricted field, and at present 
their ivory works are of greatly varied kinds and forms. In the 
meantime, many factors have been at work to assist in the promotion 
of the art of carving. The Tokyo Art School inaugurated a course 
of carving, especially encouraging wood carving; the Art Association 
of Japan was organized : the formation of the Tokyo Carving Asso- 
ciation followed it, all co-operating to improve the work of carving. 

Meanwhile, the excellent quality of Occidental sculpture has be- 
come gradually recognized, creating a keen interest among artists in 
the realistic treatment of themes. This recognition exerted a con- 
siderable influence upon wood and ivory carving characteristic of Japan. 
Although wood carving is credited with many excellent artists, the 
volume of their work has been rather insignificant as compared with 
the works of ivory carving, which are in considerable demand in 
foreign countries. 

The young art of sculpture is now progressing in Japan with 
fresh energy and vigor, keeping pace with the advancement of carving. 
The Japanese sculpture, however, is greatly handicapped on account 
of the scarcity of marbles or other stones available for this art. Con- 
sequently, stone sculpture is still in a state of infancy. Sculptural 
works of small size have been frequently produced out of metals, 
their designs being formed for the sole purpose of ornamenting rooms. 

Carvings for the decoration of buildings are still confined to those 
for temples and shrines. There are very rare instances of ordinary 
dwellings ornamented with carvings. Even in buildings of Western 
style, decorative carvings are merely nominal. The characteristic 
Japanese carving of Tjuddhistic figures is now sadly neglected, being 
entirely left in the hands of insignificant artisans. Subjects for carv- 
ings and sculpture are at present sought in figures and facts in history 
or in animals. Mythological figures which stand prominent in West- 
ern sculpture do not form favorable themes for Japanese artists. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 53 

///. Architecture, 

Shrines and Temples. — The ancient buildings of Japan were crude 
and primitive. Some of the characteristics of the primitive hut can be 
still seen in Shinto shrines and temples, which undoubtedly developed 
from ancient forms of dwellings. 

The advent of Buddhism in Japan brought about the import of 
more elaborate styles of architecture of Buddhist temples and monas- 
teries from China and Korea. What are known as Kasuga-Zukuri, 
Nagare-Zukuri, and Yamtine-Zukuri, are products of the combination 
of Buddhist architecture from the continent with the original style 
of Japanese buildings. In the Eighth Century, the Buddhistic archi- 
tecture reached a considerable degree of perfection. 

Pagodas, three-storied, five-storied, or nine-storied, and round 
temples, were creations of this period, and are still regarded as the most 
artistic of the Japanese architectural accomplishments. In the Ninth 
Century, the Tahoto, or pagoda-shaped reliquary, and the Monjuto, a 
species of tower, were added to Buddhistic styles of architecture. 
The succeeding two centuries brought about a remarkable perfection 
of temple architecture. Temples vied with each other in beauty and 
grandeur. 

The appearance of the Zen sect, in the Twelfth Century, gave 
rise to new styles of Buddhist architecture in the forms of the Hojo, 
or priest's apartment, and the Shoin, or priest's reception room. In 
the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, the architectural form of 
monasteries and temples reached a still higher perfection, the carvings 
adding greatly to their beauty and magnificence. It was in this period 
that the Buddhistic architecture and that of Shinto were so combined 
and harmonized as to give birth to a unique new style of structure of 
which the Nikko temples and the temples of the East and West 
Hongii'anji at Kyoto are a few specimens. 

Palaces and Castles. — The architecture of the Japanese palaces 
was also imported from China in the Eighth Century. The dwellings 
of court nobles, known as the Shin den Zukuri, were also modeled 
after the Chinese architecture. In the Twelfth Century, military 
chiefs built their palaces in a style different from those of the dwellings 
of courtiers. This style was called the Buke-Zukuri. 

An harmonious combination of these two styles and the Buddhistic 
architecture of the Zen sect was realized in the Fifteenth Centurv, and 
was known as the Shoin-Zuktiri. The presence of an architectural 
style of the tea-room, called Sukiya-Zukuri, also dates from this period. 



54 



Japanese Exhibition, 



In the second half of the Sixteenth Century the feudal lords began 
to build their castles in a luxurious and elaborate style. The towers 
and palaces of these castles attained a considerable degree of grandeur. 

Modern Architecture. — At present, shrines and temples arc still 
modeled after the styles of olden days. The forms of dwellings which 
are common at present were also derived from the old Shoin-Zukuri 
and Sukiya-Zuktiri, 

The introduction of Western architecture has remodeled most 
public and office buildings in the more important towns after the Occi- 
dental forms of building. The advancement of the science of archi- 
tecture and of technical knowledge are co-operating to improve the 
art of building, both in the original and the Western style. 






Exhibits. 



GROUP 9. 

and Drawinfifs* 

Ando, Jubei, Nagoya — 

Bowl, cloisonne, made by 
Kawade Shibataro. 

Araki, Jippo, Tokio — 

1. Mandarin and Wild Ducks 
among Reeds in Lake: Au- 
tumn Scene. 

Araki, Kampo, Professor of the 
Tokio Fine Art School, and Im- 
perial Court Painter, Tokio — 

2. Pheasants on Rock by Lake: 

Autumn. 

Atomi, Madame Giokushi, Tokio — 

3. Chrysanthemums and Sparrows 

in Rain. 

Fukunaga, Kobi, Tokio — 

4. Picnic Party under Cherry 

Trees in Spring. 

Gejo, Masao, Tokio — 

5. Landscape in Snow with a 

Fisherman's Cottage. 



6. A Pair of Screens : Heron and 

Willow in Snow, and Crow 
and Pine. 

7. A Pair of Screens : Landscape, 

Bamboo Forest. 

Goseda, Horiu, Tokio — 

8. Poppy Field. 

9. A Quiet Mountain Stream. 

10. Mountain Village. 

Hashidate, Shisen, Tokio — 

11. Chrysanthemums and Birds. 

Hashimoto, Gaho, Imperial Court 
Artist, Tokio — 

12. Landscape: "Windy Day in 

Mountain." 

13. Landscape: "Twilight in 

Forest." 

14. Landscape: "Winter Morn- 

ing and Wild Ducks." 

15. Landscape: "Mount Horai 
and Sunrise." 

16. Landscape: "Mountain 

Stream in the Morning." 

17. Landscape: "Tinted Leaves 
and White Stream." 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



55 



i8-. landscape: "Spring and Au- 
tumn." A Pair of Screens. 

19. Landscape : "Rain and Snow." 
A Pair of Screens. 

Hata, Hoyei, Kioto — 

20. Portrait of Kishimojin 

(Hariti) with her Attend- 
ants. 

Hirai, Chukusiii, Osaka — 
2t. Peacock and Peahen. 

Hirose, Toho, Tokio — 

22. Flying Pheasant and Autumn 

Flowers. 

Hookabe, Kinshu, Tokio — 

23. Fashionable Young Lady of 
Fifty Years Ago. 

Itnao, Kcinen, Kioto — 

24. Spring Lespedeza and Group 
of Cock, Hen and Oiickens. 

25. Summer, Peonies and Birds. 

26. Autumn, Chestnut and Birds. 

27. Winter, Withered Flowers 

and Birds. 

Ito, Sadabumi, Tokio — 

Vase, lacquered on metal and 
inlaid with mother-of -pearls. 

Ishii, Sodo, Kioto — 

28. Carps at Play. 

Kanamori, Nanko, Tokio — 

29. Young Lady of the Present 

Period. 

Kanda, Bunsho, Kito — 
30- The Most Merciful Kwannon. 

Kawamura, Giokun, Tokio — 
31. Historical Picture: A Scene 
in the Life of Yoritomo, who 
Became the First Shogun of 
Japan. 



Kawabata, Giokusho, Professor of 
the Tokio Fine Art School and 
Imperial Court Artist, Tokio — 

32. Landscape: "Forest and 

Stream in Autumn." 

Kawai, Giokudo, Tokio — 

33. Landscape: "Autumn Scene 

in Mountain Valley." 

Katano, Hidemaru, Tokio — 

34. Japanese Kitchen of the Mid- 
dle Class. 

Kobayashi, Gokio, Tokio — 

35. Chrysanthemum and Fowls. 

Kobayashi, Mango, Tokio — 

36. Street Musicians. 

Kochi, Gagei, Tokio — 

37. Angels' Return to Heaven. 

Komiya, Tokei, Tokio — 

38. Carps at Play. 

Kubota, Kinsen, Tokio — 

39. Fish Market on Hokkaido 
Coast. A Pair of Screens. 

40. Spring: "Pine and Autumn." 
"Maple and Wagtails." A 
Pair of Screens. 

Matsubayashi, Keisiii, Tokio — 

41. Chrysanthemums and Group 
of Fowls. 

Mayeda, Madam Giokuyei, Kioto. 

42. Cock, Hen and Chicks Feed- 
ing. 

Missutani, Kunishiro, Tokio — 

43. Doirs Festival. 

44. Landscape: Return of the 
Junks. 

Mori, Shungaku, Kioto — 

45. Landscape: Mountain and 

Stream. 



56 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Morohoshi, Seisho, Tokio — 

46. Mother Owl Feeding Young. 

Muramatsu, Ungai, Kioto — 

47. Crow and Pine in Snow. 

Mnrase, Giokudcn, Tokio — 

48. The Flower of the Spring: 
"Cherry and Ducks." 

49. The Flower of the Autumn: 
"Qirysanthemums." 

Nagahara, Kotaro, Tokio — 

50. Young Nurse after a Dragon 

Fly. 

Xakada, Shokioj Tokio — 

51. Cock and Hen under Bamboo 
and Roses. 

Xakamura, Kinjo, Tokio — 

52. Bird, Rock and Peony. 

Xakazawa, Hiromitsit, Tokio — 

53. A Hakone Mountain Chair. 

Xoguchi, SuiuHj Tokio — 

54. Lonely Duck among Reeds in 
Lake. 

Nomura, Bunkio, Tokio — 

55. Kiyomizu Temple in Snow. 

56. Arashiyama in Rain. 

Ogata, Gekko, Tokio — 

57. Pleasure Boat on Sumida in 
Cherxv Season. 

Ohaslii, Suiseki — 

58. Tiger, a Pair of Screens. 
Oka, Voshiyc, Tokio — 

59. Water Wheel. 

Okazaki, Scssei, Tokio — 

Vase, bronze decoration of 

badger in relief. 
Vase, bronze decoration of 
carp in relief. 



\'ase, bronze decoration of 
sea waves in relief. 

\'ase. bronze decoration of 
gourd leaves in relief. 

Ornamental bronze stand, two 
carps. 

Okada, Saburosukc, Tokio — 

60. A Kioto Dancing Girl. 

61. A Tokio Dancing Girl. 

Oshita, Tojiro, Tokio — 

62. A Japanese Garden in Au- 
tumn. 

63. A Forest in the Evening. 

Otakc, Chikufia, Tokio — 

64. True Heart, Mother and Chil- 

dren. 

Sato, Shiyen, Tokio — 

65. Peacock, Peahen and Pine. 
Exhibited bv Kahichi Xozuve, 
Tokio. 

Sekida, Katci, Tokio — 

66. Chrysanthemums and Birds. 

Shimasakt, Ritta, Tokio — 

67. Devoted Heart: Grand-daugh- 
ter decorating Grandmother's 
Hair with Flowers. 

Shimidsu, Toyo, Tokio — 

68. Landscape: Fuji in Distance 
and Pines in Foreground. 

Shirataki, Ikunosukc, Tokio — 

69. Two School Girls. 

70. (iirls' Music Rehearsal. 

Shoito, Sonosukc, Tokio — 

71. Old Woman at Needle Work. 
y2. A Persimmon Tree. 

Suzuki, Shoscn, Kioto — 
73. Landscape: Pines in Fore- 
ground and Mountains in 
Distance. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



57 



Takashima, Hokkai, Tokio — 

74. Landscape: Rocky Mountain 

near Yellow Limestone. 

Exhibited by Shinzo Takata, 

Tokio. 
76. Landscape: Rocky Mountains 

near Lake MacDonald. 

Exhibited by Shinzo Takata, 

Tokio. 

Takashima, Shin, Tokio — 

78. The Shrine of the Second To- 
kugawa Shogun in Shida 
Park. 

Takahashi, Giokuyen, Tokio — 

79. Landscape: Cottage Among 

Pines with Mountains in Dis- 
tance. 

Takano, Riodo, Tokio — 

80. The Perfume of Flowers, 

Mother and Two Daughters. 

Umcmtira, Kcican, Kioto — 

81. Hawk and Reeds in Snow. 

UtagauHJ, Kuniminc, Tokio — 

82. Bride of the Good Old Davs. 

Uyeda, Manshu, Kioto — 

83. Fighting Cocks. 

Uxemtira, Madam Shoyen, Kioto — 

84. Group of Three Ladies by 
Cherry Tree Dressed in 
Spring Fashion of Hundred 
Years Ago. 

ll'ada, Vcisakii, Tokio — 

85. Portrait of a Young Lady. 

jyatananabc, Seitci, Tokio — 

86. Lotus and Duck in Autumn. 

Exhibited bv Kahichi Nozuve, 
Tokio. 



Yamamoto, Morinosuke, Tokio — 

87. Landscape: A Mountain after 

Rain in Late Autumn. 

Yamamoto y Shunkio, Kioto — . 

88. Landscape: Hodsugawa in 

Rain. 

89. Wistaria and Bird. 

Yasaki, Chiyoji — 

90. Portrait, oil painting. 

Yoshida, Hiroshi, Tokio — 

91. Landscape: Cherry Trees by 

Morning Light. 

92. Landscape: Lotus Pond by 

Evening Light. 

Yuasa, Ichiro, Tokio — 

93. A Village Maid at Rest. 

94. Landscape: Winter Cold and 

Barren. 

GROUP 11. 

Sculpture* 

Abe, Insai, Tokio — 

95. Child chasing a Dragon Fly. 

Bronze. 

Honbo, Gitaro, Tokio — 
0. A Farmer. Bronze. 

InouCy Seisukc, Fuktioka — ' 

97. A Wood Cutter. Terra cotta. 

Ishii, Kihyoye, Tokio — 

98. A Young Elephant. Bronze. 

99. A Mother and Child. Bronze. 

Kaneda, Kancjiro, Tokio — 

100. Grandmother and Grandson. 
Bronze. 

loi. Hard at Work — Grandfather 
and Granddaughter ploughing. 
Bronze. 

102. A Wood Cutter. Bronze. 



.J 



58 



Japanese Exhiiution, 



103. Old Woman lighting Candle. 
Bronze. 

104. Fisherman Coming Home. 
Bronze. 

105. A Hunter. Ivory. 

106. Old Woman sweeping. Ivory. 

107. Farmer blowing Dust from 
Kice. Ivory. 

Mikazva, Kozaburo, Tokio — 

108. Skull, Large. Ivory. 

109. Skull, Small. Ivory. 

Mori, Hoseij Tokio — 
no. Statue of Chigusa Tadaaki, 
the Famous Archer. Wood. 

Mnrata, Kichigoro, Tokio — 

111. Angler. Ivory. 

112. Grandfather playing with his 
Pet Grandson. Ivory. 

Omachi, Yeijiro, Tokio — 

113. Wood-cutter enjoying a 
Drink. Ivory. 

Toyama, Choco, Tokio — 

114. Angel. Ivory. 

115. Old Fisherman. Ivory. 

116. Old Sower. Ivorv. 

Udagazva, Kazuo, Tokio — 

117. Young Mother at Luncheon. 
Bronze. 

JVatanabc, Osao, Tokio — 
it8. Farmer making Rice Bag. 
Bronze. 

Yakushiji, Konn, Tokio — 

119. Statue of a Girl with Book. 
Plaster. 

Yamasaki, Chonn, Tokio — 

120. Cowboy with Milk Pail. 
Bronze. 

121. Young Boy at Play. Bronze. 

Yonehara, Unkai, Tokio — 

122. Courtesy. Wood. 



GROUP 12. 
Architecture* 

Morita, Ichigoro, Toyama — 

123. Design for a Gate, with 
Chrysanthemum Decoration, 
showing Front. 

124. The Same, showing the Side, 
with the Ground Plan of the 
Gate. 

Sasaki, Iwajiro, Tokio — 

125. Design for the Private Resi- 
dence of Air. S. Asano in 
Tokio. 

GROUP 14- 

Orisfinal Objects of Art Work- 
manship* 

Akatsuka, Zittoku, Tokio — 

126. A Hand Box, Decoration of 
Pine Trees and Storks. 

AndOj Jubei, Nagoya — 

127. Pair of Vases, Cloisonne, 
decorated with Plum Blos- 
soms. 

128. Pair of Vases, Cloisonne, 
decorated with Wistaria. 

129. Cigar Box, Cloisonne dec- 
orated with Peacock Feather. 

130. Pair of Vases, Cloisonne, dec- 
orated with Ivy Vines. 

13 1. Pair of Vases, Cloisonne, dec- 
orated with Bamboo and 
Fowls, Maples and Pigeons. 

132. Cake Tray, Cloisonne, made 
in shape of Lotus Leaf, dec- 
orated with a Dragon Fly. 

T33. Vase, Cloisonne, decorated 

with Hosta Coerulea. 
134. Vase, Cloisonne, decorated 

with Chinese Scroll Design. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



59 



Fujikazca, Shhizo, Kagazva — 

135. Cake Box, carved and paint- 
ed in Zokoku Style, Floral 
and Scroll Design. 

Fujiivara, Ihyoye, Osaka — 

136. Carved Ornamental Center 
Table. 

137. Paper Box and Writing Box 
and Writing Table, Land- 
scape of Yoshino. 

138. Incense Box, decorated with 
Wooden Fish Bell and Priest's 
Dusting Brush. 

Funabashi, Iwajiro, Tokio — 

139. Hand Box, Landscape, Ara- 
shiyama in Autumn Rain and 
Omura in Spring. 

Funakoshi, Shunviin, Tokio — 

140. Vase, Shibuichi Body, Silver 
Mouth and Shakudo Feet Or- 
namented with the Design of 
Pigeons, Maple Tree and the 
Sun. 

Hat tori, Tadasaburo, Nagoya — 

141. Vase, Cloisonne, decorated 
with Plum Leaves. 

142. Vase, Cloisonne, decorated 
with Nuphaea Japonica. 

143. Vase, Cloisonne, decorated 
with Flowers. 

144. Vase, Cloisonne, decorated 
with Plum Blossoms. 

145. Vase, Cloisonne, decorated 
with Hydrangea. 

Hayashi, Ktihyoyc, Tokio — 

146. Panel Landscape, Beach in 
the Morning. 

Hayashi, Jisaburo, Ishikazua — 

147. Vase, Porcelain, Wistaria dec- 
oration over the Glaze. 



148. V^ase, Porcelain, Landscape 
Decoration over the Glaze. 

Hirano, Kichibei, Kioto — 

149. Pair of Vases, Green Bronze, 
Ornamented with a Conven- 
tional Peony Design. 

Hi rata, Akiho, Tokio — 

150. Designs for Dyeing. Ivy De- 
sign. 

lida, ShinsKichi, Kioto — 

151. Wall Hanging, Yusen Dyed 
Cut Velvet, Wild Ducks on 
Sea. 

152. Wall Hanging, Yuzen Dyed 
Cut Velvet, the Rapids at 
Night. 

153. Wall Hanging, Embroidery, 
Crows in Snow. 

154. Panel, Embroidery, Green 
Forest. 

155 W'all Hanging, Embroidery, 
Lion. 

156. Wall Hanging, Embroidery, 
Peacock. 

Ikcda, Gisuke, Fukui — 

157. Carved Rectangular Stand. 

Ikcda, Scisuke, Kioto — 

158. Bowl, Satsuma Pottery. 
Chrysanthemum Decoration, 
over the Glaze. 

159. Writing Box, Incense Cten- 
sils and Autumn Flowers. 

Imperial Japanese Comm ission . 
Tokio — 
ifw. Writing Table and Writing 
Box, Landscape Decoration 
on Gold Ground. 
161. Paper Box and Writing Box, 
Landscape Decoration on "Hi- 
rame Nashiji.'* 



6o 



Japankse ExHir.ITlON, 



162. Paper Box and Writing Box, 
Scattered Fans, Decoration on 
Polished Black Lacquer 
Ground. 

163. Decorated Cabinet, Scattered 
Fans, made by Several Cele- 
brated Lacquer Artists. 

I to, Tozan, Kioto — 

164. Vase, Pottery, Wistaria Dec- 
oration, under the Glaze in 
White. 

Japan Fine Art Association, To- 
kio — 

165. Small Tea Jar, Bird's Feath- 
er Decoration, in the Polished 
Lacquer made by Shosai Shi- 
rayama of Tokio. 

Jiomi, Veisuke, Kioto — 

166. Incense Burner, Bronze, 
Dragon. 

167. Vase, Bronze, Winter Forest 
and Crows. 

168. Cigar Box, Yellow Bronze, 
Landscape. 

Kagaiva, Katsuhiro, Tokio — 

169. Hanging Placque, Bronze, 
ornamented with Herons and 
\Villow Trees by River. 

Kanamori, Shichiro, Toyama — 

170. Vase, Bronze, Three Geese 
m one group. 

171. Vase^. Bronze, ornamented 
with Two Elephants. 

Kanamori, Tohei, Toyawa — 

172. Incense Burner, Bronze, or- 
namented with Sea Birds. 

Kataoka, Gcnjiro, Tokio — 

173. Small P>ox, Inlaid Mother-of- 
Pearl Decoration of Fans on 
Polished Black Lacquer 
Ground. 



174. Hand Box, Inlaid Mother-of- 
Pearl Decoration of Circular 
Phoenix, on Polished Black 
Lacquer Ground. 

Kazvara, Taro, Aiciti — 

175. X'ase, Porcelain, decorated 
with Water Plant. 

176. V^ase, Porcelain, decorated 
with Grapes. 

177. Vase, Porcelain, decorated 
with Japonica Petasites. 

178. Vase, Porcelain, Decoration 
of Water and Maple Leaves. 

179. Vase, Pottery, with Decora- 
tion of Morning Glory. 

Kazvashima, Jubei — 

179A. Mongolian Invasion, tapes- 
try. 

Kinkozan, Sobei, Kioto — 

180. \'ase. Pottery, carved Orna- 
mentation of Chrvsanthe- 
mums. 

18 T. Vase, Pottery, carved and 
pierced Ornamentation. 

182. Vase, Pottery, carved and 
pierced Ornamentation of 
Plum Trees in Blossom. 

Kioto Pottery and Porcelain Co,, 
Kioto — 

183. \'ase. Pottery, carved and 
pierced Ornamentation of Pe- 
ony Flowers. 

Kioto Society for the Encourage- 
ment of Fine Arts, Kioto — 

184. Paper l>ox and Writing 
Box, Spring Landscape Dec- 
orations, Exhibited by Naoyu- 
ki Kumagai in behalf of the 
Society. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



61 



KumanOy Teitaro, Nagoya — 

185. Vase, Cloisonne, decorated 
with Begonia. 

186. Vase, Cloisonne, decorated 
with Two Carps. 

187. Vase, Cloisonne, decorated 
with Two Carps. 

188. Vase, Cloisonne, decorated 
with Two Carps. 

i8y. Vase, Cloisonne, decorated 
with Two Carps. 

Kurokaiva, Yeisho, Tokio — 

190. \^ase, Shibuichi, Grapes Re- 
pousse. 

Matsubayashi, Sadashichi, Osaka — 

191. Incense Tray, Decoration of 
Chrvsanthemums and Paulo- 
nia. 

Mikamiy Jisaburo, Kioto — 

192. Hand Box, Autumn Grass 
and Country Cottage. 

Mikanii, Koaaburo, Kioto — 

193. Hand Box, Bamboo (jrove. 

Miyagaiva, Kocan, Imperial Court 
Artist, Kanazawa — 

194. Vase, Porcelain, decorated 
with Plum Tree and a Line 
of Poetr\'. 

195. \'ase, Porcelain, decorated 
with Hydrangea. 

ic)6. \'ase, Porcelain, decorated 
with Chrysanthemum. 

197. Vase, Porcelain, covered with 
Crvstalized Bronze. 

198. Vase, Porcelain, covered with 
Crvstalized Bronze Glaze. 

199. Vase, Porcelain, Dragon Dec- 
oration. 

200. \'ase, Porcelain, Pine Tree 
Decoration. 



201. Vase, Porcelain, Transmuta- 
tion Glaze. 

Mukai, Skigataro, Tokio — 

202. Peacock and Peahen, Shi- 
bnichi. 

Murata, Kinbci, Tokio — 

203. Pair of Vases, Silver, orna- 
jnented with the Incrusted 
and Inlaid Pictures of Sumi- 
voshi Beach and Arashivama. 

Xagaoka, Matakichi, Tokio — 

204. Incense Burner, Satsuma Fai- 
ence, decorated with Medal- 
lions of Phoenix and Pierced 
Basket Work, made by Ma- 
sataro Keida, of Kagoshima, 
Satsuma. 

205. Vase, Porcelain, decorated 
with Landscape Made by 
Tomotaro Kato, of Tokio. 

Xakamiira, Sakujiro, Tokio — 

206. Decorative Cabinet, Decora- 
tion of Autumn Flowers and 
Birds. 

Xamikazva, Vasuxuki, Kioto — 

207. \'ase. Cloisonne, decorated 
with Flowers and Brocade 
Design. 

Xaniikazva, Sositkc, Imperial Court 
Artist, Tokio — 

208. Panel, Wireless Cloisonne, 
decorated with Mount Fuji. 

209. Panel, Wireless Cloisonne, 
decorated with Reeds and 
Wild Ducks. 

210. Panel, Wireless Cloisonne, 
decorated with the Cloud and 
the M(X)n. 



' 



62 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Nakamura, Kinnosuke, Tokio — 

211. Small Box, Dragon and 
Cloud Decoration, made by 
Yiikio Yiikio, of Tokio. 

212. Hand Box, Peony Decora- 
tion, Made bv the same Ar- 
tist. 

Nishimnra, Sozaycmon, Kioto — 

213. Wall Hanging, Embroidery, 
Warm Spring Day, Cherry 
Blossom and Sheep. 

214. Screen, Embroidery, Pine 
Tree and Storks. 

215. Screen, Yiizen Dyed Cut Vel- 
vet, Wild Ducks and Mo<3n. 

216. Panel, Embroidery, Spring. 

217. Panel, Embroidery, Summer. 

218. Panel, Embroidery, Autumn. 

219. Panel, Embroidery, Winter. 

Nishiniura, Jihyoye, Kioto — 

220. Screen, F«rr« Dyed Silk 
Beauties of the Four Seasons. 

221. Wall Hanging, Brocade, a 
Scene of Airing and Drying. 

Okazaki, Scssei, Tokio — 

222. Ornamental Water Basin, 
Green Bronze, ornamented 
with a Dragon. 

Osaka Bronze Co., Osaka — 

223. Mantis, Gold. 
SaitOy Masakichi, Tokio — 

224. Group of Geese, Silver. 

225. Hand Box, Decorations of 
Open Fan. 

Sano, Kashichi, Tokio — 

226. Writing Table, Paper Box 
and Writing Box, Flower 
Decoration made bv Shosai 
Shiravama, of Tokio. 



Shima, Sahioye, Osaka — 

227. \^ase, Bronze, Waves Dec- 
oration. 

228. Vase, Bronze, Gold Fishes. 

229. Vase, Bronze, Court Ladies 
in Field gathering Young 
Pine Trees. 

Shinomnra, Tamashiro, Kioto — 

230. Designs for Dyeing. Floral 
Designs. 

Shiogaki, Rihei, Toyama — 

231. Incense box, Guribori, Lac- 

quer. 
23 1 A. Incense Box. 

Shoawi, Katsuyoshi, Kioto — 

232. Incense Burner, Iron, Wag- 
tail and Reeds. 

233. Tray, Shibuichi, Winter 
Scene, Pine Trees and Birds. 

234. Vase, Shibuichi, ^loming 
Scene, Crows Flying. 

235. \'ase, Copper Bronze, Demon 
Expeller. 

236. V'ase, Shibuichi, Bamboo in 
Snow. 

Suzuki, Chokichi, Imperial Court 

Artist, Tokio — 

237. Bear with Salmon, Bronze. 

238. Tiger, Bronze. 

Takayawa, Vosokiclii, Kioto — 

239. Table Cover, Woven, Butter- 
flies and Flowers of Four 
Seasons. 

Takaxama, Yoshikichi, Kioto — 

240. Design for Table Cover. 

Takata, Shiuco, Tokio — 

241. Panel, Iron, Ascending 
Dragon, made by Shinkio 
Tsukada, Tokio. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



63 



Takito, Manjiro, Aichi — 

242. Vase, Porcelain, decorated 
with Carved Leaves under 
Celadon Glaze. 

243. Vase, Porcelain, decorated 
with Carved Scroll Design 
under Celadon Glaze. 

244. Vase, Porcelain, decorated 
with Scroll Design in Blue 
under Glaze. 

Tanaka & Co,, Osaka — 

245. Hand Box, Decoration of At- 
sumori playing Flute on Suma 
Beach. 

Tanaka, Rishichi, Kioto — 

246. Panel, Embroidery, Pine Tree 
and Monkey. 

247. Panel, Embroidery, Peacock. 

248. Panel, Yuzen Dyed Cut Vel- 
vet, Group of Three Girls. 

Terabayashi, Katai, Kioto — 

249. Vase, Porcelain, decorated 
with Horse painted in Blue 
Colors under Glaze. 

250. V^ase, Porcelain, Covered 
with Crystalized Glaze. 

Tomita, Koshichi, Kioto — 

251. Hand Box, Decoration of 
Ferns, lacquered and Painted 
by Nakaochi of Kioto. 

Torii, Veitaro, Kioto — 

252. Table Cover, Yuzen Dyed 
Silk, Flowers of Spring and 
Autumn. 

Tsnjimtira, Shoka, Tokio — 

253. Screen Decoration of Airing 
and Night scene. 

Tsukamoto, Jinbei, Nagoya — 

254. Vase, Cloisonne, decorated 
with Flowers. 



255. Pair of Vases, decorated with 
Bamboos. 

Uno, Jinwatsu, Kioto — 

256. Vase, Porcelain, decorated 
with Lotus Under Tea Color 
Glaze. 

257. Vase, Porcelain, made in 
. shape of Bamboo and covered 

with Crvstalized Green Glaze. 

258. Vase, Porcelain, decorated 
with Dragon and covered with 
Mustard Glaze. 

Uyeno, Seiko, Kioto — 

259. Design for Wall Paper. 

Yabu, Mcizan, Osaka — 

260. Bowl, Satsuma Pottery, dec- 
orated with Small Figures and 
Flowers. 

261. Bowl, Satsuma Pottery, dec- 
orated with Festival Scene. 

Yamada, Chosaburo, IshikaiK^a — 

262. Vase, Iron, Waves. 

263. Lion and Lioness, Iron. 

264. Monkey, Iron. 

Yauagiwara, Tsunehiro, Shi mane — 

265. Hanging Panel, Mosaic of 
Kwannon on Rock before 
Waterfall. 

266. Hanging Panel, Mosaic of 
Birds and Flowers. 

Yokoyama, Akira, Ishikawa — 

267. Carved Writing Box, The 
Pine Trees of Sumivoshi 
Beach, carved by Aikawa To- 
yo of Kanazawa in I shika wa- 
ken. 

Znnicho, Sadakiclii, Tokio — 

268. Design for Lacquer Fire 
Screen. 



64 Japanese Exhibition, 



CHAPTER III. 
Department of Liberal Arts. 

Introductory Remarks, 

Printing. — The origin of Japanese printing goes back to the be- 
ginning of the Seventh Century, when Buddhist sutras were first 
printed in Japan. Since the Fourteenth Century, the classical works 
of China have been reprinted in a considerable volume. In the latter 
part of the Seventeenth Century, the reproduction of the Ukiyoye paint- 
ings began to prevail, and greatly assisted in the advancement of the 
art of printing. The type employed was made of wood, and was 
either movable or immovable. Movable wood type has been used since 
the ancient ages; movable metal type, however, was made in 1616 for 
the first time, the material used being copper. 

The advent of the movable lead type in Japan dates from 1851, 
and its advantages were soon recognized. The method of manufac- 
turing them has continued to improve; diflfereht styles of characters 
have been made more easily, and the art of printing has advanced 
to such a state of perfection that Japan is now able to rival the Western 
countries in the volume and quality of her printing. According to the 
statistics of 1902, there were 201 printing establishments and type 
foundries, exclusive of small establishments which do not employ steam 
or electric engines. The total number of employes of printing shops 
and type foundries, inclusive of small establishments, was estimated 
at 10,885. 

Copper-plate printing, together with the Western art of painting, 
was brought to Japan by the Dutch late in the Eighteenth Century, 
and continued to improve until at the beginning of the new era, when 
the Government employed it in printing paper money. Soon after that 
the Government established a printing factory with thoroughly modern 
equipments, which has since served as the model printing establishment 
in Japan. Lithography was adopted at the beginning of the new era, 
and has since attained to a considerable degree of perfection. 

The art of reproducing paintings, by means of wood-cut engraving, 
advanced rapidly after the beginning was made with the printing of 
Ukiyoye pictures in the latter part of the Seventeenth Century. At 
first this art was applied only to monochrome pictures, black or red. 
Since the middle of the Eighteenth Century, however, a method of 
printing paintings in polychrome has been adopted. The Nishikiyc, 
or printed color-painting, shows the skill and dexterity realized in this 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 65 

art several scores of years ago. In recent years the reproduction of 
old and classical paintings by means of this method has become very 
popular. Some very complex paintings have been reproduced, each 
by a process involving over one hundred printed impressions. The 
reproduction thus made can be distinguished from its original only 
after a close observation. This art has, indeed, no equivalent in any 
other country. 

Photography, which made its first appearance in Japan some forty 
years ago, has since achieved a wonderful progress^ and is now almost 
able to rival that of Western countries. The art of reproducing photo- 
graphs has also advanced to a remarkable degree. 

The progress on these lines of printing has swelled the volume of 
printed matter to a great extent. In 1901, some 18,990 volumes of 
books and booklets were printed, beside 1,181 periodicals and news- 
papers. 

Medical Science, — Japan can justly boast of the especially rapid 
advancement she has made in a comparatively short period in the 
art of healing human disease. Most medical instruments and ap- 
paratus are now made at home as finely as in any advanced country in 
the West, and several new instruments have been invented by Japanese 
medical scholars. According to the statistics of 190 1, the manufacturing 
chemists numbered 2,585, and the number of druggists and apothe- 
caries stood at 24,224. Several effective medicines have also been 
invented and discovered. 

Chemical Manufactures. — The manufacture of various chemical 
articles has considerably advanced, both in quality and quantity. The 
manufacture of matches and soaps deserves special note. Matches 
were first made in Japan in 1876, and, three years later, safety matches 
were invented. By the year 1880, the output of matches was so in- 
creased that the import of foreign matches was well-nigh stopped. In 
1888, the association of match manufacturers was formed for the pur- 
pose of improving the quality of matches, since when the output of 
matches has been so increased that they now form one of the important 
exports of Japan. 

The following table gives the figures of the output and export of 

matches for three years : 

Outputs Export 

Volume. Value. Volume. Value. 

(Gross.) (Yen.) (Gross.) (Yen.) 

rgoo 21,354,801 S.886,388 19,317,994 5,760,869 

1901 32,901,319 9,266,689 24,909,621 7,402,868 

1902 27,400,508 8,608,571 27,290,831 8,169,966 



66 Japanese Exhibition, 

The centers of match manufacture are the Hiogo' Prefecture and 
Osaka. The produce in the former was valued at 5,954,888 yen, and 
that of the latter at 1,695,808 yen, in the year 1901. Next to these 
places come the Prefecture of Aichi and of Hiroshima, and Tokyo. 

The exports of soaps is as follows: 

Toilet Soap. Wash Soap. 

Volume. Value. Volume. Value. 

(Gross.) (Yen.) (Gross.) (Yen.) 

1900 464,405 137,296 612,959 33,151 

1901 697,694 211,852 1,091,166 54.614 

1902 5i9»597 172,150 623,649 29,256 

Paper Manufacture, — The manufacture of paper in Japan began 
as early as the Sixth Century. During the Middle Ages this industry^ 
made a remarkable progress, and exquisitely fine papers of greatly 
varied kinds were produced, Hosho, Torinoko, Mino, Kosugi, Ganpu 
and Kashiwabara, being some of the important varieties. Daintily or- 
namented papers were also produced. The materials used are the 
skins and fibers of various plants, of which the Koji makes the best 
quality of paper. The centers of paper manufacture are Tosa, Mino, 
Yuwami and Suruga. 

The native Japanese paper is entirely different from that of 
foreign countries in its process of manufacture and its materials, and 
has many characteristic qualities for which Western papers have no 
equivalent. It is soft but strong, fine but elastic and durable. Hence, 
our papers furnish fine materials for panels and screens, lanterns and 
parasols, fans and scrolls, and many other things. The superior 
qualities of our papers have been recognized by foreigners, and such 
papers as Usuyo, Hosho, and napkin papers, have long been prized in 
foreign countries. 

The method of manufacturing Western papers was imported to 
Japan about 1872. Following the example set by the Government 
Printing Department, many paper manufacturers commenced to make 
paper after the Western method. Ornamented hand-made papers 
possessing durable quality have been lately produced by several fac- 
tories. 

Factories of original Japanese papers are generally on a small 
scale, the work being almost exclusively done by hand. Hence the 
number of work shops was as large as 63,914 in 1902. 

On the other hand, the production of Western papers is carried 
on on a large scale by means of power engines. In 1902, the number 
of paper manufacturing companies of this class was 12; that of fac- 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



67 



tones and workshops, 82, with 75 engines of 16,163 horsepower in all; 
the aggregate amount of capital being 8,471,775 yen. The volume of 
output in the same year was 102,143,195 pounds, valued at 7,150,024 
yen. 



The following table shows the amount and 
various papers for two years : 

Volume. 
Kinds of 1901. 

paper. (PoundJ 

Western paper 1,840,560 

Ganpi 26,146 

Wall Paper-. 

Torinoko 45,595 

Usuyo 402,124 

T^oyo 437,974 

Paper napkin 127,428* 

Others 



Total 



value of outputs of 



Value. 



1902. 


1901. 


1902. 


(Pound.) 


(Yen.) 


(Yen.) 




251,898 


240,945 


19,566 


22,972 


15,087 




76,089 


103,603 


204,095 


41,982 


156,775 


385,100 


328,324 


283,257 


516,777 


140,518 


145,633 


149,646* 


153,752 


188,298 




640,765 


651,990 



1,659,300 1,785,580 



*Unit of M sheets. 



Exhibits. 

NOTE: — The entire exhibits belonging to the Department of Liberal Arts, 
except No. 1, Group 15, are installed in the Palace of Manufactures. 



GROUP 15* 
Typography. 

1. Hoshiy Hajime, Tokyo — 

Apparatus of Japanese newspa- 
per printing. 

2. Kokkwasha, Yazaemon-cho, 

Kyohashi-ku, Tokyo — 

Colored printing on wood. 

3. Yasuike, KeizaburOj Tsuki- 

jima, Kyobashi-ku, Tokyo — 

Printing on tin plate. 

4. Yoshikawa, Hanshichi, Kyo- 

bosh-ku, Tokyo — 

Picture frames. 



GROUP 16. 
Pliotosfraphy. 

I. Asakura Gensuke, 
Ken — 

Photographs. 



Niigata- 



2. Asanuma, Shokwai, Hon-cho, 

Nikonbashi-ku, Tokyo — 

Cameras. 

3. Ichida Sola, Moto-machi, 

Kobe— 

Photographs. 

4. Kanai Yaichi, Niigata-Ken — 
Photographs. 



68 



Japanese Exhibition, 



5. Kwansai, Photograph and 

Printing Co., Futatabi-suji, 
Kobe— 

Photc^raph printing. 

6. Nagasawa Kiyosuke, Hana- 

saki-cho, Yokohama — 

Albums. 

7. Matsunaga Gakuro, Nigiwai- 

cho, Yokohama — 

Photographs. 
Photograph album. 

8. Midztino, Hanbei, Minami-ota- 

machi, Yokohama — 

Photograph frames. 
Photograph book case. 

9. Mikami Takatoshi, Kyomachi- 

bori-dori, Osaka — 

Photographs. 

10. Mitsumura Riso, Kitanagasa- 

dori, Kobe — 

Photographs. 

11. Miyata Totaro, Bent^n-dori, 

Yokohama — 

Album. 

12. Miyauchi Ryosnke, Nihon- 

bashi-tori, 4 Chome, Tokyo — 

Photograph frames. 
Photograph book. 

^3' Ogawa Isshin, Hiyoshi-cho, 
Kyobashi-ku, Tokyo — • 

Photographs. 
Photograph album. 
Photograph printing books. 

14. Photograph Postal Card Co., 
Benten-dori, Yokohama — 

Photograph postal cards. 



15. Sugiyama Shiunzo, Sioi-cho, 

Yokohama — 
Photograph album. 

16. Tamamura Yasusaburo, Ben- 

ten-dori, Yokohama — 

Photograph frames. 

17. Yeminami Nobusaburo, Ben- 

ten-dori, Yokohama — 

Photograph frames. 

Photograph opera case. 

Opera photographs and eye-glass. 

18. Yokohama Shashinkwai, Ota- 

machi, Yokohama — 

Photograph frames. 

GROUP !?• 

Books and Publications — ^Book 
Binding:* 

1. Fujii Magobei, Gokomachi- 

dori, Kyoto — 

Picture books: 

Jyakuchu "Gafu." 
' Miyakonohana." 
Shomeika Kacho Gafu." 

*'Shomeika Sansui Gafu." 

"Shoyen Bijin Gafu.'* 

"Miyako Hakkei." 

"Fuso Gakan." 

2. • Furukazva, Teinosuke, Son- 

esaki, Osaka — 
Pictures. 

3. Hasegawa Takejiro, Hon- 

mura-cho, Yotsuya-ku, To- 
kyo — 
Books. 

4. Kokkzvasha, Yazayemon-cho, 

Kyobashi-ku, Tokyo — 
"Kokkwa" in Japanese. 
"Kokkwa" in English. 



a 



ti{ 



International Exposition, St. L'ouis, 1904. 



69 



Wood-cut reproduction of pic- 
ture (Buddha). 

Wood-cut reproduction of pic- 
ture (flowers, birds and per- 
sons). 

5. Murakami Kanbei, Higashino- 

toin-dori, Kyoto — 

Picture books : 

Japanese customs, memory of the 

style in ancient times. 
Collection of postal cards, with 

picture. 
Picture book: 
Images of child. 
Seiho Shugacho. 
''Nanso Gayen." 

6. Shinbishoin, Nicho-machi, 

Shitayaku, Tokyo — 

Collection of pictures by Korin 
school. 

7. Tajima Shiichi, Shinbitaik- 

wan, Tokyo — 
Wood printing of "Kujyaku 
Myowo." 

8. Yamada Naosaburo, Tera- 

machi'dori, Kyoto — 

Art magazine, "Bijutsu Kai." 
Picture book, **Shinbijutsu Kai." 
Collection of design in Tennen 

period. 
Design of Japanese overcoat in 

Tennen period. 
Picture books: 

Hyakutsuru. 

"Chigusa." 

"Kufushu." 

"KWairo." 

"Seikwa." 

A hundred grasses and flow- 
ers. 



Collection of the pictures of 

chrysanthemums. 

"Yohu Gacho." 

"Naminomaki." 

"Urono-megumi." 

"Hogacho." 
Collection of designs. 
Picture books : 

"Dokusho-Kikwan." 

"Chiomi-gusa." 

"Unaino-tomo." 

Collection of the pictures on 
fan. 

Pictures of six sages. 

Collection of designs by Shoun. 
•"Kyosome Nishiki." 

'"Shikino-yosoohi." 

"Shinmoncho." 

''Unkwashu." 

Designs of Kyobi. 

Designs of "orimono." 

Designs of "namimon." 

Collection of shells of Genji. 

Samples of design. 

Collection of pictures by Korin 
school. 

"Seiyei." 

"Fukiyose." 

"Udzuraginu." 

"Nihoi." 

Design of porcelain. 

Design of butterflies. 
. Glory of the nation. 

New design. 

'Oyo-manga." 

'Chigusano-tane." 

Designs of industrial arts. 

*^Kigae." 
Kokkei dzuan." 

'Hobun gacho." 

"Chikudo-Gafu." 

"Seiho-Gafu." 



iti 



Kt 



(f 



If 



JO 



Japanese Exhibition, 



"Kwako-Gafu." 

Selection of thirty artists. 

"Shunkyo-Gafu." 

"Kitano-Yema." 

"Shingayen." 

Fine art and industrial art. 

"Sakigake." 

"Sentetsu-iho." 

"Daraku-dzuye.*' 

Collection of the pictures by 
Shonen. 

Collection of a hundred pic- 
tures by Gochikudo. 

Ancient fine art. 

Scenery of old capital. 

Of mountain Fuji, by Seiho. 

Collection of animals. 

Scenery and products of 
Kyoto. 

Selection of pictures. 
Picture frames with pictures 

printed with wood cut, and 

book. 
Picture frames with the printed 

pictures. 
Wood printing of a group of but- 
terflies. 

9. Yoshikawa Hanshichi, Mina- 
midenma-cho, Kyobashi-ku, 
Tokyo — 
Collection of decorations. 
Diagram illustrating the Imperial 
carriage. 

GROUP 19* 

Instruments of Precision^ Philosoph- 

fcal Apparatus^ etc* — G>ins 

and Medals. 

I. Imperial Mint, Osaka — 

Coins. 
Medals. 



2. Moriya Sadakichi, Toyamn- 
cho, Kanda-ku, Tokyo — 

Steelyards. 
Weights. 

Weighing machine. 
Lever, wooden. 
~ Lever, bone. 

GROUP 2a 

Medicine and Surcenr* 

1. Horiguchi Yakichi, Kitafu- 

t a b a-c h o, H on J o-k u, 
Tokyo — 

Portable dental instruments. 

2. Ito Takufu, Hongo, 5 Chome, 

Tokyo — 

Model of the anatomical dissec- 
tion of human body. 

Model of the skeletcm of human 
body. 

3. M aye da Shinkichi, Higashi- 

misuji-machi, Asakasa-ku, 
Tokyo — 

Operating instrument. 
"Eye" knife. 
Surgical instrument. 
Surgical knife. 

4. Shirai Matsunosuke, Dosha- 

machi, Osaka — 

Bow saw. 

Metacarpal saw. 

Bone forceps. 

Bone shears. 

Rib shears. 

Perforating cranial forceps. 

Bandage shears. 

Artery clamp. 

Artery forceps. 

Sharp curette. 

Needle holder. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



71 



Tongue forceps. 
Kashimura's trocar. 
Bowel clamps. 
Uterus speculum. 
Uterus hook. 
Uterus sharp curette. 
Forceps, double hooked. 
Forceps, single hooked. 
Hypodermic syringe. 
Uterus speculum, bivalve. 
Surgical instrument. 

GROUP 2L 

Musical Instruments* 

I. Nippon Musical Instrument 
Afanufacturing Co., Hama- 
matsu, Shizuoka-Ken — 

Piano and organ. 

GROUP 23. 
Chemical and Pharmatceutical Arts« 

1 . A ndo FukutarOy Kakigarchcho, 

Tokyo — 

Tooth powder. 

2. Baba Jiutaro, Nagoya — 

Evaporating dishes. 

Crucible. 

Mortar. 

Infusion jar. 

Retort. 

Boiling flask. 

Pus basin. 

Porcelain plate for color testing. 

Ointment tile. 

Water reservoir. 

Ointment vessel. 

Ointment jar. 

Bed pan. 

Mortar for cocoon. 

China basin for photographic use. 



Decoction jar. 

Funnel. 

Boat. 

Sterilizer. 

Mercury trough. 

Sulphuric acid desiccator. 

Spoon. 

3. Fukushimaj Benjiro, Osaka — 

Lacquers. 

Samples of lacquers. 

4. Furukawa, Teinosuke, Sone- 

saki, Osaka — 

Fire-work pipes. 
Fireworks. 

5. Hagihara, Tatsuzo, Nishi- 
. shinka-wara-machi, Osaka — 

Toilet soaps. 

6. Harima, Koshichi, Higashi- 

Kazvasaki-cho, Kobe — 

Matches. 

7. Harumoto, Jiusuke, Dosha- 

mnchi, Osaka — 

Toilet soaps. 

8. Hino, Shosaburo, Higashi- 

Shimizu-machi, Osaka — 

Charcoal powders for the use of 

portable stove to warm the 

chest. 
Charcoal powders for the use of 

portable stove to warm limb. 
Portable stove to warm the chest. 
Charcoal powders in bar for the 

use of portable stove to warm 

the chest. 

9. Hirao, Sanpei, Bakuro-cho, 

Nihonbashi-ku, Tokyo — 

Tooth powder. 



72 



Japanese Exhibition, 



10. Inouye, Sadajiro, HondenSan- 

ban-cho, Osaka — 

Toilet soaps. 

11. Kobayashi Soft Medical 

Wafer Manufacturing Co., 
Miye-ken — 

Soft medical wafers. 

12. Kobayashi, Tomijiro, Yanagi- 

waragashi, Kanda-ku, Tok- 
yo — 

Tooth powder. 

13. Kondo, Kichitaro, Yamashita- 

cho, Yokohama — 

Fire-works. 

Animal figured balloon. 

Samples, catalogue, etc. 

14. Nagase, Tomiro, Bakuro-cho, 

Nihonbashi-ku, Tokyo — 

Tooth powder. 
Toilet powder. 
Toilet soaps. 

15. Naoki, Masanosuke, Kusuno- 
ki-cho, Kobe — 

Toilet soaps. 

16. Okada, Keitaro, Ibaraki-ken — 
Illustration of fire-works. 

17. OkamotOj Sensuke, Goko- 

machi'dori, Kyoto — 

Lacquer. 

18. Saito, Kahei, Honmachi, 

Osaka — 
Lacquer. 
Lacquered plates. 

19. Saito, Kichijiro, Yoko-ami- 

cho, Honjo-kti, Tokyo — 

Tooth powder. 



20. Saito, Rihei, Shiwo-machi" 

dori, Osaka — 
Lacquer. 
Lacquered plates. 

21. Shima, Toyosaburo, Dojima- 

ura I-chome, Osaka — 
Medical wafers. 

22. Shimidzu, Tasaburo, Fushimi- 

machi, Osaka — 
Insect powder. 

23. Susuki, Saburosuke, Kanaga- 

wa-ken — 
Potassium iodide. 
Iodoform. 
Refined iodine. 
Raw iodine. 

24. Takatnatsu, Kiushiro,Higashi' 

Hirano-machi, Osaka — 
Glue. 

25. Takigawa, Benzo, Kusunoki- 

cho, Kobe — 
Toilet soaps. 

26. Tanahashi, Tsuji, Minami- 

Ota-machi, Yokohama — 
Fire-works. 

2j. Yasiihara, Yazo, Sonesaki- 
Shine hi, Osaka — 
Fire-works. 

28. Yasuzumi, Isaburo, Hirano- 
machi, Osaka — 
Insect powder. 

GROUP 24. 
Manuf acttsre of Paper* 

I. Chikugo Paper Manufactur- 
ing Association, Fukuoka-- 
ken — 

"Toyo" paper. 

"Chiyo" paper. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



7i 



«1 



'Senzai" paper. 
'Hosho" paper. 
Parasol paper. 
"Kyoka" paper. 

2. Goto, Ukichi, Gifu'ken — 
Copying paper. 

Tissue paper. 

3. Harada Paper Manufacturing 

Co,, Shidzuoka-ken — 
Copying paper. 
Tissue paper. 

4. Hayashi, Kunitaro, Gifu- 

Ken — 
Copying paper. 
Drawing paper. 
Tissue paper. 

5. Hayashi Paper Mill, Kochi- 

Ken— 
Copying paper. 
Tissue paper. 
Letter paper. 
Bookkeeping paper. 
Drawing paper. 

6. Horiki, Chiutaro, Miye-Ken — 
Wall paper. 

7. Imai, Hyoshiro, Gifu-Ken — 
Copying paper. 

Tissue paper. 

8. Imperial Government Paper 

Mill, Tokyo — 

Specimens of the water-marking. 

Bank-note paper with water- 
mark. 

Bond paper with water-mark. 

Map paper used in the Japanese 
Military Department. 

Kyokushi (Japanese vellum). 

Paper for postal stamps used by 
the Japanese Government. 



Printing paper. 

Postal card paper used by the 

Japanese Government. 
Wrapping paper. 

9. Ino Paper Refining Co.,Kochi' 
Ken — 
Hand-made Japanese paper. 
Copying paper. 
Drawing paper. 
"Teison" paper. 
Printing paper. 
Tissue paper. 
Letter paper. 

10. Inui, Kyohachi, Shidsuoka- 

ken — 
Printing and wrapping paper. 
Printing and copying paper. 
Drawing paper. 
Tissue paper. 
Bond paper. 

Paper with transparent design. 
Letter paper and envelopes. 

11. Ishikawa, Daikichi, Yehime- 

ken — 
Copying paper. 
Japanese paper. 

12. Ishizaki, Kiuma, Yehlme- 

Ken — 
Copying paper. 
Tissue paper. 
Japanese paper. 
Japanese vellum paper. 
Tracing paper. 

13. Japan Paper Industry Associa- 

tion — 
Map showing the sources of the 

raw materials of paper. 
Illustration of the process of 

manufacturing the Japanese 

paper. 



74 



Japanese Exhibition^ 



Articles showing the different 
stages of manufacturing pro- 
cess of Japanese paper. 

Samples of paper fabrics and 
papers. 

14. Japan Paper Trading Co., 

HyogO'Ken — 

Copying paper. 
Tissue paper. 
Drawing paper. 
Japanese vellum paper. 
Paper, long sheet. 
"Wato" paper. 

15. Kagi Paper Manufacturing 

Co., Kagi, Formosa — 

Japanese paper. 
Japanese tissue paper. 
Material for manufacturing pa- 
per. 

16. Kano, Yoyemon, Ibaraki- 

Ken — 
"Teison'* paper. 

17. Kawahe, Seishiro, Tomotsu- 

cho, Osaka — 

Paper made of pawllonia im- 
perialia. 

18. Kawamura, Kanyemon, Kochi- 

Ken— 
Copying paper. 

19. Komoda, Ryoichi, Yehime- 

Ken — 
Envelopes. 

20. Komoda, Tokuhei, Yehime- 

Ken — 
Copying paper. 
Tissue paper. 
Printing paper. 
Wrapping paper. 



Japanese paper. 
Letter paper. 
Napkin paper. 

21. Konishi, Yasujiro, Shidsuoka- 

Ken — 
Copying paper. 

22. Kubota, Matsukichi, Kaji-cho, 

Kanda-ku, Tokyo — 

Copying paper. 

23. Maruichi Co., Kochi-Ken — 

Copying paper. 
Tissue paper. 
Printing paper. 

24. Mitsuhashi Asajiro, Junket- 

machi, Osaka — 
Napkin. 

25. Matsui, Sanjiro, Gifu-Ken — 

Copying paper. 
Tissue paper. 

26. Matsuoka, Keigoro, Gifu- 

Ken — 
Copying paper. 
Tissue paper. 

27. Meikosha, Kawara-cho, Asa- 

kusa-kii, Tokyo — 

Paper with transparent design. 

28. Miyc-Ken Cigarette Case 

Manufacturing Association, 
Miye-Ken — 

Imitation leather made of oiled 
paper. 

29. Mukaida Paper Manufacturing 

Co., Tochigi-Ken — 

Napkin paper. 
Tissue paper. 
Copying paper. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



75 



30. Nagano, Genkichi, Kochp- 

Ken — 
Tissue paper. 
Copying paper. 
"Shoyin" paper. 

31. Nakata, Shikaji, Kochi-Ken — 

Copying paper. 
Tissue paper. 

^2, Oishi, Takichi, Miyagi-Ken — 

Paper bags for containing 
cocoons. 

Paper bags for preserving sol- 
diers' cloth. 

33. Ota, Genzayemon, Shidzuoka- 

Ken— 
Hand-made paper. 
Card. 

34. Sanuki Paper Manufacturing 

Association, Kagawa-Ken — 

Napkin paper made of tissue pa- 
per. 

Napkin paper made of straw pa- 
per. 

Copying paper. 

35. Shidsuoka-Ken Paper Indus- 

try Association, Shidzuoka- 

Ken — 
Sized paper. 
Printing paper. 
Wrapping paper. 
Copying paper. 

36. Shimidzu, Ushimatsu, Hyogo- 

Ken — 
Wall paper. 

^y, Shimoyama, Yeikichi, Kuma- 
moto-Ken — 

Copying paper. 



38. Shinowara, Arakichi, Yehime- 

Ken— 
Copying paper. 
Tissue paper. 
Bookkeeping paper. 

39. Shinowara, Sakutaro, Yehime- 

Ken-^ 
Copying paper. 
Tissue paper. 
Japanese vellum paper. 
Letter paper. 
Napkin paper. 

40. Stida & Co., GifU'Ken — 

Drawing paper. 
Copying paper. 
Napkin paper. 

Paper made of pawUonia im- 
perialia. 

41. Takaoka Copying Paper 

Manufacturing Association, 
Kochi-Ken — 

Copying paper. 

42. Takci Paper Trading Co., 

GifU'Ken — 

Copying paper. 
Tissue paper. 
Drawing paper. 
"Chohi" paper. 
"Mitsumata" paper. 

43. Takei Paper Trading Co, — 

Napkin paper. 

Table-cloth paper. 

Doily paper. 

Cake paper. 

Paper made of pawllonia im- 

perialia. 
Paper made of pawllonia im- 

peralia, with design. 



1 



76 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Paper made of pawUonia im- 

perialia and cinder. 
Paper made of "zindai" cinder. 
Paper made of pawllonia im- 

perialia, long rolled. 
Advertisement paper. 

44. Tanabe, Kotaro, Yehiine- 

Ken — 
Copying paper. 

45. Terada, Jisaburo, Tera-tnachi- 

dori, Kioto — 
Tissue paper. 
Writing paper for poetry. 

46. Terao, Saibei, Miye-Ken— 
Napkin paper. 

47. Teshigawara & Co,, Gifu- 

Ken — 
Advertisement paper. 
Design tissue paper. 
Paper napkin. 

Printed paper for window glass. 
Tissue paper doilies. 
Paper doilies. 

48. Tomitagawa & Co., Gifu- 

Ketir-- 
Copying paper. 

49. Tosa Paper Industry Associa- 

tion, Kochi-Ken — 

Cross-beam for the use of manu- 
facturing copying paper. 

Bamboo mat for the use of manu- 
facturing copying paper. 

Notes on the process of manu- 
facturing copying paper. 

Notes on the process of manu- 
facturing tissue paper. 



50. Tosa Tissue Paper Manufac^ 

turing Association, Kochi- 
Ken — 
Tissue paper. 

51. Yamamoto, Seizo, Honsaimo- 

ku'cho, Nihonbashi-ku, To- 
kyo — 
Leather paper. 

52. Yasuda, Toyohachi, Gifu- 

Ken — 
Copying paper. 
Tissue paper. 

53. Yechisen Paper Manufactur- 

ing Association, Fukui- 
Ken— 
"Fosho" paper, broad. 
Private postal cards with trans* 

parent design. 
"Dai Kodan" papers. 
"Teison" paper. 
Copying paper. 
"Koki" paper. 
"Midzutama" paper. 
"Sekka" paper. 
Japanese vellum paper, with 

transparent design. 
Hand-made printing paper. 
Letter paper. 
Envelope. 

54. Yoshino Paper Industry Asso- 

ciation, Nara-Ken — 
Tissue paper. 

GROUP 27* 
Architecttsral Encfincerins:* 

I. Okura, Naojiro, Nara-Ken — 
Model of building. 



1 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. jy 



CHAPTER IV. 
Department of Manufactures. 

Introductory Remarks. 

Previous to the beginning of the new era, the manufacturing in- 
dustries of Japan were carried on by means of manual labor. The 
genius and skill peculiar to the nation suited to produce artistic manu- 
factures of varied natures which had long been esteemed in foreign 
countries. The introduction of Western civilization during the last 
thirty years has been working out a revolution in the method and 
organization of industry. Powerful engines have been substituted for 
manual labor, and the factory industry on a large scale has been dis- 
placing the house industry of the old fashion. The ingenuity and 
adaptability of Japanese people have been adjusted to the new condi- 
tions of manufacturing industry, and many valuable products and in- 
ventions have been made by the application of advanced sciences and 
machineries. Greater degree of industrial skill has been attained, the 
cost of product greatly reduced by the utilization of improved methods, 
and the wider dissemination of technical knowledge has been .co- 
operating to improve the quality of manufactures. A greater per- 
fection of financial system and of legislation relating to industrial ad- 
ministration, and the remarkable increase of capital, have also been 
assisting in the advancement of our industry. The number of fac- 
tories and workshops, which had been 2,984 in 1892, and 4,691 in 
1898, was increased to 7,821 by the year 1902. In 1898, manufacturing 
companies numbered 1,367, with the aggregate capital of 143,617,530 
yen; whereas, in 1902, the number of companies increased to 2,427, and 
the amount of capital to 222,120,193 yen, 

L Metal Works. 

One of the most prominent metal works of Japan is that wrought 
in copper or its alloys. Among the most important localities producing 
copper ware are Kanazawa, Takaoka, Osaka and Kyoto, the products 
of which have been exported to Europe and America in a considerable 
volume. Copper ware inlaid with silver and gold are especially valu- 
able. There are many kinds of alloys formed of a basis of copper with 
varying admixtures of silver and gold and other metals. Especially 
noteworthy among these alloys are bronze, sentoku, shinchu, sawari, 
shakiido, shibiiichi, etc., which are made into various kinds of oma- 



78 Japanese Exhibition, 

ments for alcoves. According to the statistics for 1902, copper works 
produced in various localities were valued as follows : 

Locality. Value. 

Osaka 1,902,265 

Kyoto 690,376 

Takaoka and Toyama 455,033 

Yechigo I4^i79 

Kanazawa 90,700 

Aichi 72,918 

Total 3,487,541 

The manufacture of copper ware is carried on by means of manual 
labor and on a small scale. In 1902, the total number of the manu- 
facturers was 1,945, employing 8,698 men. The following table shows 
the annual output of copper ware for four years : 

Value of 
Year. output. 

1899 • • • i,384»750 

1900 ' 1,106,907 

1901 1,714,419 

1902 3,487,541 

Beside the copper works of the kind above mentioned, Japan has 
developed the art of making many miniature ornaments wrought in 
gold or alloys. This art primarily originated in the making of various 
small ornaments appertaining to the Japanese sword, such as tsuba, or 
guard, and menuki, and various adornments attached to the Japan- 
ese helm. Since the abolition of feudalism, this art has practically 
become obsolete. The time had not been long, however, before it 
took a new form to adapt itself to the needs of modem taste. Many 
cunningly wrought metal ware, engraved, carved, or cast, for various 
purposes of ornament, have become appreciated both at home and 
abroad. The export of gold and silver works of this class increased 
from 60,655 yen in 1900, to 181,340 yen in 1902. 

An alloy, formed of a basis of antimony with admixtures of various 
metals, has been used to manufacture various household utensils and al- 
cove ornaments which have found customers in foreign markets. Small 
ornaments for alcoves, flower vases, small dishes, caskets and toys are 
the principal forms of antimony work. The largest antimony-ware 
producing town is Tokyo, second to which is Osaka. The value of the 
export of antimony works for 1901 and 1902 is 80,769 yen and 
91,110 yen, respectively. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 79 

//. Matting and Rug. 

Matting. — The ordinary plain matting has been manufactured for 
domestic use for many centuries, but the fancy matting is comparatively 
of a recent origin. A considerable improvement was made upon this 
industry in 1876, and in 1881 our matting began to find market in 
foreign countries. At first the province of Okayama was the only 
place where the fancy matting was manufactured. But in recent years 
the same industry has been developed in Hiroshima, Fukuoka, Kagawa 
and Ishikawa. Since 1894, improvement on this manufacture has 
been especially remarkable. More than forty kinds of advanced ma- 
chines for the weaving of mats have been invented, some of which can 
almost rival the cloth-weaving machine in their workmanship and in- 
genuity. Numerous novel designs have been devised, producing mat- 
tings with beautiful figures and of fine quality. The following table 
shows the value of matting produced in five principal localities in 1902 : 

Locality. Value (yen). 

Okayama ., 3,778.068 

Hiroshima 725.625 

Fukuoka 377,15^ 

Kagawa 133,026 

Ishikawa 120,362 

Again, the annual export of mats during the four years following 
1899 is to the following value: 

Year. Value (yen). 

1899 2,460,151 

1900 3>039>79S 

1901 4,960,487 

1902 5,262,097 

Rug. — The Japanese cotton rug was for the first time made about 
the middle of the past century, and has been exported since 1878. 
Rugs made of such material as wool, silk, and flaxen fiber began to- 
be manufactured later. In recent years, the annual export of the cotton 
rug has been to the value of 1,150,000 yen. 

III. Lacquered Ware. 

The lacquered ware has been produced in Japan since the ancient 
period. The art of inlaying in the lacquer ware figures and scenic 
views with gold and silver was invented as early as the Eighth Cen- 
tury. From the Fifteenth Century the takamakiye, a luxurious species 



1 



8o Japanese Exhibition, 

of gold and silver lacquered ware, was produced. Since that time 
various kinds of art lacquered wares have been made, and many new 
designs and styles have been invented. Plain lacquer ware have been 
produced since the middle ages in such localities as Wajima, Yamanaka, 
Aidzu, Takayama, etc. In recent years, Shidzuoka and Kuroye have 
also become important in making lacquer ware. At present, Tokyo, 
Kyoto and Kanazawa are most famous in manufacturing beautiful gold 
and silver lacquer ware. Various new colors of lacquer have been 
added lately, and more complicated and fine figures have been wrought 
upon the ware. 

According to the statistics of 1902, the total output of lacquer ware 
was valued at 5,538,466 yen, of which 889,079 yen was the value of 
export. Its manufacturers numbered 5,266, employing 16,831 men 
and women. The value of the annual output and export of lacquer 
ware is shown in the following table: 

Value of Value of 

Year. output. export. 

1899 5,640,228 988,662 

J900 6,284,318 1,066,390 

1901 5,769,059 994,654 

1902 5,538,466 889,079 

IV. Porcelain and Earthenware, 

Although Japan imported from China the art of porcelain manu- 
facturing, the ingenuity and skill of her people have thoroughly assimi- 
lated this adopted art to her idea and taste, and created in time the 
style and design entirely distinct from those of Chinese porcelain. It 
was in the Thirteenth Century that the Chinese porcelain was imitated 
in Japan. In the Sixteenth Century an improved style of the Chinese 
porcelain was introduced to Japan. In the meantime, a certain num- 
ber of Koreans emigrated to Japan and commenced to produce the 
porcelain after their own method and style. It was about this period 
that the characteristic Japanese porcelain began to be made in such 
localities as Owari, Shigaraki, Karatsu, Mino and Bizen. In the latter 
part of the same century, a number of feudal lords, who took part in 
the expedition to Korea, brought to Japan the Korean porcelain of 
fine quality, which greatly assisted in starting the manufacture of por- 
celain in such localities as Satsuma, Hagi, Takatori, Hirato, etc. In 
the Seventeenth Century, the province of Hizen began to produce 
ptirely white china, and the china known as Arita and Imari, was im- 
proved considerably. In the latter half of the same century many cele- 
brated porcelain artists appeared in Kyoto, whose products were known 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 81 

by the names of Kiyomidzu and Azvata. The Kutani porcelain also 
developed about that time from the Arita porcelain. The Seto, Idzumo 
and Manko porcelains originated in the past century. 

Since the opening of the new era, the Jjapanese earthenware and 
porcelain have undergone considerable improvement. Even Tokyo and 
Yokohama, which did not produce any porcelain worthy of special note, 
can now justly pride themselves on manufacturing valuable kinds of 
porcelain. The reputation of Kyoto, Arita and Sedo as porcelain pro- 
ducing towns is still high, while the Kutani and Satsuma porcelains 
are famous by their fine and skillful workmanship. Considered from 
the volume of the output, the Seto porcelain stands in the first rank and 
is followed by the Mino porcelain. Various valuable improvements 
have been made cm the already famous Shippo cloisonne, which are 
mainly produced in Nagoya, Kyoto and Tokyo. After the Paris Ex- 
position, in 1868, the Shippo has been duly esteemed by European 
people, and in 1901, its export was valued at 250,716 yen. The Japan- 
ese cloisonne has the characteristic entirely distinct from that of 
foreign cloisonne. 

The following table shows the value of the annual product and ex- 
port of our porcelain and earthenware for four years : 

Value of Value of 

Year. output. export. 

1899 5,867,833 2,181,336 

1900 6,873,693 2,471,904 

1901 6,935,176 2,491,668 

1902 6,911,301 2,461,544 

V. Fabrics and Embroidery. 

Cotton Fabrics. — The manufacture of cotton cloth advanced 
rapidly after the importation of the cotton yam and the introduction of 
spinning industry. The prefectures of Aichi, Gifu and Saitama are 
leading cotton cloth manufacturing centers. Wakayama and Kyoto 
produce a considerable amount of cotton flannel of fine quality. The 
manufacture of cotton cloth is carried on, on a small scale, by means of 
manual labor. 

Silk Fabrics. — The art forms of silk tissues can be seen in the 
velvet, crepe and embroidery, all of which are made by hand with fas- 
tidious care and extraordinary dexterity. The designs for embroidery 
and silk tissues are painted by famous artists. Kyoto is identified with 
this art industry. Kiru, Ashikaga and Hachioji are also important 
towns of silk manufacture. The habutai of Fukui, kaiki of Kai, and 



82 Japanese Exhibition, 

the hakata of Chikuzen are kinds of silk tissues especially prized at 
home and abroad. 

Woolen Cloth, — The manufacture of woolen cloth in Japan is of 
recent origin. The muslin, flannel and other woolen cloths, however, 
are now produced in considerable volume. The manufacture of muslin 
has been especially developed. 

Statistics. — According to the statistics of 1902, the total number 
of textile factories stood at 1649, ^^^ ^^^it of weaving shops in private 
houses was 302,267, the aggregate number of working men and women 
being 772,964. The output of textiles in the same year was valued at 
151,187473 yen, of which the export was to the value of 37,013,920 yen. 
Leading fabrics for export at present are the habutai and silk hand- 
kerchief and the cotton crepe and flannel. 

The following table shows the value of the annual output and ex- 
port of textiles for four years: 

Value of Value of Export. 

Year. output. Silk. Cotton. 

« 

1899 I74»997»743 110,893,609 2,597,979 

1900 178,234,498 22,922,207 5,723,669 

1901 153,595,919 29,578,532 5,461,972 

1902 151,187,473 31,032,379 5,981,545 

VL Raw Silk. 

Since the Government established a model silk spinning factory, 
in 1872, this industry has made remarkable progress. Many factories 
have beeii established, year after year, spinning machines and instru- 
ments improved and invented, and the method of sericulture has been 
greatly reformed. The government inaugurated an experimental seri- 
cultural station in Tokyo and silk inspection stations in Yokohama and 
Kobe for the purpose of improving the quality of silk and of preventing 
the export of adulterated silk. At present a silk inspection station is 
found in almost every important silk manufacturing town. 

The following table shows the growth of silk manufacture during 
the four years succeeding 1899: 

Volume of Volume of Value of 

Year. output (kin), export (kin), output (yen). 

1899 10,964,013 5,946,911 62,627,721 

1900 10,973,444 4,630,903 44,657,229 

1901 10,940,169 8,697,706 74,667,331 

1902 11,205,800 8,078,166 76,859,478 



4 

II 



1 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 83 

VIL Cotton Yarns, 

The cotton spinning after the Western method was introduced to 
Japan in 1861, since when numerous spinning factories have been es- 
tablished. The volume of the output of cotton yam has been so swelled 
that at present it forms one of our important exports, beside fulfilling 
domestic demand. Since the abolition of customs duty upon the 
raw cotton, the spinning industry has especially developed. At 
present there are 80 factories with a capital of 34,459,082 yen. The 
total value of the output in 1902 was 38,458,947 yen, of which 19,- 
911,523 yen was the value of* export. 

The following table shows the amount of annual output and ex- 
port of cotton yarn for four years: 

Voliims of out- Volume of ex- Value of ex- 
Ycar. . put (kwan). port (kwan). port (yen). 

1899 43,052,402 102,360,832 28,521,438 

1900 32,419,641 62,6i9»66o 20,589,263 

1901 33*115,829 62,751,795 21,465,572 

1902 38,458,947 59,244,283 19,901,523 

VIII, Strazv and Chip Braids. 

Until recently, the small village of Omori was the only place where 
the straw braid was produced. It was after the opening of the new 
era that Japan improved this industry and commenced to export the 
straw braid to Western countries, where it has been generally appre- 
ciated on account of the beautiful color and fine quality characteristic 
to the Japanese straw. The prefectures of Okayama, Aichi and 
Kagawa are the most important localities of this industry. The annual 
value of output and export of straw braids is as follows: 

Value of Value of 

Year. output. export. 

1900 2,926.127 4,025,159 

1901 2,516,219 2,989,836 

1902 2,377,349 2,938,858 

The chip braid has been recently manufactured from shavings 
of various kinds of wood. Some of fine shavings are made as thin 
and light as paper. The art of putting various artistic figures on 
chip has also been invented. Thus, the chip braid has found con- 
siderable favor in Western countries. The total value of its output 
in 1900 was 25,525 yen; in 1901, 65,451 yen; and in 1902, 378431 yen. 



--I 



84 



Japanese Exhibition, 



IX. Miscellaneous, 

Besides the articles described in the foregoing pages, the following 

articles have also been exported: Shell buttons, leather works, fans, 

umbrellas, brushes, toys, ivory and tortoise-shell works, and bamboo 

works. According to the statistics of 1902, the export of these 

articles was to the following value: 

Yen. 

Umbrella 1,037,926 

Fan 798.156 

Brush 626,328 

Toy 385,760 

Button 371,865 

Knitwork underwear 324,430 

Leather work 314,412 



Exhibits, 



GROUP 28* 

Stationery* 
(Palace of Mantdacturcs.) 

1. Fukita Yosuke, Honkokucho, 

Nihonbashiku, Tokio — 
Drawing brushes. 
Japanese solid ink. 

2. Ida Tokubei, Oimatsucho, 

Osaka — 
Japanese solid ink. 

3. Inoue Kanetaro, Muramat- 

sucho, Nihonbashi'ku, To- 
kio — 
Drawing instruments. 

4. lio Shobei, Nagoya — 
Writing brushes. 
Drawing brushes. 

5. Kamada Ycizo, Bakurocho, 

Osaka — 
Copying books. 
Copying papers. 
Drawing papers. 
Account book papers. 
Papers. 



6. Mayekawa Yohei, 'l eramachi- 

dori, Kioto — 
Pen wipers. 

7. Mizntani Karoku, Nara-ken — 
Writing brushes. 

8. Nakamura Zenyemon, Fuya- 

cho-dori, Kioto — 
Japanese solid ink. 
Drawing brushes. 

9. Oka I h ei, Tamayacho, 

Osaka — 
Pencil sharpeners. 

10. Shibukawa Kikusaburo, Saku- 

macho, Kanda-ku, Tokio — 
Drawing instruments. 

11. Suzuki Tokujiro, Minamikiu- 

hojimachi, Osaka — 
Painting brushes. 

12. Takei Paper Co., Gifu-ken — 
Copying books. 

13. Tsutsuminaka Unosuke, Rok- 

kakudori, Kioto — 
Drawing brushes. 
Large size paint brush. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



85 



GROUP 29. 

Cutlery. 

(Palace of Mantrfactarci.) 

1. Sakai Kaneyoshi, Sakai, 

Osaka-fu — 
Scissors. 
Knives. 

2. Seki Hamonosho Kumiai 

{Seki Cutlery Merchant^ 
Union) y Gifu-ken — 
Daggers. 

3. Senga Tetsukichi, Suyeyoshi- 

bashi-dori, Osaka — 
Scissors. 
Knives. 

4. IVada Sohachi, Junkeimachi, 

Osaka — 
Shears. 

5- Yamanaka & Co., Kitahama, 

Osaka — 
Daggers. 

GROUP 30* 

Gold and Silversmiths^ Work for 

Religious or G>mmon Uses 

in Gold» Silver, Bronze 

or other Metals* 

(Palace of Varied lodtsstries.) 

1. Aoki Yoshikiyo, Honmachi- 

dori, Kioto — 
Table omannent. 

2. Asaoka hvataro, Aokicho, Yo- 

kohama — ^ 

Censers. 
Flower vases. 

3. Fujishima Suyekichi, Take- 

yamachi-dori, Kioto — 
Bird cage. 
Insect cage. 



Whisk broom. 
Soap boxes. 
Fruit basket. 

4. Fiijiwara Ihei, Hachimancho, 

Osaka — 
Mantel ornament. 

5. Handa Chubei, Kawarayacho, 

Osaka — 
Cake plates. 
Bowls. 
Pitchers. 

6. Hasegawa Katsukiyo, Sotote- 

machi, Honjoku, Tokio — 
Mantel ornaments. 
Flower vases. 
Pitcher. 
Dining utensils. 

7. Hashimoto Tokusaburo, Ota- 

machi, Yokohama 
Pin plates. 
Ash receiver. 
Card plates. 
Pen trays. 
Inkstands. 
Toy tea service. 
Tobacco utensils. 
Satchels. 
Incense boxes. 
Match boxes. 
Copy press. 
Flower basins. 
Candlesticks. 
Dust pans. 
Picture frames. 
Stamp boxes. 
Card boxes. 
Censer. 

Tobacco boxes. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Bell. 
Match boxes. 



86 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Paper knives. 
Spoons. 
Hat racks. 
Copy press. 

8. Hirala Shigemitsu, Suyehiro- 

cho, Kandaku, Tokio — 
Sake bowl. 
Flower vases. 
Fruit dish. 
Flower plate. 
Coffee service. 
Ice shake vessels. 
Tobacco boxes. 
Cake bowls. 
Tobacco cases. 
Spoons. 

9. Hori Yonekichi, Suyeyoshi- 

bashi-d ori, Honjok u, 
Tokio — 
Cigar box. 

10. Igarashi Katsujiro, Sotode- 

machi, Tokio — 
Flower vases. 
Incense box. 
Censer. 

Mantel ornaments. 
Cigar boxes. 
Card trays. 

11. Inouye Kashiro, Kayacho, 

Asakusaku, Tokio — 
Soap boxes. 

12. I to Sadabumi, Iriyacho, Shita- 

yaku, Tokio — 
Flower vases. 
Censer. 
Card plate. 

13. hvasaki Go, Okachimachi, 

Shitayaku, Tokio — 
Candlesticks. 
Flower vases. 



Mantel ornaments. 
Ash receivers. 
Plates. 

14. Jomi Yeisuke, Teramachi- 

dori, Kioto — 
Flower vases. 
Censers. 

Tobacco-smoking utensils. 
Lanterns. 
Incense tray. 
Cake bowl. 
Mantel ornament. 
Tobacco cases. 
Coffee service. 
Flower vase. 
Card plates. 
Ash receivers. 
Cabinet. 

Colored metal samples. 
Model of hammering process. 
Model of engraving process and 
tools. 

15. Kagawa Katsuhiro, Sakuragi- 

cho, Shitayaku, Tokio — 
Tobacco box. 

16. Kanaya Gorosaburo, Tomino- 

koji'don, Kioto — 
Censers. 

17. Kashima Yeijiro, Nichomachi, 

Shitayaku, Tokio — 
Censers. 

Ornamental jar. 
Incense box. 

18. Katsura Mitsuharu, Minami- 

ayase, Tokio — 
Flower vase. 

19. Kawaguchi Yohei, Tachibana- 

cho, Tokio — 
Mantel ornament. 
Tablet. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



87 



Censers. 
Flower vases. 
Ornamental jars. 
Shrine. 

20. Kobayashi Kojiro, Sanjikkan- 

bori, Kiobashiku, Tokio — 
Flower vases. 
Mantel ornament. 
Flower plate. 

21. Kobayashi Toru, Kawaracho, 

Asaktisaku, Tokio — 
Pen plates. 
Pen wiper. 
Stamp box. 
Letter holder. 
Paper knives. 
Plates. 
Inkstands. 
Candlesticks. 
Match boxes. 
^ Tobacco-smdcing vessels. 
Ash receivers. 
Dust pans. 
Card plates. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Flower vases. 
Incense boxes. 
Plates. 
Bells. 

Ring hooks. 
Cigar boxes. 
Cane heads. 
Card trays. 
Buttons. 
Picture frames. 

22. Kobayashi, Zembei, Shiwocho, 
Nihonbashiku, Tokio — 
Plates. 

Ash receivers. 
Card trays. 
Plates. 



Trays. 
Pen trays. 
Flower vases. 
Tea jar. 
Tea strainer. 
Photograph frames. 
Picture frames. 
Mirror. 
Flower basin. 
Tobacco box. 
Watch chains. 
Thermometer. 
Paperweight. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Bowls. 
Covered vessels. 

Cake dishes. 

Cake plates. 

Sugar dish. 
Candlesticks. 

Bread plates. 

Card receivers. 

Spoons. 

Salt spoons. 

Cups. 

Pin cushion. 

Napkin rings. 

Match boxes. 

Toothpick boxes. 

Face powder boxes. 

Jewel caskets. 

Ring hooks. 

Brush case. 

Stamp boxes. 

Dust pan. 

Tea service. 

Candlesticks. 

Tobacco-smoking utensils. 

Tobacco boxes. 

Tobacco cases. 

Censers. 

Bells. 



88 



Japanese Exhibition^ 



Incense boxes. 

Inkstands. 

Ash receiver. 

Letter holder. 

Pepper box. 

Salt cellar. 

Knife handles. 

Perfume bottles. 

Door pulls. 

Clasps. 

Stretchers. 

Soap box. 

Cigar box. 

Wool box. 

Dining utensils. 

Kettles^ 

Stick heads. 

Sticks. 

Umbrella handles. 

Button boxes. 

Finger bowls. 

Hat rack. 

Utensil hooks. 

Shoe horns. 

Shoe hooks. 

Glove hooks. 

Paper knives. 

Blotters. 

Tooth brushes. 

Alcohol lamp. 

Satchels. 

Bowl boxes. 

Purses. 

Plate. 

Censer. 

Sticks. 

Compass. 

Photograph frames 

Die box. 

Charms. 

Medals. 

Watch chains. 



Neck ornaments. 

"Netsuke." 

Rings. 

Cuff buttons. 

Breast pins. 

Pins. 

Knives. 

Bonnet pins. 

Bracelets. 

Buckles. 

Lady's coat buttons. 

Tobacco boxes. 

Cigar boxes. 

Match boxes. 

Spoons. 

23. Komai Otojiro, Furumonsen- 

dori, Kioto — 

Carved figure. 
Cigarette case. 
Watch box. 
Umbrella handle. 
Flower vase. 
Bureau. 
Small box. 
Buckles. 
Cuff buttons. 
Necktie pins. 
Card case. 
Mantel ornament. 
Lady's card case. 

24. Koyama Tnkejiro, Teramachi- 

dori, Kioto — 

Flower vases. 
Cigar boxes. 
Cigar cases. 

25. Kubota Gorobei, Itachibori- 

Minamidori, Osaka — 

Buttons. 






International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



89 



26. Kutnagai Uhachi, Yagenbori- 

cho, Nihonbashi-ku, Tokio — 

Chains. 

Bag particles. 

"Netsuke." 

27. Kurokawa Hidekaisu, Goken- 

cho, Kanda-ku, Tokio — 

Coffee services. 

Tea ser\'ices. 

Kettle and alcohol lamp. 

"Sake'' bottles. 

Dining utensils. 

Pepper boxes. 

Salt cellars. 

Spoons. 

Bowls. 

Tea spoons. 

Cake dishes. 

Toilet articles. 

Tobacco boxes. 

Cigar cases. 

Match boxes. 

Ash receivers. 

Glove clasps. 

Umbrella handles. 

Buckles. 

Flower vases. 

Censer. 

28. Kusakari Toyotaro, Honkoku- 

cho, Nihonbash-ku, Tokio — 

Mantel ornaments. 

Flower vases. 

Bells. 

Candlesticks. 

Censers. 

Flower basins. 

Jars. 

Hat racks. 

Inkstands. 

Brush trays. 



Paper weight. 
Match boxes. 
Tobacco boxes. 
Ash receivers. 

29. Mikawa Kozaburo, Hatago- 

cho, Kanda-ku, Tokio — 
Flower vases. 
Flower basins. 
Candlesticks. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Paper weight. 
Pen trays. 
Incense boxes. 
Ash receivers. 
Match boxes. 
Bells. 
Bowls. 
Satchel. 
Nursing bottle. 
Hat racks. 
Ceilser. 
"Sake" vessel. 
Soap box. 
Cigar cases. 
Picture frames. 
Hat pins. 
Buttons. 
Pins. 

Card trays. 
Napkin rings. 
Spoons. 
Salt cellars. 
Pepper boxes. 
Cane heads. 
Stamp boxes. 
Perfume bottles. 

30. Miyabayashi Sozo, Kurunta- 

zaka-machi, Osaka — 

Nickel plates. 
Nickel soap boxes. 



90 



Japanese Exhibition, 



31. Miyabe Atsuyoshi, Takakura- 

dori, Kioto — 
Bureau. 
Cake chest. 
Flower vases. 
Incense boxes. 

32. Miyamoto Katsu, Yazaemon- 

cho, Kiobachi, Tokio — 
Bowls. 
Tea services. 
Flower vases. 
Incense boxes. 
Face powder boxes. 
Buckles. 

Umbrella handles. 
Cigar boxes. 



Manzaburo, 
Nihonbashi- 



33. Muramatsu 

Odemmacho, 

ku, Tokio — 
Watch chains. 
Rings. 
Pencils. 
Rackets. 
Buttons. 
Pins. 

Brooches. 
Watch cases. 

34. Murata Kimbei, Kawasekoku- 

cho, Nihonbashi'kUj Tokio — 
Flower vases. 
Censers. 
Card tray. 

35. Namekawa Sadakatsu, Sen- 

da gi-cho, HongO'ku, Tokio — 
Mantel ornament. 
Card plate. 
Flower vases. 

36. mac hi Yeijiro, Ogibashi- 

cho, Fukagawa-ku, Tokio — 
Flower dish. 



37. Oseki Teijiro, Honcho, Yoko- 

hama — 
Mantel ornament. 
Tea service. 

38. Saito Masakichi, Ginsa, Kio- 

bashi'kti, Tokio — 
Censer. 
Flower vase. 
Mantel ornaments. 

39. Sana Kashichi, Shinyemon- 

cho, Nihonbashi-ku, Tokio — 
Flower vases. 

40. Sasaki Minekichi, Okayama- 
, ken — 

Card tray. 

41. Shimoseki Kahei, Kaya-cho, 

Asakusa-ku, Tokio — 
Flbwer vases. 
Incense boxes. 
Bowls. 

42. Shin jo Inokichi, Shinzaimoku- 

cho, Nihonbashi-ku, Tokio — 
Cup. 

Tobacco boxes. 
Flower vases. 

43. Shinohara, Jushiro, Honshiro- 

kanecho, Nihonbashi-ku, To- 
kio — 

Inkstands. 

Paper weights. 

Cake plates. 

Smoking plates. 

Plates. 

Mantel ornaments. 

Hat racks. 

Compass. 

Drawer pulls. 

Bowls. 

Tea spoons. 

Tea services. 

Tea jars. 



International Exposition, St. Louis^ 1904. 



91 



44. Suzuki Chokichi, Akashi-cho, 

Kiobashi'ku, Tokio — 
Mantel ornaments. 
Flower vases. 

45. Suzuki Kichigoro, Yokoyama- 

cho, Nihonbashi-ku, Tokior— 
Flower vases. 
Censers. 
Card plates. 
Boxes. 

Match boxes. 
Paper weights. 
Pen plates. 
Ehist pans. 

46. Tajima Trading Co., Gifu- 

ken — 
Pin plates. 
Pen trays. 
Match boxes. 
Trays. 

Paper knives. 
Dust pans. 
Pitchers. 

47. Takata Seijiro, Mukoyanagi- 

tvara, Asakusa-ku, Tokio — 
Mantel ornaments. 
Candlesticks. 
Hat racks. 
Inkstands. 

Utensil in Buddhist worship. 
Incense boxes. 
Stamp boxes. 
Paper weights. 
Pen stands. 
Pen wipers. 
Ash receivers. 
Plates. 
Dust pans. 
Spoons. 
Match boxes. 
Picture frame. 



48. Tamahashi Nisuke, Niigata- 

ken — 
Censer. 
Pitcher. 

49. Tamino Teruchika, Toyama- 

ken — 
Small box.. 

50. Taniguchi Terujiro, Ayano- 

kojidori, Kioto — 
Shrine. 
Jewel casket. 
Tobacco case. 

51. Tsukata Shukio, Yushima- 

Tenjin-cho, Hongo-ku, To- 
kio — 
Flower vases. 

52. Uyeda Chobei, Fuya-cho, Ki- 

oto — 
Flower vase. 
Tobacco cases. 
Tobacco boxes. 

■ 

53. Watanabe Chozo, Aioi-cho, 

Yokohama — 
Mantel ornament. 

54. Yamaguchi Tankin Co., Hira- 

nomachi, Osaka — 
Plates. 
Pitcher. 
Flower vases. 
Censer. 
Incense box. 
Photograph frame. 

56. Yamanaka & Co., Kitahama, 
Osaka — 
Censer. 

Mantel ornaments. 
Daggers. 
Jewel stand. 
Bowls. 
Punch bowl. 



92 



Japanese Exhibition, 



57. Yamasaki Kamekichi, Bakuro- 

cho, Nihonbashi-ku, Tokio — 

Watch chains. 

Compass. 

Spectacle frames. 

Pencil sharpeners. 

Buttons. 

Incense box. 

Censer. 

Tobacco box. 

Rackets. 

Watch ornaments. 

58. Yendo Tomojiro, Yokoyama- 

cho, Nihonbashi'ku, Tokio — 
Plates. 
Bowls. 
Card plates. 
Ash receivers. 
Plates. 
Pen plates. 
Coflfee services. 
Tobacco set. 
Dust pans. 
Face powder boxes. 
Box. 

Tobacco boxes. 
Needle boxes. 
Ring box. 
Candlesticks. 
Inkstands. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Paper weights. 
Photograph frames. 
Cake dish. 
Hat rack. 
Bell. 

Match box. 
Bowls. 
Egg cup. 
Censer. 
Flower vases. 



Lamp stand. 
Clock stand. 
Ornament plate. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Picture frame. 

59. Yuasa Toshichika, Ktize- 
mura, Kioto — 
Flower vases. 
Censers. 
Card tray. 
Tobacco box. 



Works. 

1. Adachi Kinjiro, Nagoya- 
Censer. 

Vases. 

Lamp stands. 
Cake dish. 
Box. 

Napkin ring. 
Buckles. 

2. Ando Jubei, Nagoya — 

Screens. 
Vases. 
Boxes. 

Tobacco boxes. 
Ash receiver. 
Censer. 
Trays. 
Tablets. 
Flower pots. 
Flower plates. 
Flower basin. 
Cake dish. 
Mantel ornament. 
Censer. 

3. Gonta Hirosuke, Nagoy 

Flower vases. 
Trav. 






International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



93 



4. Goto ChiyonOj 
Yokohama — 
Flower vases. 



Uchida-cho, 



,5. Goto Fusataro, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 
Censers. 
Buckle and pot. 

<6. Goto GenjirOj Aichiken — 
Flower vases. 

7. Hattori, Kichibei, Aichiken — 
Flower vases. 

Flower basin. 

8. Hattori Kiosaburo, Aichi- 

ken — 
Flower basin. 
Chest. 

•9. Hattori Tadasaburo, Na- 
goya— 
Chest. 
Censers. 
Card tray. 
Incense box. 
Lamp stand. 
Buckle. 

:io. Hattori Umetaro, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 

II. Hayakawa Kamejiro, Na- 
goya— 
Flower vases. 
Tobacco boxes. 
Ash receivers. 
Match box. 

J 2. Hayashi Hachijsaemon, Na- 
goya— 
Flower vases. 
Box. 
Censers. 
Bowl. 
Hand box. 



Cup. 

Incense box. 
Card plate. 

13. Hayashi Tazaemon, Aichi- 

ken — 
Flower vases. 
Mantel ornament. 

14. Hayashi Yasujiro, Aichi- 

ken — 
Flower vases. 
Plate. 

15. Hayashi Chuzo {Representa- 

tive of Hayashi Co.), Aichi- 
ken — 
Flower vases. 

16. Hayashi Daisaku {Represent- 

ative of Tairin kwan kio- 
meikwai), Aichi-ken — 

Flower vases. 

Flower bowls. 

Umbrella handles. 

Card cases. 

Buckles. 

17. Hayashi Kodenji, Aichi-ken — 
Flower vases. 

Hand boxes. 

18. Hayashi Kuwajiro, Aichi- 

ken — 
Flower vases. 

19. Hayashi Seigoro, Aichi-ken — 
Flower vases. 

20. Hirano Kichibei, Teramachi- 

dori, Kioto — 
Flower vases. 

21. Honda Yosaburo, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 

Censers. 

Pot. 

Covered vessels. 



94 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Boxes. 

Tray. 

Mantel ornaments. 

Plate. 

22. Ichiban Company, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 

Censers. 

Cake vessel. 

Hand box. 

Pot. 

Tray. 

Ash receiver. 

Coffee service. 

23. Ichikawa Tsunezo, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 

Censers. 

24. Ikai Sanjiro, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 

25. Ikeo Kimbei, Aichi-ken — 
Flower vases. 

Cake plate. 

26. Inaba Nanaho, Imakojimachi, 

Kioto — 
Plates. 

Flower vases. 
Flower pots. 
Tobacco box. 
Tea service. 
Kettles. 
"Sake" pots. 

2y, Isshiki Shuriki, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 
Censers. 
Pen stand. 
Tea service. 

28. Kaivade Shibataro, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 
F'lower plates. 
Tablets for ornament. 



29. Kawaguchi Bunsemon, Na- 

goya— 
Flower vases. 
Covered vessel. 
Pot. 
Bowl. 
Tray. 
Censers. 
Buttons. 
Incense box. 
Card tray. 

30. Kazvano Yoshitaro, Honcho, 

Yokohama — 
Flower vases. 
Bowl. 
Pot. 

Coffee service. 
Cake vessel. 
Toilet set. 

31. Kodama Seisaburo, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 

Censers. 
Incense box. 
Card tray. 
Ash receiver. 
Fire box. 

32. Komabayashi Suekichi, Na- 

goya— 
Flower vases. 
Incense box. 
Censers. 

33. Kumeno Teitaro, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 

Pot. 

Censers. 

Bowls. 

Coffee service. 

Card plate. 

Salt cellars, with spoons. 

Pepper boxes. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



95 



Match boxes. 
Hand boxes. 
Buckles. 

34. Kuno Heisuke, Aichi-ken — 
Flower vases. 

Incense box. 

35. Kyoshinsha, Furukawamachi, 

Kioto — 
Tea service. 
Censers. 
Flower vases. 
Tea pots. 
Card plates. 
Ash receivers. 
Napkin rings. 
Flower pots. 
Bowls. 

Coffee service. 
Buckles. 
Tobacco sets. 
Inkstands. 
Covered vessels. 
Chocolate service. 
Box. 

36. Mizogiichi Tn}\, Aichi-ken — 
Flower vases. 

Bowl. 
Bowl. 

37. Mizuno Ihei, Nagoya — 
Censers. 

Flower vases. 

38. Mizutani Tetsuzo, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 

Mantel ornament. 

39. Momoi Tatsuo, Motohama- 

cho, Yokohama — 
Flower vase. 

40. Mori Tatsujiro, Nagoya — 
Flower vase. 

Incense box. 
Cup. 



41. Murase Jinsaburo, Aichi- 

ken — 
Flower vases. 
Censers. 
Plate. 
BowL 

42. Nagata Sojiuro, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 

Censers. 

43. Nakamura Tsurukichi, Na- 

goya— 
Flower vases. 
Incense box. 
Censer. 

44. Namikoshi Kyomei, Shippo- 

kwai, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 
Fire boxes. 
Censer. 
Plate. 
Bowl. 

45. Namikawa Sosuke, Shinye- 

mon-cho, Nihonbashi-ku, To- 

i 

kio — 
Tablets. 
Flower vases. 
Flower bowl. 
Censer. 
Trays. 
Card trays. 
Boxes. 
Incense boxes. 

46. Noma Kitaji, 1 

Kume NobutsunaA ^^^^oya— 

Flower vases. 
Buckle. 
Incense box. 
Bowls. 
Censer. 
Cuff buttons. 



96 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Card plate. 
Cake vessels. 
Flower vases. 

47. Nonogaki Naoj'iro, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 
Flower pots. 
Bowls. 
Vases. 

49. Ohashi Tsunesaburo, Na- 

goya— 
Flower vases. 
Bowl. 

50. Okamoto Shosaburo, Aichi- 

ken — 
Flower vases. 
Buckles. 
Cuff buttons. 
Studs. 

Incense boxes. 
Censer. 

51. Ota, Jiunai, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 

Mantel ornaments. 
Censers. 
Hand box. 
Tobacco box. 
Tooth brush holder. 
Buckles. 

52. Ota Katsusaburo (representa- 

tive of Honyeisha), Aichir 

ken — 
Flower vases. 
Censers. 
Plates. 

53. Ota Harujiro, Aichi-ken — 
Flower vases. 

Canes. 
Card plate. 
Pots. 
Censer. 
Bowl. 



54. Ota Hyozo, Aichi-ken — 
Flower vases. 

55. Ota Tamejiro, Aichi-ken — 

Flower vases. 
Censer. . 

56. Ota Tomoemon, Nagoya — 

Flower vases. 
Censer. 
Cake vessel. 
"Sake" pot. 
Hand box. 
Specimens. 
Buckles. 
Tea jar. 
Toilet set. 

57. Ota Toshiro, Aichiken — 

Flower vases. 
Plates. 
Incense box. 
Card plates. 
Umbrella handles. 
Censers. 

58. Sano Bunjiro, Nagoya — 

Flower vases. 
Incense box. 
Covered vessels. 

59. Sano, Toyosaburo, Sanjo, 

Kioto — 

Flower vases. 
Buckles. 

60. Sato, Nasuyemon, Nishi-Tobe^ 

cho, Yokohama — 
Censers. 
Flower vases. 
Round trays. 
Square tray. 
Box. 
Bowls. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



97 



61. Sato, Sentaro, Saki-cho, Yoko- 

Flower vases. 
Censers. 
Incense boxes. 
Tray. 

62. Shibayama, Ichisaburo, Va- 

goya— 
Flower vases. 
Incense boxes. 

63. Shimamnray Shingo, Tera- 

machi-dori, Kioto — 
Biscuit box. 
Smoking sets. 
Photograph frames. 
Flower pots. . 
Pitchers. 
Sake pot. 
Flower vases. 
Censers. 

a 

64. Shimizu, Shige, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 

Cake vessels. 

65. Sliippokiimi Kwaisha, Aichi- 

kcn — 
Flower vases. 

66. Suzuki, Varoku, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 

Boxes. 
Censers. 
Bowl. 

Napkin ring. 
Buckles. 
Bowls. 

Stamp boxes. 
Incense boxes. 
Plates. 

67. Suzuki, Toramatsu, Nagoya — 
Flower plates. 



67. Suzuki, Kicliigoro, Yokoya- 

macho, Nihonbashi-ku, To- 

kio — 
Flower vases. 
Card plates. 
Censers. 
Tablets. 

68. Takahara, Komajiro, San jo- 

bash ih igash i, K io to — * 
Flower vases. 
Jars. 

Sake pot. 
Buckles. 

69. Takasaki, Takaichiro, Ishiha- 

ramachi, Honjo-ku, Tokio — 
Censer. 

Flower vases and mantel orna- 
ment. 

70. Takaya Bros. Co,, San jo -d or i, 

Kioto — 
Flower vases. 
Jewel casket. 
Nursing vessels. 
Censers. 
Pitchers. 
Box. 
Tea pot. 

71. Takeda, Chiuemon, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 

72. Takeda, Genjiro, Aichikcu — 
Flower vases. 

73. Takeda, Saijiro, representative 

of Hosansha, Aichiken — 
Flower vases. 
Cake dishes. 
Balls. 
Bottle. 
Plate. 
Incense box. 



98 



Japanese Exhibition, 



74. Takeda, Saijiro, Aichiken — 
Flower vases. 

75. Takeda, Seikuro, Aichiken — 
Flower vases. 

Ash receiver. 

76. Takeda, Tsunesuke, Aichi- 

ken — 
Flower vases. 

yj, Takito Company, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 

78. Taniguchi, Tokujiro, Musha- 

nokoji, Kioto — 
Flower vases. 
Covered vessels. 
Tobacco box. 
Hand box. 
Incense box. 
Jewel chests. 
Swords. 

79. Terazawa, Ycijiro, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 

80. Tomiki, Shobei, Nagoya — 

Flower vases. 
Cigar box. 
Book shelf. 
Flower plate. 
Pot. 

Hand box. 
Censers. 

81. Tsiikamoto, Jimbci, Nagoya — 

Censers. 
Flower vases. 
Bowl. 

82. Tsttkamoto, Hikokichi, Aichi- 

ken — 
I^^lower vases. 
Incense box. 



83. Tsukamoto, 
ken — 
Flower vases. 
Incense box. 



Tojiro, Aichi- 



84. Tsukamoto, Takisaburo, Na- 



goy 



Flower vases. 

85. Yamada, Kanjiro, Aichiken — 
Flower vases. 

Censer. 
Bowl. 

86. Yamamoto, Yusan, Sanjo- 

Af inami-ura, Kioto — 
Chest. 

Flower vases. 
Buckles. 

87. Yasukawa, Hyoji, Shimizu- 

cho, Yokohatna — 
Flower vases. 
Flower plates. 

89. Yoshida, Shaki, Aichiken — 
Flower vases. 

GROUP 31- 

Jewelry* 
(Palace of Varied Indiittries.) 

1. Ishihara, Sohei, Kofu — 
Mantel ornaments. 
Flower Vases. 

2. Kazi^ashima, Katsuzo; Koma 

Isaburo; Nagaoka, Moichi- 

ro, Shimane-ken — 
Censers. 

Desk ornaments. 
Amethyst. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Agnate beads. 
I'^Iower vase. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



99 



3. Kobayashi, Sakuzaemon, Rep- 

resentative of Jitsugio Dan- 

tai, Fukui'ken — 
Colored agate balls. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Agate balls. 
Paper weights. 
Basin ornaments. 

4. Kurokane, Denshichi, Ibaraki- 

ken — 
Pins. 
Pin ornaments. 

5. Mikimoto, Kokichi, Miye- 

ken — 
Pearls (cultured). 
Samples of pearls. 
Photographs. 
Glass beads. 
Pearl rings. 
Pearl pins. 
Pearl studs. 
Pearl cuff buttons. 
Ear-rings. 
Brooches. 
Bracelets. 
Necklaces. 

6. Numata, Sangoro, Miyeken — 
Pins. 

Rings. 

7. Oishij Kaoru, Yamanashi- 

ken — 
Alantel ornaments. 
Quartz. 

8. Tanaka, Akihiro, Yamanashi- 

ken — 
Mantel ornaments. 

9. Tanaka, Scijiro, Yamanashi- 

ken — 
Manter ornaments. 



10. Tanzawa, Kihachiro; Yama- 
nashiken — 

Mantel ornaments. 



1 1 . Tsu chiya, A iso, 
ken — 
Mantel ornaments. 



Yamanashi- 



12. TsHchiya, Muneyuki, Yama- 

nashi'ken — 

Mantel ornaments. 

Mantel ornament stands. ' 

13. Yamanaka & Co., Osaka — 
Agate flower vase. 

Agate wine cups and mantel or- 
naments. 

14. Yoda, Kesaso, Kamiyoshicho, 

Asakusa-kn, Tokio — 
Amethyst. 
Opal balls. 

GROUP 32* 

Qock and Watch Mokin^. 
(Palace of Maiittfachim.) 

I. Takada, Saijiro, Mukoyana- 
gizvaramachi, Asakusa-ku, 
Tokio — 

Clock cases. 

Cloclc. 

Clock case ornaments. 

Ornamental hinges. 

GROUP 33. 

Prodtsctions in Marble» Bronzct Cast 
Iron and Wrousfht Iron* 

(Palace of Varied Industries*) 

I. Abe, Jtisai, Hanasonocho, 
Shitayaku, Tokio — 

^lantel ornaments. 



lOO 



Japanese Exhibition, 



2. ^Irai, Vastijiro, Kasaya-machi, 

Osaka — 
Mantel ornaments. 
Bowls. 

Flower vases. 
Lanterns. 

3. Fujiwara, Ihei, Yawata-machi, 

Osaka — 
Lanterns. 
Mantel ornaments. 

4. Fujikaiva, Teishi, Niigata- 

ken — 
Card trays. 

5. Fukiida Bros., Kita-Kintaro- 

mac hi, Osaka — 
Mantel ornaments. 
Lanterns. 
Flower pots. 
Flower vases. 
Fountain. 

6. Fukiida, Kojiro, Sliigaken — 
Flower vase. 

7. Hasegazi'a, Kamcycmon, Wa- 

kamiya-dori, Kioto — 
Flower vase. 
Candlesticks. 
Bread vessels. 

8. Hascgaiva, Kojiro, Uye-Hon- 

mac hi, Osaka — 
Mantel ornaments. 

9. Hayashi, Shinsiikc, Fiirumon- 

::cn, Kioto — 
Mantel ornaments. 
Censer. 
Lanterns. 

10. Hirano Kichihei, Tcramcchi- 
dori, Kioto — 
Flower vases. 
Lanterns. 



11. Hod Ota, Takichi, Sakaicho, 

Yokohama — 
Flower vases. 
Censers. 

12. Hori, Sangoro, Niigataken — 
Mantel ornaments. 

Flower vases. 

13. Ichihashi, Torakichi, Higashi- 

Hirano-machi, Osaka — 

Electric lamp stand. 
Flower vases. 

14. Idzmni, Scijo, Yamamoto-cho, 

Kanda-ku, Tokio — 
Censer. 
Flower vases. 

15. Ikcda, Seisuke, Kioto — 

Alantel ornament. 
Flower vases. 
Censer. 

16. Imai, IVasaburo, Kioto — 
r^lower vases. 

17. Inui, Tcisaburo, Shinmonzcn, 

Kioto — 
Tablet. 
Censers. 
Flower vases. 
Bowls. 

18. Ishii, Kihei, Sukiya-cho, Ni- 

honbashi-kn, Tokio — 

]\Iantel ornaments. 

19. Kadoha, Kanzayejuon, Bentcn- 

dori, Yokohama — 

]\Iantel ornaments. 
Flower vase. 

20. Kamiya, Teijiro, Ibarakikcn — 
Flower vases. 



International Exposition. St. Louis, 1904. 



lOI 



21. Kanaya, Gorosaburo, Tomino- 

koji, Kioto — 
Ornamental jar. 
Flower vases. 
Tray. 
Box. 
Tablet. 

22. Kanazaiva, Gcnsnke, Ibaraki- 

ken — 
Flower vases. 

23. Kaneda, Kancjiro, Oga-clio, 

Kvobashi'ku, Tokio — 

Mantet ornaments. 

24. KanOy Seiun, M 11 koji ma Uke- 

ji-cho, Honjo-kit, Tokio — 

Flower vases. 
Mantel ornament. 

25. Katori, Hidemasa, Xippori, 

Tokio — 
Fountain. 

26. Kawakami. Katsiitoslii, Sen- 

dagi-cho, Hongo-ku, Tokio — 
Censer. 
Mantel ornament. 

27. KiharOy Hoshu, Tokio — 

Flower vases. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Candlesticks. 

2S. Kitamura, Kihci, Tamaya- 
nwchi, Osaka — 

Flower vases. 
Fire boxes. 

29. Kobayashi, Kojiro, Sanjikkcn- 
bori, Kyobashi-ku, Tokio — 

Flower vases. 
Mantel ornament. 



30. Koidzumi, Gcnsaburo, Ibara- 

ki-ken — 
Iron kettle. 
Bell. 

31. Kumckaxva, Ycikichi Sanno- 

miya, Kobe — 
Flower vase. 
Mantel ornaments. 

32. Kuritani, Gcnrokn, Tori-Abu- 

ra-cho, Nihonbashi-ku, To- 
kio — 
Flower vases. 

33. Kuroda, KiicJii, Teramachi, 

Kioto — 
Smoking set. 
Flower vases. 
Plate. 
Tobacco box. 

34. Kuroha, Gcmbci, Ibataki- 

ken — 
Tablet. 

Flower vases. 
Incense box. 

35. Kurokazi'a, Hidekatsti, Gokcn- 

cho, Kanda-ku, Tokio — 
Flower vases. 
Cake bowl. 
Match boxes. 
Cigarette boxes. 

36. ^[aki Mitsuhiro, Kojima-cho, 

Asakusa-ku, Tokio — 
Mantel ornaments. 
Censers. 
Flower vases. 

37. Makino, Sotojiro, Xezii-Miya- 

naga-cho, Ilongo-kti, To- 
kio — 
Mantel ornaments. 



I02 



Japanese Exhibition, 



38. Metal Work Association for 

St. Louis Exposition — 
Flower vases. 
Mantel ornaments. ' 
Plates. 
Censers. 
Tablet. 
Card plates. 
Cigarette boxes. 
Flower pot. 
Candlesticks. 
Beer cups. 
Paper weights. 
Ofnamental plate. 
Match boxes. 
Cigar holders. 
Tea service. 

39. Mintino, Kashichi, Yazvata- 

suji, Osaka — 
Flower vases. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Censer. 

40. Miyamoto, Yunan, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 

Mantel ornaments. 

41. Mizoguchi, Yasunosuke, Tom- 

inokoji, Kioto—*- 
Bread plate. 
Flower vases. 

42. Micutani, Tatsuso, Motohama- 

cho, Nagoya — 
Flower basins. 
Censer. 
Bowls. 
Lanterns. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Censer. 

43. Morita, Soju, Ibarakiken — 
Mantel ornament. 



44. Murakami, Hikoshiro, Omiya- 

dori, Kioto — 

Lamp stands. 
Flower basins. 
Mantel ornament. 
Lamp shades. 
Lanterns. 

45. Murakami, Chubei, Kuromon- 

dori, Kioto — 

Lamp stand and flower vases. 
Mantel ornament. 

46. Murakami, Takejiro,. San jo- 

dori, Kioto — 

Ash receivers. 

Trays. 

Pitchers. 

Hanging flower vase. ^ 

Chandeliers. 

Bowls. 

« 

Gongs. 
Lanterns. 
Umbrella stands. 
Flower vases. 
Lamp shades. 
Electric lamp stands. 
Flower pots. 
Smoking sets. 

47. Nagamatsu, Sajiro, Terama- 

chi'dori, Kioto — 
Bells. 
Lanterns. 
Flower vases. 
Card plates. 

48. Nagasaka, Tasaburo, Manjuji- 

dori, Kioto — 

Flower vases. 
Lanterns. 
Mantel ornament. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



103 



49. Nakantura, Hatnbei, Minami- 

Kinhoji-machi, Osaka — 
Flower yases. 
Coffee service. 
Coffee cups. 
Covered vessel. 
Cake vessels. 
Cigar boxes. 
Bowl. 

50. Nakantura, Sakujiro, Izumi- 

chOy Kyobashi'ku, Tokio — 
Mantel ornament. 

51. Nakantura, Kinosuke, Owari- 

cho, Kyobashi'ku, Tokio — 
Mantel ornament. - 
Flower vases. 
Basin. 

52. Nakano, Sakujiro, Higashi- 

Hiranomachi, Osaka — 
Flower vases. 
Electric lamp stands. 

53. Nishii, Yohei, Kuromonsen, 

Kioto — 
Gas lamp. 
Flower vases. 
Censers. 
Flower pots. 

54. Nishikawa, Ginso, Honcho, 

Yokohama — 
Flower basins. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Candlesticks. 
Censer. 

55. Nishimura, Yasubei, Honma- 

chi, Kioto — 
Flower vases. 
Censer. 
Cake vessel. 
Lunch set. 



Coffee sets. 
Silver pot. 
Smoking set. 

56. Noboriyama, Kinzo, Masago- 

cho, Yokohama — 
Flower vases. 

57. Nogami, Ryoki, Hanazono- 

cho, Shitaya-ku, Tokio — 
Mantel ornaments. 
Censers. 
Flower vases. 

58. Nokawa, Noboru, Shijo-dori, 

Kioto — 
Plates. 

Flower vases. 
Kettle. 

Tobacco box. 
Box. 
Censers. 

59. Nomura, Yozo, Honcho, Yo- 

kohama — 
Flower basin. 

60. Oka, Iheye, Tamaya-machi, 

Osaka — 
Flower basin. 
Smoking set. 
Flower pot boxes. 

61. Okatani, Sosuke, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 

Basin. 
Fire boxes. 

62. Okazaki, Sessei, Yanaka-Hat- 

sune-cho, Shitaya-ku, To- 
kio — 

Flower vases. 

Mantel ornament. 

63. Omori, Katsuhide, Ibaraki- 

ken — 
Mantel ornament. 



I04 



Japanese Exhibition, 



64. Osaka Bronze Co., Kita-Kin- 

hoji-machi, Osaka — 
Lanterns. 
Umbrella stands. 
Flower vases. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Flower pots. 
Tablet. 

65. Ofsttka, Masuzo, Tcramachi- 

dori, Kioto — 
Flower basins. 
Lamp stands. 
Rowls. 
Basin. 
Censer. 

Gas lamp stand. 
Flower pots. 

66. Sekiguchi, Torakiclii, Xiiga- 

' ta— 
Cake vessels. 
Flower vases. 
Pipe holder. 

67. Shibata, Matakichi, Hinode- 

cho, Yokohama — 
Cake bow^ls. 
Card case. 
Flower vases. 
Mantel ornament. 

68. Shimamura, Shin go, Tcrania- 

chi-dori, Kioto — 
Flower basins. 
Censers. 
Flower pots. 
Pitcher. 
Lantern. 

69. Shima, Sahei, Aiivza-Shimo- 

dori, Osaka — 
Flower vases. 
Censers. 
Gas lamp stands. 



Flower pot stands. 

Flower pots. 

Tablet. 

Lanterns. 

Basins. 

Mantel ornaments. 

Fountain. 

Lamp stands. 

Electric lamp stands. 

Umbrella stands. 

70. Shimoseki, Kahci, Kaya-cho, 

Asakusa-ku, Tokio — 

Flower vases. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Flower pots. 
Plates. 
Censers. 

71. Shi7<*ozaki, Rihci (Representa- 

tive of Takaoka Bronze 
Merchants' Association), 
Toyamaken — 

Flower vases. 
Flower pots. 
Lamp stands. 
Basins. 

Flower plates. 
Alantel ornaments. " 
Censers. 
Lanterns. 
Ash receivers. 
Cigarette box. 
Card tray. 
Pitcher. 
Flower basin. 
Fire boxes. 

72. Suzuki, Chokichi, Akashi-cho, 

Kyobashi-ku, Tokio — 

Flower vases. 
Mantel ornaments. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



lO' 



73. Suzuki, Kichigoro, Yokoya- 

ma-cho, Nihonbashi-ku, To- 

kio — 
Basins. 

Mantel ornaments. 
Censers. 
Flower pots. 

74. Tachibana, Zcntaro, Osaka- — 

Flower vases. 
Censer. 
Flower pots. 
Umbrella stands. . 

75. Takahashi, Saijiro, Tframa- 

chi-dori, Kioto — 
Lanterns. 
Rell with stand. 

76. Takao, Sadashichi, Kazvara- 

machi, Osaka — 

Flower basins. 

Lamp stand's. 

Flower pots. 

Basins. 

Flower pot stands. 

Mantel ornaments. 

Fire boxes. 

Lanterns.' 

Censers. . 

Electric lanterns. 

Flower basins with electric lamps. 

Umbrella stands. 

Electric lamp stands. 

Lamp shades. 

yy. Takemoto, Kinzaycmon, Azn- 
chi-machi, Osaka — 

Flower vases. 
Fruit plate. 
Flower basket. 
Cake dish. 
Tobacco boxes. 



Ash receiver. 
Censer. 
Vase doily. 

78. Tamahashi, Nisuke, Niigaia — 
Flower vases. 

Cake vessels. 
Cake plates. 
Pitchers. 
Card trays. 
Censer. 

79. Tamakazi'a, Kakuhei, Niiga- 

ta— 
Flower vases. 
Lamp stand. 
Card tray. 

80. Tateno, Nisakichi, Ishikaziv- 
. ken — 

Mantel ornament. 

81. Tsutsumi, Yosojiro, Tcrama- 

chi'dori, Kioto, 
Flower vases. 
Iron kettles. 

82. Watanabe, Chozo, Aioi-clto, 

Yokohama — 
Mantel ornaments. 
Flower vases. 

83. Yamada, Shinsnkc, Mitoshiro- 

cho, Kanda-kii, Tokio — 
Flower vases. 

84. Yamamoto, Meijiro, Takcha- 

ya-cho, Koishikazva-ku, To- 
kio — 

Mantel ornament's. 

Flower vases. 

85. Yawamoto, Naojiro, Takatsu- 

ji-dori, Kioto — 
Flower vases. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Cigar boxes. 



io6 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Card plates. 
Alcohol stove. 
Coifee set. 
Smoking set. 
Ash receivers. 
Tobacco cases. 
Lantern. 

86. Yamamoto, Yaheiji, Niiga- 

ta— 
Flower vases. 
Kettle with alcohol stove. 

87. Yamamoto, Yonezo, Tatatni- 

ya-niachi, Osaka — 
Mantel ornaments. 
Flower basins. 

88. Yamanaka^ Genbet, Terama- 

chi-dori, Kioto — 
Flower vases. 
Cake dishes. 
Mantel ornaments. 

89. Yamanaka Co,, Kitahama, 

Osaka — 
Mantel ornaments. 
Basins. 

Flower basins. 
Lanterns. 
Lamps. 

90. Yoshida, Teiso, Kita-Kinoji- 

machi, Osaka — 
Flower vases. 
Censer. 

Mantel ornaments. 
Electric ornaments. 
Flower pots. 
Lamp stands. 

91. Yoshida, Yasubei, Tominoko- 

ji, Kioto — 
Flower pots. 
Gas lamp stands. 



Flower basins. 

Censers. 

Flower vase stands. 

Lantern. 

92. Yoshikaiva, Magoshiro, Kara- 
sumaru-dori, Kioto — 
Flower vases. 
Lamp stands. 
Flower pots. 
Censer. 

GROUP 34* 

Brushes of Von ous Kinds* 
(Palace of Mantifachsrcs.) 

1. Hachimttra Brush Factory, 

Osaka — 
Tooth brushes. 
Nail brushes. 
Hair brushes. 

2. Isazva, Riichiro, Nishinotoin- 

dori, Kioto — 
Brushes. 

3. Mayekazm, Yohei, Teramachi- 

dori, Kioto- 
Samples of brushes. 

Fine Leather Goods. 

(Palace of Ma&iiiacttifet.) 

T. Fuktti, Genjiro, Kitanaka- 

dori, Yokohama — 
Card cases. 
Purses. 

2. Hashimoto, Tokusaburo, Ota- 

machi, Yokohama — 
Card cases. 
Pocketbooks. 
Purses. 

3. Hodota, Tokichi, Sakai-machi, 

Yokohama — 
Purses. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



107 



4. Ichikawa, Tarokichi, Kawara- 

machi, Asakusa-ku, Tokio — 
Purses. 
Pocketbooks. 
Card cases. 
Cigar cases. 

5. Ishida, Kamekichi, Junket- 

machi, Osaka — 
Boxes. 

Picture frames. 
Bags. 

6. Iwata, Toyo, Yamashita-cho, 

Yokohama — 

Card cases. 
Purses. 

7. Kataki, Tokumatsu, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Leather boxes. 
Cigar boxes. 
Boxes. 

8. Kazcase, Masashichi, Tomot- 

SH'Cho, Osaka — 

Cigarette cases. 
Ladies' purses. 
Pocketbooks. 
Card cases. 
Purses. 
Pencil holder. 

9. Kobayashi, Ryonosuke, Tori- 

Abura-cho, Nihonbashi-ku, 
Tokio — 
Purses. 

10. Kobayashi, Tobei, Tori-Abu- 
ra-cho, Nihonbashi-ku, To- 
kio — 
Purses. 



11. Koyama, Takejiro, Terama- 

chi-dori, Kioto — 
Bags. 

Pocketbooks. 
Purses. 

12. Kumagac, Daijiro, Wakamat- 

su-cho, Nihonbashi-ku, To- 
kio — 

Purses. 

Bags. 

Belts. 

Card case^. 

13. Kmnagae, Uhachi, Yagenbori- 

cho, Nihonbashi-ku, Tokio — 
Purses. 
Pocketbooks. 
Card cases. 
Valise. 
Collar box. 
Cuff box. 
Handkerchief box. 

14. Kutsutani, Takijiro, Ikeno- 

hata, Naka-cho, Shitaya-ku, 

Tokio — 
Purses. 
Bags. 

15. Miyc-ken Paper Tobacco- 

Pouch Merchants' Associa- 
tion, Miye-ken — 

Bags. 

Purses. 

Cigar cases. 

Ladies' pocketbooks. 

Card case. 

16. Nakata, Yonematsu, Nakano- 

cho, Akasaka-ku, Tokio — 
Bracelets with watches. 

17. Ohno, Yasuji, Hyogo-ken — 
Boxes. 

Cigar boxes. 



no 



Japanese Exhibition, 



22. Ikeda, Seisuke, Shimmonzen, 

Kioto — 
Bureau. 
Cabinet. 
Ink stone box. 
Incense box. 
Cake vessel. 
Incense tray. 

23. Imadachi'gun Lacquered Ware 

Merchants' Association, Fu- 

kui-ken — 
Trays. 
Plates. 

Bread plates. 
Handkerchief boxes. 
Lunch trays. 
Cake vessels. 
Cigarette boxes. 
Bowls. 

24. Imamnra, Nanosuke, Honcho, 

Yokohama — 
Trays. 
Plates. 
Dust pans. 

25. Ishiseki, Sanctaro, Minami- 

den ma-cho, Kyohash i-k it, 
Tokio — 
Flower vases. 

26. Kekeno, Ukichi, Takatsuji- 

dori, Kioto — 

Desk. 

Lunch boxes. 

Tray. 

Flower vase stand. 

Cake dish. 

Tables. 
2y. Kanazaiva Lacquer Ware Ex- 
hibitors' Association, Ishika- 
iva-ken — 

Tablets. 

Ink stone boxes. 



Bookcase. 

Boxes. 

Card trays. 

Cigarette boxes. 

Trays. 

Incense boxes. 

Tables. 

Meat plate. 

Flower vase stands. 

Dish. 

Cake vessels. 

Glove boxes. 

Porch shades. 

Paper boxes. 

Card box. 

Ornamental hanging board. 

Cabinet. 

Tray. 

Ring cases. 

Photograph frames. 

Flower vase. 

Stamp pad box. 

Writing brushes. 

Picture frames. 

Medicine chest. 

28. Kashizi'abara, Magozaemon,, 

Tori-cho, Nihonbashi, To- 
kio — 

Glove boxes. 

Cigar cases. 

Finger bowls. 

Ring case. 

Tray. 

Bureau. 

Boxes. 

Ink stone boxes. 

29. Kato, Uhei, Motoyauagi-cho,, 

Kanda-ku, Tokio — 

Travs and incense boxes. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



Ill 



30. Kazvabata, Sashichi, Ima- 

bashi, Osaka — 
Hand box. 
Incense box. 
Trav. 

3 1 . Kaivasaki, Minejiro, Fiikuoka- 

ken — 
Travs. 

Cigarette trays. 
Cigar cases. 
Picture frames. 
Bowl. 
Table. 
Sticks. 

^2. Kawashima, Genjiro, Nit- 
i^ata— 
Tablets. 

Cigarette boxes. 
Boxes. 

33. Kaivashima, Yoshinosuke, 

Ryogaye-machi, Kioto — 
Boxes. 
Cabinet. 
Censer. 
Inkstone box. 
Cigarette box. 
Cake vessels. 
Incense box. 
Tea caddy. 

34. Fitkushima-ken Lacquer Ware 

Merchants* Association, Fu- 

knshima-ken — 
Clothes trays. 
Cigarette boxes. 
Brush trays. 
Card travs. 
Glove box. 
Tray. 

Handkerchief box. 
Tablet. 



Bowl. 
Plate. • 
Cups. 
Trays. 
Cake tray. 

35. Kobayashi, Rionosuke, Tori- 

Abura-cho, Nihonbash-ku, 
Tokio — 
Cuff and collar case and belt. 

36. Kobayashi, Tomitaro, Benten- 

dori, Yokohama — 
Book case. 
F'olding screens. 
Tablets. 

37. Kobayashi, Toyemon, Tori- 

cho, Nihonbash-ku, Tokio — 
Finger bowls. 
Box. 

Umbrella box. 
Trays. 
Tablet. 

Cigarette box. 
Cigarette tray. 
Collar box. 
Napkin rings. 

38. Komayei, Zensuke {Repre- 

sentative of Takaoka Lac- 
quer Ware Merchants' Asso- 
ciation), Toyama-ken — 

Boxes. 

Trays. 

Cigarette cases. 

Stationerv articles. 

Folding screen. 

Basin. 

Handkerchief boxes. 

Book cases. 

Tables. 

Tov box. 

Cupboard. 



J 



112 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Glove box. 
Cake vessel. 
Tablets. 
Bureau. 

Photograph box. 
Tobacco box. 

39. Komaki, Bunjiro, Choja- 

machi, Yokohama — 

Card tray. 

40. Koyania, Kinrpei, Niigafa — 

Stand and inkstone box. 
Ornament stand. 
Tray. 
Sample board. 

41. Koyama, Tsnncjiro, Awaji- 

cho, Kanda-kit, Tokio — 

Chests. 
Box. 

42. Kuroda, Mosnkc, Nagoya — 
Boxes. 

Travs. 

Thread boxes. 
Postal card boxes. 
Cigarette boxes. 
Cake chests. 
Pocket cups. 
Finger bowls. 
Smoking sets. 
Tooth brush boxes. 
Glove boxes. 
Handkerchief boxes. 
Paint boxes. 
*'Kyokuroku" arm rests. 
Card boxes. 
Ring casket. 

43. Machida, Chonosukc, Gifu — 

Travs. 
Cake vessels. 



44. Maki, Kinhei, Hottgo, 3 

Chome, Tokio — 
Tray. 
Tea trays. 
Cake trays. 
Card trays. 
Tobacco cases. 
Tobacco boxes. 
Postal card boxes. 
Stamp boxes. 
Cup. 

45. Maruichi Upholstery Co., 

Nagasaki — 

Napkin rings. 

Finger bowls. 

Collar box. 

Cuff box. 

Small boxes. 

Tables. 

Cabinet. 

Picture frames. 

l^mbrella stands. 

Flower vases. 

Bureaus. 

Wooden plates. 

Face powder vessels. 

Pin boxes; 

Glove box. 

46. Mats II bay ash i, Sad ash ichi, 

Kintaro-machi, Osaka — 

Tea service. 

Travs. 

Gymnastic apparatus. 

Clothes racks. 

Boxes. 

Cake dishes. 

Incense box. 

Flower vases. 

Beer boxes. 

Handkerchief box. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



Ii.5 



Glove box. 
Folding screen. 
Flower basket. 

47. Midsutani, Tetsuso, Na- 

goya— 
Book cases. 
Box. 
Tablets. 
Screens. 
Folding screens. 

48. Mikami Heijiro, Aotnari- 

ken — 
Document box. 
Perfumery chest. 
Book case. 

Cigarette case with tray. 
Tray. 

49. Mikami, Jisaburo, Takatsuji, 

Yanagino-Bamba, Kioto — 
Flower vases. 
Cigarette box. 
Jewel casket. 
Cake vessel. 
Cigarette case. 
Box. 

Handkerchief box. 
Card tray. 
Tablet. 
Panel board. 
Folding screens. 
Cabinet. 

50. Munemura, Keikichi, Nii- 

gata— 
Travs. 
Tablets. 

51. Miiraia, Kimbei, Kauasc-Ko- 

kn-cho, Nihonbashi-ku, To- 

kio — 
Boxes. 

Incense boxes. 
Incense chests. 



52. Nakamura, Zenkichi, Aomori- 

ken — 
Cigarette box. 
Perfumery chest. 
Cake box. 
Tray. 
Cabinet. 

53. Nara Lacquered Ware Mer- 

chants' Association, Nara — 
Lacquered wares. 

54. Nishitnura, Hikobei, Tera- 

machi, Ayanokoji, Kioto — 
Photograph racks. 
Cabinet. 

Cigarette boxes. 
Travs. 
Jewel casket. 

55. Nisshin Lacquered Ware Fac- 

tory, Naka-cho, Koishi- 
. kaiva-ku, Tokio — 
Boxes. 
Glove box. 
Cigarette boxes. 

56. Nomura Yoso, Hon-cho, Yo- 

kohama — 
Book case. 
Folding screens. 

57. Obara, Jingoyemon, Toya- 

ma-ken — 
Cigar box and screens. 

58. Oi, Inomatsu, Niigata — 
Trav. 

Pitcher with trav. 

Tablet. 

Cake vessel. 

Handkerchief box. 

Trays. 

Box and card trav. 

Tea service in basket. 

Boxes. 



114 



Japanese Exhibition, 



59. Ono, Yukichi, Gorobei-cho, 

Kyobashi'ku, Tokio — 
Glove boxes. 

60. Otomo, Gennosuke, Takatsu 

Takakura, Kioto — 
Umbrella stands. 

61. Saito Masakichi, Ginza, Kyo- 

bashi'ku, Tokio — 
Tobacco boxes. 
Lacquered trays. 
Boxes. 

Desk ornament. 
Face powder box. 
Lacquered instruments. 
Tea service. 

62. Sano, Kashichi, Shinyemon- 

cho, Nihonbashi-ku, To- 
kio — 
Tablets. 

63. Sanuki Lacquered Ware Mer- 

chants' Association, Ka- 

gawa-ken — 
Cake vessels. 
Coffee trays. 
Tables. 
Boxes. 

Censer stand. 
Stand. 

Inkstone box. 
Trays. 

Cigarette box. 
Balls. 
Tea box. 
Cake dish. 
Cake bowl. 

64. Sasaki, Takayasu, Honkoku- 

cho, Nihonbashi'ku, To- 
kio — 
Cake dish. 



65. Shibakawa, Matayemon, Fu- 

shimi-cho, Osaka — 
Trays. 
Bread trays. 
Bowl. 

Incense tray. 
Plate. 

Coffee plate. 
Cake trays. 
Wooden plate. 
Photograph frame. 
Lunch box. 
Flower vases. 
Tablet. 

Cigarette cases. 
Glove boxes. 
Incense boxes. 
Beer plates. 
Screen. 

66. Shibata, Matakichi, Hinode- 

cho, Yokohama — 
Necktie box. 
Fan box. 
Bureau. 

67. Shiznoka Lacquered Ware 

Merchants' Association, Shi- 

zuoka — 
Boxes. 
Trays. 

Panel boards. 
Stands. 
Cabinets. 
Tables. 
Glove boxes. 
Bureaus. 
Bread plates. 
Folding screens. 
Doll's utensils. 
Photograph racks. 
Tablets. 
Handkerchief boxes. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



II 



Button boxes. 
Incense boxes. 
Trays. 
Ring casket. 
Cake vessels. 
Cigarette boxes. 
Perfume cabinets. 
Hat stands. 
Stove screens. 
Pen boxes. 
Cigar holders. 
Doors. 
Desks. 
Small boxes. 
Flower vase stands. 
Lamp stands. 
Flower vases. • 
Toilet' cases. 
Photograph frames. 
Card plates. 
Houses. 

Mantel ornaments. 
Book cases. 
Stands. 
Small boxes. 
Coffee. 
Needle cases. 
Bowls. 

Needle boxes. 
Cabinet. 

Looking gla^s stand. 
Tea box. 
Lacquered ware. 
Card boxes. 
Cake boxes. 
Dust pans. 
Bread plate. 
Handkerchief boxes. 
Face powder boxes. 
Perfume boxes. 
Pen plate. 



Postal card boxes. 
Cake boxes. 
Tobacco boxes. 
Pins. 

68. Shikki Jusan Kwaisha, Aom- 

ori-ken — 
Cake boxes. 
Trays. 

Photograph frame. 
Cake vessel. 
Flower basins with stands. 

69. Shikko Goshikwaisha, Yumi- 

cho, Kyobash-ku, Tokio — 
Boxes. 

Letter holders. 
Hanging shelves. 
Ornament stand. 
Cigar boxes. 
Trays. 

70. Shimidzu, 



sentative 
Lacquer 



Iwataro (Repre- 
of Toyatnaken 
Ware Merchants'* 
Association, Toyamaken — 
Trays. 
Tablets. 

Handkerchief boxes. 
Panel boards. 
Cane. 

71. Shiratori, Zingoro, Sakamoto- 

cho, Nihonbashi-ku, To- 
kyo— 
Tea caddies. 

72. Shuzui, Shozaburo, Nagoya — 
Box and inkstone box. 

Table. 

Cigarette cases. 
Smoking set. 
Lacquered ware. 
Pen cases. 
Incense boxes. 



ii6 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Trays. 
Butter dish. 
Box. 
Pin box. 

Face powder box. 
Tea caddies. 
Card trays. 
Cake vessel. 
Inkstone box. 

73. Sudo, Masao, Shin-Suwa-cho, 

Koishikawa-ku, Tokyo — 
Flower vases. 
Trays. 

74. Sugiyama, Shunzo, Sioi-cho, 

Yokohama— r 
Book cases. 
Tablets. 

75. Suzuki, Kichigoro, Yoko- 
. yama-cho, Nihonbashi-ku, 

Tokyo — 
Incense boxes. 
Trays. 
Box. 

76. Tanaka, Yahei, Shijo Yana- 

ginO'bamba, Kyoto — 
Boxes. 

Incense boxes. 
Looking-glass stands. 
Glpve boxes. 
Table. 
Tray. 

y/. Tanaka, Yasuzumi, Iriye- 
cho, Honjo'ku, Tokyo — 
Tooth brushes. 

78. Tanaka & Company, Hon- 
machi, Osaka — 
Boxes. 

Stove screen. 
Tablet. 
Cabinets. 



Trays. 

Chest. 

Mantel ornaments. 

Fruit tray. 

Postal card box. 

Cake vessels. 

Screens. 

Glove boxes. 

Beer trays. 

Photograph racks. 

79. Tetsuka, Heiyemon, Kitaho- 

riye-dori, Osaka — 
Boxes. 

Cigarette boxes. 
Photograph rack. 
Finger bowl. 
Food vessels. 
Buckets. 
Panel boards. 
Trays. 

80. T omit a, Koshichi, Sawaragi- 

cho, Horikawa, Kioto — 
Card holders. 
Lacquered board. 
Umbrella handles. 

81. Tomon, Gohei, Asuchi-machi, 

Osaka — 
Cake boxes. 
Fruit tra}^;s. 
Boxes. 
Travs. 

82. Toshiyasu, Bunshiro, Hyo go- 

ken — 
Cigarette boxes. 
Picture frames. 
Handkerchief boxes. 

83. Tsujimura, Yentaro, Tansu- 

machi, Shitaya-ku, Tokio — 
Box. 
Mantel ornament. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



117 



84. Tsutada, Yeisaburo, Yaziata- 

stiji, Osaka — 
Cabinet. 
Tablets. 

Cigarette boxes. 
Coffee trays. 

Coffee cups with saucers. 
Fruit vessel. 

85. Uwotsu Shikkokzvai, Toyama- 

ken — 
Trays. 

Flower vases. 
Penholders. 
Dust pan. 
Beer stand. 
Boxes. 

86. IVajima Exhibitors' Associa- 

tion, Ishikawa-ken — 
Trays. 

Cigarette boxes. 
Stamp trays. 
Finger bowls. 
Flower vase stands. 
Beer cups. 
Stick holders. 
Handkerchief boxes. 
Toilet cases. 
Boxes. 
Tea trays. 
Bowl. 
Soup dish. 
Coffee set. 
Clothes trays. 
Card trays. 
Tables. 
Glove boxes. 
Flower vases. 
Tablets. 
Cake boxes. 
Tea caddy. 
Box. 



Fruit boxes. 
Inkstone box. 
Fruit plates. 
Bowls. 
Bread plates. 
Paper boxes. 
Towel trays. 
Cigarette trays. 
Clothes bars. 
Fruit bowl. 
Meat platter. 

87. Wakamatsu Lacquered Ware 

Merchants' Association, Fu- 
kushimaken — 
Travs. 

w 

Glove boxes. 
Cake vessels. 
Hat rack. 
Lacquered board. 
Boxes. 

Cigarette boxes. 
Flower vases. 

88. JVakasa Lacquered IV are 

Merchants* Association, Fu- 

kuiken — 
Clothes boxes. 
Ornament stands. 
Card trays. 
Trays. 

Clothes horse. 
Cigarette boxes. 
Photograph holders. 
Letter box. 
Cake vessels. 
Flower vases. 
Boxes. 

Smoking pipes. 
Handkerchief boxes. 
Glove boxes. 
Coffee plates. 
Photograph frames. ; 



ii8 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Canes. 

Incense boxes. 
Screens. 
Penholders. 
Bowls. 

89. IVatanabe, Kanyemon, Kana- 

gawa-ken — 
Stationery articles. 
Vegetable vessels. 
Trays. 
Spice case. 

90. Yamamuro, Asakichi, Sumi- 

yoshi-cho, Yokohama — 
Incense boxes. 
Tablets. 
Coffee trays. 
Covered vessels. 
Handkerchief boxes. 
Photograirfi frames. 
Glove boxes. 
Samples. 
Sticks. 
Cue. 
Stands. 
Folding screens. 

91. Yamanaka Lacquered Ware 

Merchants* Association, Ish- 

ikawa-ken — 
Cake vessels. 
Bowls. 
Bread plates. 
Flower pots. 
Finger bowls. 
Plates. 
Tea caddies. 
Trays. 

Cigarette boxes. 
"Sake" cups. 
Pin boxes. 
Flower vases. 



Ornamental bowls. 

Tablet. 

Collar boxes. 

Lacquered ornaments. 

Boxes. 

Watch holder. 

Cake stand. 

Beer cups. 

Incense box. 

Thread boxes. 

Beer trays. 

Ring casket. 

Jewel casket. 

Table. 

Ash receivers. 

Looking-glass stands. 

Horse race. 

Bread boxes. 

Covered vessels. 

Small plates. 

92. Yasui, Shokichi, Tsukiji, Ky- 

obashi'ku, Tokio — 

Cigarette boxes. 
Ring chests. 
Boxes. 

93. Ye garni, Sadajiro, Nagasa- 

ki— 
Lacquered wares. 

Fancy Articles* 
(Palace of Varied Indoitrics.) 

1. Asai, Sekisei, Tajibana-cho, 

Nihonbashi-ku, Tokio — 

Photograph frames. 

2. Chasenshoku, Kumiai {Tea 

Beatermakers' Association ) , 
Naraken — 

Tea beaters. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



IVJ 



3. Goto, Kamataro, Kanagawa- 

ken — 
Mantel ornaments. 
Boxes. 
Glove boxes. 
Postal card boxes. 
Handkerchief box. 
Inkstone boxes. 
Cigarette boxes. 
Incense boxes. 
Incense trays. 
Cake plates. 
Cake vessels. 

4. Honda, Tokujiro, Tennoji, 

Uyenomiya-machi, Osaka — 
Flower vases. 
Mantel ornaments. 

5. Honda, Yosaburo, Nagoya — 
Pagoda. 

6. Ishikawa-ken Chokoku Ex- 

hibitors' Association, Ishi- 

kazva-ken — 
Tablets. 

Inkstand and ink stone box. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Panels for doors. 
Cigarette case. 
Ring rack. 
Watch stand. 
Ring case. 
Tobacco boxes. 

7. Ito, Kohei, Niigata — 
Fan. 

Cigarette boxes. 
Cigarette tray. 
Sample board. 



9. Kato, Chohei, Gifu — 
Glove boxes. 
Cigarette boxes. 
Cabinets. 

Photograph holders. 
Photo stand. 
Handkerchief boxes. 
Carvings. 
Cigar boxes. 

10. Kato, Kikumatsu, Yagenbori- 

cho, Nihonbashi'ku, Tokio — 
Cigar case. 
Card tray. 
Cigar box. 
Incense box. 
Buckle. 
Cravats. 

Watch ornaments. 
Umbrella handle. 
Flower vase. 

11. Katsura, Mitsuharu, Tokio — 

fu- 
Cigarette case. 

12. Kawase, Masashichi, Totno- 

tsucho, Osaka — 
Lady's purse. 
Cigarette cases. 
Pocketbooks. 
Card cases. 

13. Kobayashi, 

Abura-cho, 
Tokio — 
Purses. 



Tobei, Tori- 
Nihonbashi'ku, 



8. Kanazawa, Naraichi, 
ken — 
Fancy articles. 



Nara- 



14. Komaki, Bunjiro, Kanagawa- 
ken — 
Frame work. 
Doily. 
Spoon. 
Light shade. 
Pin cushion. 



120 



Japanese Exhibition, 



15. Kiitsutani, Takijiro, Ikeno- 

hata, Naka-cho, Shitaya-ku, 

Tokio — 
Cuff buttons. 
Buckles. 
Necktie pins. 
Tobacco boxes. 
Cigarette cases. 

16. Kintikawa, Yeikichi, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Mantel ornaments. 
Gongs. 

17. Matsubashi, Masazo, Aiiaji- 

cho, Osaka — 
Pocketbooks. 
Card case. 
Cigarette case. 
Purses. 
Bags. 

18. Matsuyoshi, Kahei, Bingo- 

machi, Osaka — 
Toothpicks. 
Toothpick cases. 

ig. Miyata, Tatar 0, Benten-dori, 
Yokohama — 
Handkerchief box. 
Glove boxes. 
Plate doilies. 

20. Miyauchi, Ryosiikc, Tori- 

Shimo-cho, Nihonhashi-kti, 
Tokio — 
Photograph frames. 

21. Nissei Kn^an, Hyogo-kcn — 
Fancy articles. 

22. Okamoto, Rihei, Motomachi- 

dori, Kobe — 
"Netsuke." 

23. Sakurai, Yeizo, Sukiya-cho, 

Shitaya-ku, Tokio — 
Cigarette cases. 



24. Suzuki, Kojiro, Suga-cho, 

Asakusa-ku, Tokyo — 
Trays. 

25. Takata, Saijiro, Tokyo — 
Todthpicks. 

Purses. 

26. Takito & Company, Nagoya — 
Tablets. 

27. Tokuoka, Sakubei, Minami- 

Kinhoji-machi, Osaka — 
Purses. 
Pocketbook. 
Button cases. 
Card cases. 
Bags. 

28. Toshiyama, Yonejiro, Mina- 

mi-Kinhoji-machi, Osaka — 
Flower vase. . 

29. IVatanabe, Tokuhei, Shinye- 

mon-cho, Nihonbashi-ku, 
Tokio — 
Mantel ornaments. 

30. Yamamoto, Seizo, Houzaimo- 

ku'Cho, Nihonbashi-ku, To- 

kio — 
Cigarette cases. 
Pocketbooks. 
Bag. 

31. Yamanaka, Go, Kitahaxa^ 

Osaka — 
Trays, 
Lamps. 

32. Yanagiwara, Tsunehiro, Shi- 

mane-ken — 
Tablet. 
Glove boxes. 
Collar boxes. 
Tobacco boxes. 



International Exposition. St. Louis, 1904. 



121 



33. Yokoyama, Shin-ichiro, Hash- 

imotO'Cho, Kanda-ku, To- 

kio — 
Bags. 
Satchels. 

34. Yoshisaki, Tsuncshichi, Min- 

ami'Kinhoji-machi, Osaka — 
Purses. 

35. Yiibu, Uyemon, Toyamaken — 

Photograph frame. 
Stands. 

Ivorf and Tortoise Shell Works. 

(Palaces of Manufactures and Varied 
Industries.) 

1. Fujiwara, Ihei, Yazvata- 

machi, Osaka — 
Mantel ornaments. 
Umbrella handle. 
Small boxes.* 

2. Futayedo, Teijiro, Nagasaki- 

ken — 
Folding fans. 
Tablet. 

Toilet articles. 
Hair dressing articles. 
Combs. 
Pins. 
Hat pins. 
Lady's card cases. 
Lady's spectacles. 
Gentleman's combs. 
Photograph frames. 
Photograph albums. 
Paper knives. 
Cigarette boxes. 
Cigarette cases. 
Dining utensils. 



3. Ikcdo, Chotaro, Nagasaki- 

ken — 
Cigarette cases. 
Tablet. 

Gentleman's toilet set. 
Brushes. 

Lady's spectacles. 
Gentleman's comb. 
Paper knife. 
Combs. 
Card cases. 
Lady's fancy combs. 
Hat pins. 
Hair pins. 
Folding fans. 
Pin cases. 
Looking-glasses. 

4. Ikeda, Seisuke, Shinmonzen, 

Kioto — 
Mantel ornaments. 

5. Kaneda, Kanejiro, Oga-cho, 

Kyobashi'kti, To kio — 
Mantel ornaments. 

6. Kato, Toyoshicho, Bakuro- 

cho, Nihonbashi'ku, To- 

kio — 
Mantel ornaments. 
Toilet sets. 
Combs. 
Card cases. 
Umbrella handles. 
Satchel. 
Folding fans. 
Candlesticks. 
Book marks. 

7. Kikuchi, Yeijiro, Kita- 

Tazcara-cho, Asakusa-ku, 

Tokio — 
Satchel. 
Folding fan. 



122 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Cigar cases. 

Gourds. 

Hair ornaments. 

Fans. 

Tablet. 

8. Kobayashi, Kojiro, Suga-cho, 

Asakusa-ku, Tokio — 
Mantel ornaments. 
Folding screens. 
Bookcase. 

9. Kayama, Takejiro, Tera- 

machi, Oshikoji, Kioto — 
Mantel ornaments. 

10. Murata, Kichigoro, Yoko- 

yama-cho, Nihonbashi-ku, 

Tokio — 
Mantel ornaments. 
Flower vases. 
Cake vessel. 
Umbrella handles. 
Paper knives. 
Box. 

Card cases. 
"Netsuke." 

11. Nakamura, Sosuke, Tachi- 

bana-cho, Nihonbashi-ku, 
Tokio — 
Mantel ornaments. 

12. Noboriyama, Chozo, Ginza, 

Kyobashi-ku, Tokio — 
Mantel ornaments. 

13. Nomura, Yozo, Hon-cho, Yo- 

kohama — 
Mantel ornaments. 

14. Noboriyama, Kinzo, Masago- 

cho, Yokohama — 
Mantel ornaments. 



15. Okamoto, Rihei, Motomachi, 

Kobe— 
"Netsuke." 

16. O machi, Ycijiro (Ogibashi- 

cho, Fukagawa-ku) and Yo- 
yotsugi, Tomigoro (Yagen- 
bori'Cho, Nihonbashi-ku ) , 
Tokio — 
Mantel ornaments. 



Nagasaki- 



17. Sakata, Yeitaro, 

ken — 
Toilet articles. 
Glove box. 
Plates. 

Picture in frame. 
Boxes. 

Spoon and fork. 
Combs. 

Tobacco cases. 
Brushes. 
Spectacles. 
Hair pins. 
Card cases. 

18. Shibata, Matakichi, Hinode- 

cho, Yokohama — 
Mantel ornaments. 
"Netsuke." 

19. Soma, Kiminosuke, Heiye- 

mon-cho, Asakusa-ku, To- 
kio — 
Mantel ornaments. 

20. Suzuki, Nobuyoshi, Nishi- 

Misuji-machi, Asakusa-ku, 
Tokio — 
Mantel ornaments. 

21. Suzuki, Kichigoro, Yoko- 

yama-cho, Nihonbashi-ku, 
Tokio — 
Mantel ornaments. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



123 



22. Tanaka, Iwakichi, Nagasaki- 

ken — 
Card cases. 
Combs. 
Brushes. 
Boxes. 
Pins. 

Spectacles. 
Tablets. 
Tobacco cases. 
Toilet cases. 
Umbrella handle. 
Photograph frames. 
Folding fans. 
Buckles. 
Spoon and fork. 
Paper knives. 
Tortoise shell. 
Gentleman's toilet set. 
Lady's toilet set. 

23. Takenoya, Daisaburo, Nishi- 

Take-cho, Honjo-ku, To- 
kio — 
Mantel ornaments. 

24. Uyeno, Shinshichi, Bukkoji, 

Yanaginobamba, Kioto — 
Combs. 
Hairpins. 

25. Vanianaka, Shigejiro, Kita- 

hama, Osaka — 
Mantel ornaments. 

26. Yasaki, Yeizo, Nagasaki — 
Match box. 

Pin. 
Nail-file case. 

Basket Works. 

(Palace of Mantiiactttrea.) 

I. Chiam-sian-lam, Shinchiku, 

Formosa — 
Bamboo baskets. 



2. Chiani'tin-kiong, Shinchiku, 

Formosa — 
Bamboo basket. 

3. Fujikaiva, Ruizo, Taihoku, 

Formosa — 
Pocketbooks. 
Cigarette cases. 

4. Ftikui, Genjiro, Kitanaka- 

dori, Yokohama — 
Pen trays. 
Trays. 

5. Hattori, Seisaburo, Bakuro- 

cho, Osaka — 
Osier valises. 
Dining utensil. 
Glove cases. 
Handkerchief case. 
Cake vessel. 
Letter holders. 



Tochigi- 



6. lidzuka, Kikuji, 

ken — 
Flower baskets. 
Cake baskets. 
Traveling baskets. 

7. Inaba, Shaku, Koshun, For- 

mosa — 
Cigarette cases. 

8. Ishiseki, Sanetaro, Minami- 

denma-cho, Kyobashi-ku, 

Tokio — 
Basket work trays. 
Paper boxes. 
Flower vessels. 

9. Kakuriu Goshikwaisha, Hio- 

go-ken — 
Baskets. 
Valises. 



124 



Japanese Exhibition, 



10. Kosuge, Kenzo, Shinioniaki- 

cho, Nihonbashi-ku, To- 

kio — 
Flower baskets. 
Travs. 

11. Kuroda, Denjiro, Oshikoji, 

Tominokoji, Kiotc — 
Dipper. 
Flower vessel. 
Knives, forks and spoons. 
Cake vessel- 
Fan rack. 

12. Matsnki, Bunkio, Kano-mac/ti, 

Kobe— 
Valises. 

13. Morita, Shintaro, Sanjo-Ha- 

hashihigashi, Kiotc — 
Stools. 

Flower baskets. 
Waste paper baskets. 
Baskets. 
Basketwork valise. 

14. Nakabe, Toranosiikc, Sanno- 

miya, Kobe — 
Valises. 

Handerchief boxes. 
Glove boxes. 
Collar box. 
Flower basket. 
Plate basket. 
Waste paper basket. 
Bottle case. 
Lamp shades. 
Slippers. 
Soap boxes. 
Satchel. 

15. Nakai, Go, Sannoniiya, 

Kobe— 
Bamboo work samples. 



16. Oka, Ihei, Tamaya-macln\ 

Osaka — 
Hanging flower baskets. 
Flower baskets. 
Flower pot baskets. 

17. Okubo, Rishichi, Kagawa- 

ken — 
Bamboo works. 
Satchels. 
Rattles. 
Tea strainers. 



Branch, 



18. Seishin Kivaisha 

Kobe— 
Dress suit cases. 
Baskets. 
Tea boxes. 
Pails. 
Valise. 
Covers. 
Paper baskets. 
Handkerchief cases. 
Glove cases. 
Bread boxes. 
Paper boxes. 
Satchels. 

Waste paper baskets. 
Cake vessels. 
Letter holders. 
Trays. 
Folding screens. 

19. Shisuoka Lacquered Ware 

Merchants' Association, Shi- 

Ziioka — 
Cake baskets. 
Trays. 
Cages. 

Miniature houses. 
Cake bowls. 
Photograph frames. 
Canes. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



125 



Waste paper baskets. 
Hats. 

Soap baskets. 
Glove baskets. 
Handkerchief boxes. 
Cake trays. 
Flower vessels. 
Folding screen. 
Cake vessels. 
Insect cages. 
Bread baskets. 
Fruit baskets. 
Photograph racks. 

:20. Sudzuki, Kojiro, Suga-cho, 
Asakusa-ku, Tokio — 
Flower baskets. 

:2i. Taiko Hat and Matting Man- 
ufacturing Co., Byoritsu, 
Formosa — 
Plate doilies. 

22. Takata, Namiya, Iwate-ken — 
Flower vessel. 

23. Yamanaka Co., Kitahama, 

Osaka — 
Flower baskets. 
Baskets. 

GROUP 35. 

Articles for TraveUns and for 

Compins:* 

(Palace of Mantsfactures.) 

1. Akamatsu, Kumashichi, Mi- 

nami'Honmachi, Osaka — 
Trunk. 

2. Fujikawa, Rinso, Taihoku, 

Formosa (installed in Japan- 
ese section, Palace of Agri- 
culture). 
Trunks. 



3. Hayami, Kichihei, Teramachi- 

dori, Kioto — 
Osier trunk. 

4. Inaba, Shaku, Koshun, For- 

mosa — 
V^alises and material. 

5. Hayashi, Daisaku.Kitakintaro- 

machi, Osaka ( installed in 
Japanese section. Palace of 
Agriculture). 
Trunks. 

6. Kato, Yeizo, Gifu-ken — 
Osier valises. 

7. Kawasaki, Hiotaro, Osaka- 

fu- 
Hammocks. 

8. Kitamura, Chozayemon, Hio- 

go-ken — 
Osier valises. 

9. Kudzukago, Kiubei, Minami- 

kintaro-machi, Osaka — 
Osier valises. 

10. Midzuhara, Genjiro, Shinsai- 

bashi-dori, Osaka — 
Trunks. 

11. Nakaye, Sennan, Shin-machi, 

Osaka — 
Trunks. 

12. Xishibori, Yaichi, Gifu-kcn — 
Osier valises. 



13. Ogaii'a, Jisuke, 
Osaka — 
Osier valises. 



Bakuro-cho, 



14. Sliindo, Kiunajiro, Sanjo-dori, 
Kioto — 
Osier valises. 



126 



Japanese Exhibition, 



15- Uyeda, Gisaburo, Hiogo- 
ken — 
Osier valises. 

i6. Yendo, Kakichiro, Hiogo- 
ken — 
Osier valises. 
Valises. 
Paper box. 
Card case. 

GROUP 36. 
Toys. 

(Palace of Manisfacturcs.) 

1. Asai, Sekisei, Tachibuna-cho, 

Nihonbashi-ku, Tokio — 
Toy bird cages. 

2. Asaoka, Iwataro, Hatago-cho, 

Kanda-ku, Tokio — 
Toys. 

3. Fukui, Genjiro, Kitanaka-dori, 

Yokohama — 
Toys. 

4. Fukuoka & Hakata Doll 

Traders' Association, Fukuo- 
kaken — 
Dolls. 

5. Hakonc, Bussan, Goshikwai- 

sha, Kanagawa-ken — 
Toys. 

6. Hattori, Manji, lida-machi, 

Kojimachi'ku, Tokio — 
Dolls. 
Samples of toys. 

7. Inouye, Seisuke, Fukuoka- 

ken — 
Dolls. 

8. Kioto Joshi'Shus^ei Gakko — 



n 



Oshiye." 



9. Kitashimisu, Katsuzo, Tofni- 
nokoji'dori, Kioto — 
Toys. 

10. Kojima, Hyakuso, Goken-cho, 

Kanda-ku, Tokio — 
Toys. 

11. Marutoku Taniguchi Branch 

Store, Nunobiki-dori, Kobe — 
Toys. 
Birds. 

12. Misaki, Seijiro, Shijo-dori, 

Kioto — 
Dolls. 

13. Murai, Kiyemon (Representa- 

tive of Osaka Doll Manufac- 
turers' Association), Kita- 
Kintaro-machi, Osaka — 
Dolls. 

14. Murakami, At sushi, Maruya- 

ma, Kioto — 
Toys. 

15. Murakami, Go, Shirokane-Dai- 

machi, Shiba-ku, Tokio — 
Dolls. 
Toys. 

16. Murase, Shichisaburo, Aichi- 

ken — 
Dolls. 

17. Nakai Company, Sannomiya, 

Kobe- 
Toy chairs. 

18. Obitani, Shishichi, Nagasaki — 
Kites, 

String. 

19. Oka, Ihei, Tamaya-cho, 

Osaka — 
Whistles. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



127 



20. Oki, Heizo, Shijo-dori, 

Kioto — 
Dolls. 

21. Okuda, Riujitsu, Higashi-Ku- 

romon-cho, Shitaya-ku, To- 
kio — 
Toys and dolls. 

22. Sakuta, MagobeiyBingo-machi, 

Osaka — 
Dolls. 

23. Sato, Tetsujiro, Mishiro-cho, 

Nihonbashi'ku, Tokio — 
Stereoscopes. 
Photographs. 

24. Shinano, Katnetaro, Kita-Kin- 

hoji-machi, Osaka — 
Toys. 

25. Suzuki, Kojiro, Suga-cho, 

Asakusa-kuj Tokio — 
Dolls. 

26. Tajimi Trading Co,, Gifu- 

ken — 
Toys. 

27. Takada, Seijiro, Muko-Vana- 

giwara-machi, Asakusa-ku, 

ToBtO — : 

Toys. 

28. Takenouchi, Masujiro, Nedsu- 

Kata-machi, Hongo-ku, To- 
kio — 
Dolls. 

29. Takenouchi, Takizo, Hiogo- 

ken — 
Cigar holder. 
Cake vessel. 
Paper boxes. 
Bureaus. 
Photograph holders. 



30. Tanabe, Zenshiro, Kamezawa- 

cho, Honjo-ku, Tokio — 
Toys. 

31. Tanaka, Shokichi, Kanagawa- 

ken — 

Toy eggs. 
Toys. 

32. Taniguchi, Tokujiro, Musha- 

nokoji-dori, Kioto — 

Dolls. 
Toys. 
Birds. 

33. Wakano, Sobei, Osaka-fu — 
Kites. 

34. Watanabe, Kanyemon, Kana- 

gazva-ken — . 

Self-shampooing device. 

Cups. 

Toys. 

35. Watanabe, Tsunatada, Kana- 

gawa-ken — 
Educational toys. 

36. Yasui, Ktyoshi, Nishiki-cho, 

Kanda-ku, Tokio — 

Models of animals. 

GROUP 37* 

Decoration ond Fixed Furniture* 
(Palace of Varied Induitries,) 

I. Kawashima, Jimbei, Kyoto — 
A room with decorative furniture. 

The design of this room is by Mr. 
Jimbei Kawashima, artist to the Im- 
perial Household. The fabrics and 
embroideries are from his factorv 
in Kyoto, Japan. 



128 



Japanese Exhibition, 



The carving, lacquering, casting, 
etc., are by specialists in each line, 
aud were executed under the super- 
intendence of Mr. Kawashima. 

The room being designed for a 
study, is fitted up in the "current 
style" and its decoration belongs to 
a new style strictly in Japanese 
taste. 

The wood used as building ma- 
terial is mulberry, which is indi- 
genous to Japan. 

Bamboo is also used, since it is a 
specific product of the East. Bam- 
boo that grow in Japan are particu- 
larly straight and hard-grained. 

The lacquer work is done solelv 
by litharge painting, an art much 
cultivated during the Nara Epoch. 

The ceiling represents the marks 
on tortoise shell. The tortoise is 
regarded as a type of longevity. 
Being supposed to live a myriad 
years, it suggests an auspicious 
meaning. The lines that describe 
the hexagon in the center are pro- 
duced in six different directions, di- 
viding the whole ceiling into seven 
compartments. This is an entirely 
novel plan, as all common coffered 
ceilings are figured in squares. In- 
side the hexagon is laid a silk em- 
broidery representing phoenix. 

The six compartments around the 
hexagon are filled with lat- 
tice work — fretted and netted alter- 
nately — of split bartiboo, browned by 
smoking process. 

Where the ceiling joins the walls 
it has semicircles described by lines 
displaying conventionalized forms 



of birds in imitation of designs irr 
the Sho-so-in collection. The inter- 
spaces are filled with a net work of 
bamboo having underlying gold 
brocade. 

• The walls are draped with silk 
damask bearing a design of chrys- 
anthemum leaves on a dull silver 
ground. 

The skirting is in the form of a 
bamboo fence with alternate eleva- 
tions on the top, so as to show the 
projecting and receding parts of the 
fence. The supporting shafts are 
made of mulberry wood. 

The fence is a networl: of 
browned bamboo, carrying in gold 
lacquer a decoration of various 
figures of primeval vessels and im- 
plements such as we found in dol- 
mens, or sepulchral mounds. 

The curtain hanging over the 
doorway is of Shigara Embroidery, 
representing flowers and birds after 
the Todaiji fashion. The curtains 
hanging over the windows are of 
TsiidztirC'Nish iki tapestry, repre- 
senting cherry trees with shrubs, 
flying birds and running animals, 
which are enclosed in an oblong cir- 
cle with irregular depressions at the 
four comers. This figure is called 
Kwagata. On the outside of this en- 
closure are flowers, birds and ani- 
mals so intermixed that the whole 
presents a rich and gorgeous ap- 
pearance. The figures and designs 
are derived from decorations seen 
in the Sho-so-in collection, as also 
from a piece of old tapestry dating 
from the Tempo era and preserved 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



129 



to this day on account of its special 
design and weaving. The colored 
threads left free at the end form 
fringes, which is the original form 
of all fringes. The pendant cords 
are knotted in the Hankiu style, 
namely, that used by a Jc^u prince 
in olden times. 

The floor is in mosaic composed 
of irregularly shaped pieces of 
hard wood. It presents an appear- 
ance of cracked ice. This is de- 
signed to contrast with the crusta- 
ceous appearance of the ceiling. 

2, Kyoto Chamber of Commerce, 
Kyoto — 
A salon. 

The Kypto Salon consists of two 
wings connected by a corridor in 
front and by a passage in the parti- 
tion wall separating the two. Access 
to either wing may be had by means 
of sliding screen doors in the pas- 
sage as well as around the front 
corridor. The right wing is called 
Haru-no-ma, or the Hall of Spring, 
and the left wing Aki-no-ma, or the 
Hall of Autumn. The furnishing of 
these rooms is typical in every de- 
tail of the seasons which they rep- 
resent, every piece of furniture, 
every comer of rooms, from the ta- 
bles and chairs to the window cur- 
tains, walls, ceilings, and even the 
floors, being decorated with the de- 
signs or patterns representing the 
seasons. 

The most ingenious productions 
of Japanese art, done upon the cost- 



liest fabrics, depicting Spring scenes 
and flowers, and the rare house dec- 
orating articles, including potteries, 
vases and folding screens with the 
pictures or emblems of the season, 
are conspicuous features seen in the 
Hall of Spring. The window cur- 
tains of this room are of figured 
silk crape, embroidered with cherry 
blossoms and shaded at their lower 
parts. The walls, ceilings and screen 
doors are covered with embroidered 
cut velvet on which are worked the 
scenes of the season, such as Mount 
Fuji as seen through the Spring 
mist, or pictures of spring flowers 
and birds. The tables and chairs are 
in keeping with the general scheme 
of design. The two open sides of 
the Hall are hung with graceful 
bamboo shades, also with the design 
in harmony with the season. 

Maples and chrysanthemums, 
which are the most pleasant sights 
prevalent in the Autumn of Japan, 
constitute the chief featufe that 
adorns the Hall of Autumn. On the 
walls, partition screens, and screen 
doors, are painted the crimson 
leaves of the maple and the gor- 
geous petals of the chrysanthemum 
and the Aki-gusa, or the Autumn 
plants. Nor does the decoration lack 
the moon, which is another Autumn 
sight in Japan. The curtains of this 
Hall are of rich Ro, or armour silk, 
worked with butterflies, an insect 
which attains great beauty during 
Autumn in Japan. The tables and 
chairs are of chrysanthemum pat- 



I30 



Japanese Exhibition, 



tern, and the floor is covered with 
matting decorated with scattered 
maple leaves. Bamboo shades with 
similar design hang on the two open 
sides of the hall. 



3. Sudziiki, 
ya— 

Doors. 
Windows. 



Toramatsu, Nago- 



4. Vanianaka & Co,, Osaka — 
A room with decorative furni- 
tures. 

The object of this exhibit, the 
Nikko Temple Room, is to display 
to the world the beauty and other 
advantages of Japanese architec- 
ture, especially of the Tokugawa 
architecture, which found its high- 
est expression in the temples of 
Nikko. The building is the result of 
years of studv, labor and much ex- 
pense. The far-famed Nikko tem- 
ples, as well as other noted temples 
of earlier creation, have furnished 
motives for it, and the parts copied 
have been reproduced, not only in 
their general style, but in every de- 
tail. The very materials are the 
same, though in many cases very 
difficult to produce at the present 
day. The workmanship is such as 
was formerlv done bv the most 
noted artists for great princes and 
dainiios, the founders of temples 
and builders of palaces. The furni- 
ture and other objects included in 
the exhibit are modern rendering of 
articles formerly made for the use 
of the imperial family and the great 
nobles. 



GROUP 38. 

O&fce and Household Furniture* 

(Palaces of Mamtfactgrcs and Varied 
Induttriet.) 

I. Araiy Taiji; Moko, Taihoku, 
Formosa — 

Tables. 
Bureau. 



2. Hashiguchi, Norio; Taichu, 

Formosa — 

Hat rack. 

3. Koiio, Takcjiro; Taichu, For- 

7fwsa — 

Round table. 

GROUP 41. 

Hordware, 
(Palace of Mantifacttires.) 

1. Mizoguchi, Yasunosuke, To- 

minokoji'dori, Kioto — 

Iron kettles. 

2. Morioka Iron Kettle Manu- 

facturers Association, Izvate- 
ken — 

Iron kettles. 

3. Ono Tadashi, Minamidennui- 

clio, Kyobashi-kn, Tokio — 

Automatic fire-proof door. 



4. Sano, Yasuke, 
Osaka — 

Iron kettles. 
Censers. 

Mantel ornament. 
Flower vases. 



Bakuro-cho, 



International Exposition, St. Louis^ 1904. 



131 



GROUP 45. 

Porceloins. 
(Palace of Varied Indoitrics.) 

1. Araki, Shinjiro, Minami-Ota- 

machi, Yokohama — 
Flower vases. 
Plates, 
Tea pots. 
Soup bowls. 

2. Awaji Seito Co,, Hiogo-ken — 
Flower vases. 

Plates. 
Tablets. 
Tea set. 
Finger bowls. 
Pitchers. 
Beer mugs. 
Biscuit boxes. 
Ash receivers. 
Pepper pot. 
Mustard pot. 
Milk pitchers. 
Flower basins. 
Bowls. 

3. Chinjukivan, Kagoshima- 

ken — 
Flower vases. 
Censers. 

Mantel ornaments. 
Pitcher. 

4. Fujio, Suyeji, Hiogo-ken — 
Bowls. 

Plates. 
Censers. 
Tea pots. 
Flower vases. 

5. Fukuda, Genjiro, Moto-machi, 

Kobe— 
Flower vases. 
Bolls. 



Ice cream plates. 
Ornamental bowls. 
Plates. 
Soup bowls. 
Tea service. 
Coffee service. 
Chocolate cups. 
Sugar bowl. 
Chocolate pots. 
Milk pitchers. 
Tea strainer. 
Finger bowls. 
Censers. 
Fruit plates. 



,M- ; 



^ua 



6. Fukushima-ken Futabagun 

Ohori Tokigyo Kumiai, Fu- 
kushima-ken — 

Tea pots. 
Pitchers. 
Flower basin. 
Beer mugs. 

7. Hamada, Rokuro, Kumamoto- 

ken — 

Flower vases. 
Cake bowl. 

8. Hayakazva, Kahei, Fukuoka- 

ken — 

Flower basins. 

Censer. 

Mantel ornaments. 

Plates. 



9. Hodota, Takichi, 
Yokohama — 

Plates. 

Bowls. 

Jars. 

Tablets. 

Flower basin. ' 



Sakai-cho, 



1 



132 



Japanese Exhibition, 



10. Hori, Tomonao, Miye-ken — 
Tea sets. 

Incense box. 
Mantel ornament. 
Coffee sets. 
Tobacco boxes. 
Water basins. 
Water bottle. 
Pots. 
Tea pots. 
Beer mugs. 
Ash receiver. 
Pitchers. 
Card receiver. 

11. Hyochiyen, Nagoya — 
Flower vases. 

Fancy jars. 
Flower bowls. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Censers. 

12. Idzumi, Hiojiro, Sannomiya, 

Kobe- 
Bowls. 

13. Ikeda, Seisuke, Shimmonsen, 

Kioto — 
Bowls. 
Tea service. 
Flower vases. 
Box. 

14. Ina, Hatsunojo, Aichi-ken — 
Flower pots. 

Flower vases. 
Tobacco cases. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Bowls. 
Stick stands. 
Ash receivers. 

15. Kamei, Centaro, Fukiioka- 

ken — 
Flower vases. 
Censer. 



16. Kasugai, Genjiro, Sumiyoshi" 

cho, Yokohama — 
Flower vases. 
Tablets. 
Covered dish. 

17. Kato, Kosaburo, Benten-dori, 

Yokohama — 
Tea sets. 

Ladies' toilet articles. 
Flower vases. 
Flower bowls. 
Tablets. 

Ornamental plates. 
Cups and saucers. 
Plates. 

18. Kato, Haruji, Aichi-ken — 
Flower vases. 

Censer. 
Coffee cups. 
Tobacco cases. 
Finger bowls. 
Flower dishes. 

19. Kato, Sakusuke, Aichi-ken — 
Flower vases. 

Milk pitchers. 
Bowls. 
Meat plates. 
Tea plates. 
Tea service. 
Bowls. 

Finger bowls. 
Chocolate pots. 

20. Kato, Yonetaro, Minami- 

Naka-dori, Yokohama — 
Coffee cups. 
Plates. 
Tablets. 
Tea caddies. 
Flower vases. 



i 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



133 



21. Kawakami, Fusaichi, Shima- 

neken — 
Flower vases. 

Covered dishes. 

Cake plates. 

Pitchers. 

Tea pots. 

Beer mugs. 

Milk pitchers. 

"Sake'' cups. 

Tea sets. 

Coffee plates. 

Plates. 

Ash receivers. 

22. Kawamoto, Yeijiro, Kiyomi- 

su, Kioto — 
Flower basins. 
Basin. ' 

23. Kawamura-gumi, Miye-ken — 
Flower vases. 

Censers. 

Mantel ornaments. 
Tea pots. 
Ash receivers. 
Tobacco cases. 
Match box. 
Cake vessels. 

24. Keita, Masataro, Kagoshima — 
Censers. 

Flower vases. 
Cake dishes. 
Ornamental bowl. 
Coffee cups. 

25. Kitnura, Katsuji, Shimoya- 

m<itC'dori, Kobe — 
Flower vases. 
Jars. 

Coffee cups. 
Covered dishes. 
Censer. 
Plate. 



26. Kinkozan, Sobei, Awada, Ki- 
oto — '■ 
Flower vases. 

Censers. 

Bowls. 

Plates. 

Jars. 

Covered dishes. 

Umbrella stands. 

Flower pots. 

2y. Kioto Tojiki Co., Shirakawa, 

Kioto — 
. Flower vases. 

28. Kishida, Tozaburo, Kita-Na- 

gasa-dori, Kobe — 
Flower vases. 
Plate. 
Bowl. 

29. Koyama, Tsunejiro, Azvaji- 

cho, Kanda-ku, Tokio — 
Flower vases. 
Mantel ornament. 

30. Kumamoto, Kinroku, Kagoshi- 

ma — 
Flower vases. 

Cake dish. 

Plate. 

Censers. 

Mantel ornaments. 

Coffee cups. 

31. Kusube, Sennosiike, San jo, 

Kioto — 
Flower basins. 

Fire boxes. 

Plates. 

Censers. 

32. Shofu, Kajio, Kioto — 
Tea sets. 

Chocolate set. 
Flower vases. 
Tobacco. 



134 



Japanese Exhibition, 



33 



. Matsuki, Bunkio, Kano-ntachi, 
Kobe— 

Flower vases. 
Milk pitchers. 
Flower pots. 
Tea pots. 

34. Matsunaga, Tokujiro, Hatago- 

cho, Kanda-ku, Tokio — 

Flower vases. 

35. Matsuo, Kwanso, Yamamoto- 

dori, Kobe — 

Flower vases. 

Jar. 

Punch bowls. 

Ornamental plates. 

Censer. 

Lanterns. 



36. Mazvatari, Shunro, 

cho, Kobe — 

Lantern. 

Flower vases. 

Bowl. 

Meat plates. 

Bread plates. 

Ice cream dishes. 

Ash plates. 

Plates. 

Tea sets. 

Milk bowls. 

Pots. 

Large dishes. 

Censers. 

Mantel ornaments. 

37. Mimura, Denjiro, 

ken — 

Jar with cover. 
Flower vases. 
Flower pot. 



Sakaye- 



Ibaraki- 



38. Miyagawa, Hannostike, Kana- 

gazva-ken — 

Flower vases. 

Ornamental plates. 

Basins. 

Bowls. 

Water reservoir. 

Mantel ornaments. 

39. Momoi Tatsuo, Motohatna- 

cho, Yokohama — 

Flower vase. 

40. Mori, Chosaburo, Fukuoka- 

ken — 
Flower vases. 
Plate. 

41. Nagaye, Tasaburo, Nunobiki- 

dori, Kobe — 

Censer. 

Plate. 

Bowl. 

Flower basins. 

Jar. 

Buttons. 

42. Nakabe Toranosuke, SannO" 

tniya, Kobe — 

Basins. 

Lantern. 

Umbrella stands. 

Flower pots. 

Lamp basket. 

Plate and coffee cups. 

Flower basins. 

Beer mugs. , 

Ash receivers. 

Pitchers. 

Tea pots. 

Flower vase. 

Cake dishes. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



13s 



43. Nakamura, Yeitaro, Minami- 

Sakuma-cho, Shiba-ku, To- 

kio — 
Ornamental plate. 
Plates. 
Censer. 
Towers. 
Ladies' buttons. 

44. Nihon Togwa Kyokai, Hon- 

cho, Yokohama — 
Tablets. 
Plates. 

Flower vases. 
Pitcher. 
Tea set. 
Coffee cups. 
Covered dishes. 
Bowls. 
Flower basins. 

45. Oda, Jinso, Ota-machi, Yoko- 

hama — 
Tea pots. 
Pitchers. 
Sugar bowls. 
Tea sets. 
Cups and saucers. 

46. Oguri, Uhei, Nagasaki-ken — 
Mantel ornament. 

Tea caddy. 

47. Okamoto, Rihei, Motomachi- 

dori, Kobe — 
Flower vases. 

48. Otstika, Chuji, Tochigi-ken — 
Pitchers. 

49. Sakamoto, Chujiro, Aivaza- 

Naka-dori, Osaka — 
Bowls. 
Censer. 
Plates. 
Flower vases. 



50. Sasaki, Rotaro, Yehime-ken — 
Mantel ornaments. 

Tablet. 

51. Seto Tojikisho Dogio-Kn- 

miai, Aichi-ken — 
Plant pots. 

52. Shibata, Matakichi, Kano- 

machi, Kobe — 
Tea sets. 
Ice cream dishes. 
Coffee sets. 
Bowls. 

53. Shibata, Matakichi, Hinode- 

cho, Yokohama — 
Tea sets. 
Ice cream sets. 
Berry sets. 
Cake dish. 
Tobacco box. 
Plates. 
Bowl. 
Tea pot. 

Toothpick boxes. 
Tea set. 
Coffee cups and coffee set. 

54. Shigaraki Porcelain Dealers* 

Association, Higo-ken — 
Cane holders. 
Plant pots. 
Tea bottle. 
Flower vases. 
Stool. 

Water basins. 
Pots. 

55. Shimada, Taro, Oivari-cho, 

Kyobashi'ku, Tokio — 
Picture frames. 
Flower vases. 
Lanterns. 



136 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Mantel ornaments. 
Plant pots. 
Ash dishes. 
Tea sets. 
Dinner sets. 

56. Shimamura, Shin go, Terama- 

chi-dori, Kioto — 
Tea sets. 
Chocolate sets. 
Berry set. 
Fish dishes. 
Plates. 
Ice bowls. 
Cake vessels. 
Pitchers. 
Flower basins. 
Censers. 
Flower pots. 

57. Shimicu, Moriye, Aichiken — 
Bowls. 

Flower vases. 
Ornamental plate. 
Flower pots. 
Mantel ornament. 

58. Shimizu, Yaso, Motomachi- 

dori, Kobe — 
Dinner set. 
Biscuit bowls. 
Chocolate pots. 
Cups and saucers. 
Tea sets. 
Flower vases. 



59. Stiya, Kuheiy 
Kobe — 
Flower vases. 
Tooth brush stand. 
Mantel ornament. 
Bowl. 
Censers. 
Plates. 



Sannomiya, 



Flower pots. 
Ash receivers. 
Toilet set. 

60. Suzuki, Kichigoro, Motoma- 

chi, Kobe — 
Frame. 
Flower vase. 
Tea sets. 
Bread plate. 

61. Stisuki, Kichigoro, Yokoyama- 

cho, Nihonbashi'ku, Tokio — 
Flower vases. 
Card plates. 
Flower pots. 
Tablets. 
Flower basins. 

Tea set. 

• 

62. Sudsuki, Kinyemon, Kita-Na- 

gasa-dori, Kobe — 
Flower vases. 
Cups and saucers. 

64. Tateishi, Jiyemon, Motomachi, 

Kobe— 
Flower basins. 
Jars. 
Mantel ornament. 

65. Takahashi, Dohachi, Kiyomi- 

zu, Kioto — 
Flower vase. 
Censers. 
Ink stands. 

66. Takashima, Yunosuke, Koma- 

gata-cho, Asakusa-ku, To- 
kio — 

Flower vases. 

Censers. 

Cup. 

Incense box. 

Bowl. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



137 



67. Takatori, Kaichi, Fukuoka- 

ken — 
Flower vases. 

Censer. 

Mantel ornament. 

Ash receivers. 

Plates. 

68. Takehe, Jiinzo, Nakayamate- 

dori, Kobe — 
Flower vases. 
Coffee cups. 

69. Takemura, Yusaburo, Onotsu- 

ye-dori, Kobe — 
Gas stands. 
Flower vases. 
Basins. 

Umbrella stands. 
Tea pots. 
Watch holders. 

70. Tanaka, Tomosaburo, Ibaraki- 

ken — 
Vase with cover. 
Flower vases. 
Flower pots. 

71. Taniguchi, Yojiuro, Motoma- 

chi, Kobe — 
Flower vases. 
Tea set. 

Mantel ornament. 
Salt cellars. 
Plates. 

Covered dishes. 
Censers. 

Tooth brush stand. 
Egg cups. 
Bowls. 
Flower pots. 
Fruit dishes. 
Ice cream set. 
Chocolate dish. 
Beer mugs. 



72. Tanto, Kabushiki Kwaisha, 

Awasa-shimo'dori, Osaka — 

Milk pitchers. 
Flower pots. 
Toilet basins. 
Flower basins. 
Tea sets. . 
Coffee cups. 
Beer mugs. 

73. Tashiro, Seiyemon, Fukushi- 

maken — 

Flower vases. 
Tobacco bottle. 
Ash pan. 
Small flower vases. 

74. Toda, Saitaro, Hiogo-ken — 

Censer. 
Flower vases. 
Pitcher. 

75. Togo, Jusho, Kagoshima- 

ken — 

Flower vases. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Censers. 
Insect cages. 
Plates. 

76. Tomimura, Tomiichi, Kitana- 

gasa-dori, Kobe — 

Flower pots. 

Bowls. 

Flower basins. 

Cups and saucers. 

Chocolate cups and saucers. 

Milk pitchers. 

Sugar bowl. 

Tea pots. 

Umbrella stands. 

Mantel ornaments. 



138 



Japanese Exhibition, 



jy. Tsuji, Osaka Branch Store, 
UtsubO'Uye-dori, Osaka — 
Coffee set. 
Beer mugs. 
Tablet. 
Flower vases. 
Fire box. 
Cigarette case. 
Ash receivers. 

78. Watano, Kichiji, Hdncho, Yo- 

kohama — 
Tablet. 

Flower vases. 
Mantel ornament. 
Flower basins. 
Tea set. 
Cake plates. 
Meat plates. 

Coffee cups and saucers. 
Tea cups and saucers. 
Censers. 
Bowls. 

Covered dishes. 
Flower pot. 

79. Watatani, Heibei, Honcho, 

Yokohama — 
Pitcher. 

Mantel ornaments. 
Censer and flower basin. 
Flower basins. 
Bowls. 
Coffee pots. 
Cups and saucers. 
Tea set. 
Chocolate set. 

80. Yabu, Meizan, Dojima, Osa- 

ka — 

Ornamental plates. 
Tea cups. 
Jars. 



Flower vases. 
Incense box. 
Boxes. 
Bowl. 
Tea pots. 
Tea caddies. 
Censers. 
Cup. 
Pitcher. 

81. Yagi, Yeikichi, (Representa- 

tive of Tokoname Trading 

Co.), Aichi-ken — 
Flower vases. 
Flower pots. 
Bowls. 

Umbrella stands. 
Ash receivers. 
Flower basins. 
Tobacco boxes. 
Tea pots. 

82. Yamanaka & Co,, Kitahama, 

Osaka — 
Dining utensils. 
Utensils. 
Flower basin. 
Coft'ee cups, 
l^mps. 

83. Yamashita, Toyoso, Aichi- 

kcn — 
Flower vases. 
Cups. 

Mantel ornaments. 
Beer mugs. 
Coffee cups. 
Pitchers. 

84. Yasuda, Fukiizo, Matsuwara, 

Kioto — 
Flower basins. 
Basins with stand. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



139 



Bowl. 
Plate. 
Censers. 
Tea pots. 

Eorthenwore. 
(Palace of Varied Indostries.) 

T. Aidcu, Tojiki, Dogyo, Ku- 
miai, Fukushima-ken — 
Covered dishes. 
Jar. 

Tea pots. 
Coffee pot. 
Pitcher. 
Sugar jar. 
Tea set. 

2. Aoki, Jinichiro, Saga-ken — 
Bowls. 

Large bowls. 
Umbrella stands. 
Flower basins. 
Plates. 

Covered dishes. 
Salad dishes. 

3. Aoki, Tatsiishiro, Gifu-ken — 
Coffee cups. 

Cups. 

Plates. 

*'Sake" cups. 

Rice bowls. 

Tea pots. 

Finger bowls. 

Flower vases. 

Milk pitcher with sugar bowl. 

Bowls. 

Tea cups. 

Inkstands. 

Mantel ornaments. 

Cake dishes. 

Trays. 

Soup plates. 



4. Fukunaga, Chuji, Saga-ken — 
Flower cases. 
Jars. 
Bowls. 
Tea set. 
Plates. 

Covered dish. 
Coffee cups. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Dining utensils. 
Finger bowls. 
Censers. 

5. Higashi-Sonoki-gun Kamiha- 

samimiira Tojikigyo Ku- 
muai, Nagasaki-ken — 

Ring rack. 

Censers. 

Flower vases. 

Cake plates. 

Card plates. 

Bowl. 

6. Higashi-sonokigun Oriosemu- 

ra Mikawauchi Toji-goshi- 
kaisha, Nagasaki-ken — 

Flower vases. 

Plates. 

Tea sets. 

Censers. 

Coffee cups. 

Bowls. 

Pitchers. 

Mantel ornaments. 

7. Higashi-Sonohi-gun Oriose- 
mura Tojikigyo Kumiai, Na- 
gasaki-ken — 

Flower vases. 

Censers. 

Bowls. 

Ornamental bowls. 

Plates. 



I40 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Soup plates. 
Coffee cups. 
Inkstands. 
Ash receivers. 
Toilet dish. 
Sugar dish. 
Milk pitcher. 
Butter dish. 
Coffee cups. 
Egg cups. 

8. Higuchi, Haruzane, Saga- 

ken — 
Cups. 
Coffee set. 
Japanese tea set. 

9. Higashi-Sonoki-gun Oriose- 

mura Yenaga Tojikigyo Ku- 
miai, Nagasaki-ken — 

Toilet utensils. 

Beer mugs. 

Flower vases. 

Plates. 

Goblets. 

Bowls. 

Pitcher. 

Dishes. p 

Mantel ornaments. 

Soup plates and chocolate pots. 

10. Hiraoka, Riltei, Gojo, Kioto — 
Flower vases. 

Pitchers. 
Wine cups. 
Censer. 

Cigarette case. 
Plates. 

11. Hiyekiba, Tokijigyo, Kumiai, 

Nagasaki — 
Flower vases. 
Covered bowl. 
Sugar pot. 



Sakai'cho, 



Goblets. 
Meat bowls. 
Cake bowls. 
Basin. 
Beer mugs. 
Bowl. 
Cups. 

Flower pots. 
Coffee cups. 
Plates. 

12. Hodota, Takichi, 

Yokohama — 
Flower vases. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Censers. 
Bowls. 
Pitchers. 
Plates. 
Jars. 
Tea set. 
Coffee cups. 
Covered dishes. 

13. Horikazva, Kazan, Kaya-cho, 

Shitaya-ku, Tokio — 
Flower vases. 
Plates. 

Tooth-pick cases. 
Ash receivers. 
Incense boxes. 
Censers. 
Fire boxes. 

14. Hyochiykcn, Nagoya — 
Tablets. 

Flower vases. 
F'lower bowls. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Fancy jars. 

15. Icliihashi, Tobei, Ibaraki-ken — 
Flower vases. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



141 



16. Imura, Hikojiro, Honcho, Yo- 

kohama — 
Flower vases. 
Tablets. 
Tea sets. 
Coffee cups. 
Tea pots. 

17. Itwuye, Gotaro, Kiyomisu, 

Kioto — 
Flower vases. 
Censer. 
Tar. 

Covered vessels. 
Dishes. 
Cake plate. 
Plates. 
Coffee cups. 
Coffee set. 
Basin. . 
Toilet basin. 

18. Inouye, Ryosai, Hashiba-cho, 

Asakusa, Tokio — 
Flower vases. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Ornamental plates. 
Basins. 
Bowls. 
Flower pots. 
Tea caddies. 

19. Joshima, Iwataro, Saga-ken — 
Bowls. 

Ice cream dishes. 
Plates. 

20. Kanazazva Tojikigyo Dantai, 

Kanasawa — 
Coffee cups and saucers. 
Ice cream sets. 
Cake plates. 
Umbrella stands. 



Flower bowls. 

Bread plates. 

Plates. 

Flower vases. 

Jars. 

Trays. 

Ek)wls. 

Censers. 

Tooth brush stands. 

Tea set. 

Salt cellars. 

Mantel ornaments. 

Beer mugs. 

Tobacco boxes. 

Ornamental plates. 

Basins. 

Covered dishes. 

Bells. 

Cake plates. 

Incense jars. 

Lamp stands. 

Flower pots. 

Tablets. 

Card plates. 

Ash receivers. 

Ornamental hanging piece. 

a 

21. Kato, Gosnke, Aichi-ken — 
Bowls. 

Pitchers. 
Flower vases. 
Tea set. 

22. Kato, Hanju, Aichi-ken — 

Flower vases. 
Tea caddy. 
Cake dish. 

23. Kato, Monyemon, Aichi-ken- 

Flower vases. 

Tea caddy. 

Figure of dog, ornament. 



1 



142 



Japanese Exhibition, 



24. Kato, Sukesaburo, Gifu-ken — 
Flower vases. 

CoflFee cups. 
Plates. 
Card plates. 
Bread plates. 
Butter dishes. 
Beer mugs. 
Pen stands. 
Inkstands. 
Needle boxes. 
Tea pots. 
Tea set. 

25. Kato, Sakutaro, Aichi-kcn — 

Tea set. 
Travs. 
Plates. 

Flower vases. 
Tablets. 

26. Kato, Tomojiro, Owari-cho, 

Kyobashi-ku, Tokio — 

Flower vases. 

27. Kato, Zcnjiro, Aichi-ken — 

Flower vases. 
Tablet. 
Cake dishes. 

28. ' Kazvamoto, Hideo, Ginsa, 

Kyobashi-ku, Tokio — 

Tablets. 

Mantel ornaments. 

Flower vases. 

Plates. 

Flower pots. 

Rasin. 

Tea cups. 

Card bowls. 

Tea sets. 

Tea cups and saucers. 



29. Kawamoto, Kengo, Honcho, 

Yokohama — 
Tablets. 

Tea service set. 

CoflFee sets. 

Flower basins. 

Tea caddy. 

Fancy jar. 

30. Kawatomo, Masukichi, Aichi- 

ken — 
Flower pots. 

Bowls. 

Umbrella stands. 

Flower vases. 

Lamp stands. 

Censers. 

Fancy jars. 

Pavings tiles. 

31. Kihara Togogio Kumiai, Na- 

gasaki — 
Tea set. 
Beer mugs. 
Tea pots. 
Bowls. 

Flower vases. 
Cigar cases. 
Pitchers. 
Cake dishes. 

^2. Kishita, Tosaburo, Kitana- 
gasa-dori, Kobe — 
Tea sets. 

33. Kobayashi, Kichijiro, Shinsai- 
bashi-suji, Osaka — 
Flower basins. 
Jars. 
Plates. 
Bowls. 
Censer. 
Cups. 
Tea pot. 
Goldfish basin. 



I 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



143 



34. Kojima, Kiimasaburo, Hashi- 

ha-cho, Asakusa-ku, Tokio — 
Flower vases. 
Plates. 
Bowls. 

35. Koran Gomeikaisha, Saga- 

ken — 
Flower basins. 
Flower vases. 
Dining utensils. 
Tea set. 
Chocolate pot. 
Berrv set. 
Salad set. 
Milk pitcher. 
Plates. 
Cake plates. 
Bread plates. 
Punch bowls. 
Censers, 
^lantel ornaments. 

^6. Matsiimoto, Masajiro, Saga- 
ken — 
Plates. 
Bowls. 

Ice cream nappies. 
Nappies. 
Finger bowls. 

37. Matsumoio, Sataro, Sarugaku- 
cho, Kanda-kUj Tokio — 
Flower vases. 
Tea set. 
Plates. 

Mantel ornaments. 
Censer. 
Bowls. 
Tumblers. 
Jars. 



38. MatsHo, Kwanzo, Yaniamoto- 

dori, Kobe — 
Censer. 

39. Midznno, Ichinosuke, Na- 

goya— 
Tea sets. 
Flower vases. 
Cake vessels. 
Dining utensils. 
Candle holders. 
Tablets. 

40. M ikawatichi, Tojiki, Goshi 

Kzuaisha, Nagasaki-ken — 
Flower vases. 
Tea sets. 
Plates. 
Pitcher. 
Censers. 
Coffee sets. 
Bowls. 
Mantel ornaments. 

41. Miura, Chiknsen, Kiyomisu, 

Kioto — 
Flower vases. 
Pitchers. 
Bowls. 
Censers. 
Tea sets and "sake" cups. 

42. Afiyagawa, Kozan, Minami- 

Ota-wachi, Yokohama — 
Flower vases. 
Censers. 
Fancy jars. 
Ornamental plates. 
Tea pots. 
Pitchers. 
Plates. 

Coffee cups and saucers. 
Basins. 
Bowls. 



144 



Japanese Exhibition, 



43. Mtikai, Wahei, Yehime-ken — 
Flower vases. 

Basins. 

Coffee set. 

Tea set. 

Censer. 

Mantel ornaments. 

Plates. 

Cups. 

44. Murakami, Masajiro, Shimo- 

yamate-dori, Kobe — 
Flower vases. 
Plates. 
Censers. 

Mantel ornaments. 
Tea sets. 

45. Nagata, Sojuro, Nagoya — 
Tea sets. 

Dining utensils. 
Flower vases. 

46. Nagakawa, Noboru, Asakusa- 

Parky Tokio — 
Flower vases. 
Coffee cups and plates. 

47. Nakamura, Kameichi, Asa- 

kusa Park, Tokio — 
Flower vases. 

48. Naruse, Seishi, Gifu-ken — 
Flower vases. 

Mantel ornaments. 

Tablet. 

Plates. 

Beer mugs. 

Tea cups. 

Censer. 

49. Nishiura, Yenji, Gifu-ken — 
Flower vases. 

Fancy jars. 



Coffee cups. 
Tea cups. 
Cake bowls. 
Bowls. 
Censers. 
Covered dishes. 
Tea pots. 

Ornamental plates. 
Flower bowls. 

50. Nomigun Kutani Toki Exhi- 
bitors' Association, Ishikawa- 

ken — 
Flower basins. 
Flower dishes. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Plates. 

Coffee cups and saucers. 
Tea sets. 
Wine bottles. 
Bowls. 
Jars. 

Round plates. 
Basins. 
Censers. 

Ornamental plates. 
Flower basins and censers in set. 
Bells. 

Toilet utensils. 
Bottles. 
Beer mugs. 
Covered dishes. 
Tooth brush stands. 
Cake bowls. 
Cups and saucers. 
Tea pots. 
Tea set. 
Cups. 
Egg cups. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



145 



51. Okamoto, Tominosuke, Abur- 

anokoji, Kioto — 
Hower vases. 
Pitchers. 
Fire box. 
Jars. 
Censers. 
Bowls. 
Mantel ornaments. 

52. Saga-ken Nishimatsura-gun 

Tojiki Dogyo Kumiai, Saga- 
ken — 

Bowls. 

Plates. 

Covered dish. 

Flower basins. 

Dining utensils. 

Dolls. 

Jars. 

Coffee cups. 

Umbrella stands. 

Cake bowls. 

Lanterns. 

Flower vases. 

Soup bowls. 

Punch bowls. 

Finger bowls. 

Flower pots. 



53. Sakamoto, Gengo, 
ken — 
Flower pots. 
Flower vases. 
Jars. 
Basins. 
Coffee sets. 
Tea sets. 
Beer mugs. 
Covered dishes. 
Plates. 
Bowls. 
Mantel ornaments. 



Yehime- 



54. Shibata, Zenyemon, Aichi- 

ken — 
Flower vases. 

« 

Card holders. 
Ash receivers. 
Cigarette plates. 
Plates. 
Censers. 
Flower pots. 
Bowls. 

55. Shiba, Torao, Hiogo-ken — 
Flower vases. 

Mantel ornament. 

56. Shtmada, Taro, Owari-cho, 

Kyobashi-ku, Tokio — 
Flower vases. 

57. Shimidsu, Rokunosuke, Na- 

goya— 
Flower vases. 
Tea caddies. 
Censers. 
Tea sets. 
Plates. 
Tablets. 

58. Shimidsu, Sekison, Gifu- 

ken — 
Flower vases. 
Covered dishes. 
Tablet. 
Censers. 

59. Shimohasamiura Hikiba Toji- 

kigio Kumiai, Nagasaki- 
ken — 

Ash pan. 

Censers. 

Pitcher. 

Flower vases. 

Cup. 

Cake plate. 



146 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Name card receiver. 

Bowl. 

Ring holder. 

60. Suzuki, Masunosuke, Benten- 

dori, Yokohama — 
Tablets. 

61. Tajimi Trading Co., Gifu- 

ken — 
Coffee cups. 
Plates. 

Milk pitchers. 
Pen plates. 
Pepper pots. 
Butter dish. 
Tooth brush stands. 
Covered dish. 
Tea caddy. 
Chocolate pots. 
Chocolate cups. 
Tea pots. 
Switch cases. 
Bowls. 

Mustard pots. 
Egg cups. 
Flower vases. 
Tobacco boxes. 
Ash receiver. 
Dish. 
Pan. 
Censer. 

Smoking utensil. 
Umbrella stands. 
Flower basins. 
Tea pots. 
Fire boxes. 
Covered dish. 

62. Takahashi, Dohachi, Kiyomi- 
su, Kioto — • 

Flower vases. 
Censer. 



Bowls. 
Flower pot. 
Mantel ornament. 

63. Takahashi, Tsurukichi, Ye- 

hime-ken — 
Flower vases. 
Tea sets. 
■ Censer. 
Tobacco box. 
Cup. 
Pitcher. 

Dining utensils. 
Water reservoir. 
Toilet basin. 

64. Takemoto, Koichi, Takata, 

Tokio — 
Flower vases. 

65. Takito & Co., Nagoya — 
Earthen wares. 

66. Takito, Manjiro, Nagoya — 
Earthen wares. 

67. Taniguchi, Chojiro, Kiyo- 

mizu, Kioto — 
Flower vases. 
Jars. 

68. Taniguchi, Kichijiro, Saruga- 

ku-cho, Kanda-ku, Tokio — 
Flower vases. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Coffee set. 
Censers. 
Plates. 
Bowls. 

Toothpick holders. 
Coffee cups. 
Jars. 
"Sake" cups. 



International Exposition^ St. Louis, 1904. 



147 



69. Tashiro, Ichiroji, 

dori, Yokohama — 

Dining utensils. 
Tea sets. 
Punch bowls. 
Flower basins. 
Umbrella stands. 
Ornamental plate. 
Chocolate sets. 
Bowls. 
Plates. 

Japanese tea sets. 
Ice cream nappies. 

70. Tashiro, Seijiyemon, 

shima-ken — 

Flower vases. 
Cigarette vases. 

71. Tareishi, Jiyemon, 

machi, Kobe — 

Flower basins. 
Jars. 
Bowls. 
Plates. 

72. Terabayashi, Katei, 

Kioto — 

Tea sets. 
Beer mugs. 
Kettle. 

Flower basins. 
Plate and tea caddy. 

73. Terazaiva, Tomejiro, 

ken — 

Coffee cups. 
Plates. 

Flower vases. 
Ice cream plates. 
Tea sets. 
Bowls. 



Benten- 



Fuku- 



Moto- 



Gojo, 



Aichi" 



74. Tominaga, Genroku, Saga- 

ken — 
Flower vases. 
Cake vessels. 
Plates. 
Bowls. 
Soup dishes. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Toilet stands. 

75. Tominaga, Yasuji, Utsubo- 

Kami'dori, Osaka — 
Flower vases. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Tea sets. 
' Cups. 
Plates. 
Bowls. 

76. Tomoda, Yasukiyo, Hiogo- 

ken — 
Flower vases. 
Ornamental plates. 
Flower bowl. 
Coffee cups. 

77 . Tsuchikawa, Sozaemon, Gifu- 

ken — 
Flower vases. 
Covered dishes. 
Sugar bowls. 
Plates. 
Bowls. 

78. Tsuji & Co,, Saga-ken — 
Flower vases. 

Bowls. 

Covered dishes. 
Mantel ornaments. 
Censers. 
Tea sets. 
Tobacco boxes. 
Ice cream sets. 
Plates. 



148 



Japanese Exhibition, 



79. Tsuji Osaka Branch OfUce, 

Utsubo-Katni-dori, Osaka — 
Flower basins. 
Flower pots. 

80. Uno, Nimatsu, Gojo, Kioto — 
Beer mugs. 

Flower vases. 
Candle holder. 
Bowls. 
Tea cups. 
Flower basins. 
Ash receivers. 
Basins. 

Covered dishes. 
Coffee cups. 
*Tea pots. 
Plates. 

Tobacco cases. 
Toilet set. 
Lamp stand. 
Fire boxes. 
Milk pitchers. 
Umbrella stands. 
Jars. 

Flower plates. 
Fruit plate. 
Mantel ornament. 

81. IVatanabe, Kihachiro, Tsu- 

kiji, Kyobashi-kti, Tokio — 
Flower vases. 
Tablets. 
Coffee cups. 
Plates. 
Bowl. 

Mantel ornaments. 
Tea sets. 
Coft'ee sets. 
Censer. 



82. Yamamoto, Jusaku, Saga- 

ken — 
Flower basins. 
Jars. 
Bowls. 

Basins with stand. 
Flower pots. 
Umbrella stands. 

83. Vamanaka Co., Kitahama, 

Osaka — 
Dining utensils. 

84. Yenuma-gun Kutani Toki 

Exhibitors' Association, Ish- 

ikawa-ken — 
Flower basins. 
Bowls. 

Candle holders. 
Plates. 
Jars. 

Covered dishes. 
Censers. 
Tablets. 
Basins. 

85. Yukitake, Toyokichi, Saga- 

ken — 
Flower basins. 

GROUP 47. 
Glass and Crystal* 

(Palace of Manufacttsret.) 

I. Shimada, Magoichi, Tenjin- 

bashi-suji, Osaka — 
Window glass. 

GROUP 48. 

Apparotus for Heotins:* 
(Palace of Varied Industries.) 

1. Onishi, Yo, Gifu-ken — 
Stove screens. 

2. Teshigawara Goshi Kwaisha, 

Gifu'ken — 
Stove screens. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



149 



GROUP 49* 

Li8:htms: Apparottss« 
(Palace of Manufactures*) 

1. Aida, Takijiro, Awomono- 

cho, Nihonbashi'ku, To- 
kyo — 
Lanterns. 

2. Goto, Yonetaro, Gifxi-ken — 
"Gifu" fancy lanterns. 

3. Idzumi, Zenshichi, Gifu-ken — 
"Gifu" fancy lanterns. 

4. Komatsu, Isuke, Genzo-machi, 

Osaka — 
Lanterns. 

5. Matauki, Bunkio, Kano- 

machi, Kobe — 
Lamp shade and lamp. 

6. Miyata, Totaro, Bentcn-dori, 

Yokohama — 
Lamp shade and lamp. 

7. Nakai & Co., Sannomiya, 

Kobe— 
Lamp shades. 

8. Nakamura, Genzo, Nagoya — 
I^mp shades. 

9. Ozeiki, Jishichi, Gifn-ken — 
"Gifu*' fancy lanterns. 

10. Suzuki, Toratnatsu, Na- 

goya— 
Lanterns. 

11. Takei, Sukeyemon, Rep- 

resentative of Takei Paper 
Co., Gifn-ken — 
Fancy lanterns. 

12. Tanaka, Seikichi, Tokyo — 
Fancy lanterns. 



13. Teshigazvara, Goshi, Kwai- 

sha, Gifu-ken — 
"Gifu" fancy lanterns. 
Lamp shades. 

14. Yamanaka & Co., Kitahama, 

Osaka — 
Lamps. 

GROUP 5L 

Equipment for the Mantif acture of 
Textile Fabrics* 

(Palace of Manufactures.) 

I. Meiko Sha, Kawara-cho, 

Asakusa-ku, Tokyo — 
Heddles. 

GROUP 5Z 

Equipment used in Bleachmgf Dyc- 

insft Printins: ond Finishins: 

Textiles* 

(Palace of Manufactures.) 

1. Higuchi, Bunsuke, Kaman- 

oza-dori, Kyoto — 
Gold threads. 

2. Kanazawa Dyed Stuff Ex- 

hibitors' Association, Kana- 

zazca — 
Screen. 
Table cloth. 
"Gaku." 
Hanging. 
Pillow cases. 
Stove screen. 
Bed spread. 
Folding screen. 
Fans. 
Pillow. 
Tapestry. 
Tapestry, painted. 
Hanging, painted. 



ISO 



Japanese Exhibition, 



'*Gaku" of painted fabric. 
**Kakemono" of painted fabric. 
Screen of painted fabric. 
Folding screen of painted fabric. 
Pillow case, painted. 

GROUP 54* 

Threads and Fofarics of G>ttocu 
(PaUce of Mantrfachargt,) 

1. Anahara, Masakichi, Tochigi- 

ken — 
Cotton crape. 

2. Aoki, Seiso, Tochigi-ken — 
Cotton crape. 

3. Asada, Tokuhei, Osaka-fu — 
Cotton yam. 

4. Chikusa, Yasubei, Osaka — 
Cotton crape, dyed. 

5. Cotton Crape Manufacturers' 

Association, Yamaguchi- 
ken — 
"Iwakuni" cotton crape. 

6. Daito, Kamekichi, the Repre- 

sentative of Otani Fabric 
Factory, Shiga-ken — 

Figured gauze crape. 

Gauze crape. 

Striped gauze crape. 

White cotton crape. 

Striped cotton crape. 

Cotton crape. 

7. Fujiki, Kaichiro, Kodenma- 

cho, Nihonbashi-ku, Tokio — 
Cotton crape. 

8. Fukui, Sahei, Tokushima- 

ken — 
Imitation flannel. 

9. Haniu, Chokichi, Tochigi- 

ken — 
Cotton crape. 



10. Hibino & Co,, Nagoya — 
Cotton fabric, printed. 

11. Horikawa, Shinzaburo, Shira- 

kawa-suji, Sanjo, Kyoto — 
Dyed imitation flannel. 
E)yed calico. 
Dyed muslin. 

12. Ichida, Yeijiro, Representative 

of Murai Cotton Threads 
Factory, Osaka-fu — 
Cotton threads. 

13. Hirooka, Isuke, Hasegawa- 

cho, Nihonbashi'ku, To- 
kio — 
Cotton crape. 

14. Idznmo Cotton Crape Manu- 

facturers' Association, Tot- 
tori-ken — 

"Idzumo'* cotton crape. 

"Idzumo" cotton crape, gased. 

15. Inaoka & Co,, Hyogo-ken — 
Towels. 

16. Inouye, Tsunejiro, Asnchi- 

machi, Osaka — 
Cotton threads. 
Net cord. 

17. Inouye, Yoshibei, Kyoto — 
"Yuzen" painted cotton fabric. 

18. Ishii, Katsujiro, Temtnabashi- 

suji, Osaka — 
Towels. 

19. Ishikazva, Seiyemon, Benten- 

dori, Yokohama — 
Cotton crape. 

20. Ishikawa, Sadakichi, Tochigi- 

ken — 
Cotton crape. 

21. I to, Chiubei, Hon-machi, 

Osaka — 
Cotton crape. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



151 



22. luchi, Kamejiro, Tokushitna- 

ken — 
Cotton imitation flannel. 

23. Iwaita, Genzo, Tochigi-ken — 
Cotton crape. 

24. Izvashita, Zenshichiro, Tochi- 

gi-ken — 
Cotton crape. 

25. lyo Imitation Flannel Manu- 

facturers* Association, Ye- 
hime-ken — 
"lyo" imitation flannel. 

26. Kawashima, Keijiro, Minami- 

Kinhoji-machi, Osaka — 
Towels. 

2^. Kazi'ashima, Kiubei, Tochigi- 
ken — 
Cotton crape. 

28. Kishu Imitation Flannel Man- 

ufacturers' Association, Wa- 
kayama-ken — 
Imitation flannel. 

29. Mikawa, Teijiro, Tokushima- 

ken — 
''Kokura" cotton fabric. 

30. Mima, Giichiro, Tokushima- 

ken — 
Imitation flannel. 

31. Motojima, Zensaku, Tochigi- 

ken — 
Cotton crape. 

32. Nihon, Katazome, Kwaisha, 

Shidzuoka-ken — 
Cotton crape, printed. 
Cotton fabric, printed. 

33. Nishimura, Kinjiro, Yedo- 

horiminami-dori, Osaka — 

• Cotton crape, striped. 

, Mixed cotton and silk fabric, fig- 
ured. 



"Moji ori" fabric. 
Towels. 

34. Imitation Flannel Manufac- 

turing Co,, Wakayama-ken — 
Imitation flannel. 

35. Nomura, Rihei, Honmachi, 

Osaka — 
Cotton crape. 

36. Osaka Kitakaivachi-gun Fab- 

ric Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion, Osaka-fu — 

Towels. 

Cotton crape. 

37. Saito, Jtuzo, Tochigi-ken — 
Cotton crape. 

38. Sakurai, Shinroku, Tochigi- 

ken — 
Cotton crape, printed. 

39. Sano Fabric Manufacturers' 

Association, Tochigi-ken — 
Cotton crape. 

40. Sekiguchi, Tetsujiro, Saruye- 

cho, Fukagawa-ku, Tokyo — 
Cotton fabric, printed. 

41. Shinkawa Fabric Manufacture 

Co., Toyama-ken — 
Cotton crape, gased. 
Cotton fabric. 

42. Sudo, Nihei, Tochigi-ken — 
Cotton crape. 

43. Takaishi, Sosuke, Tokushima- 

ken — 
Cotton fabric. 

44. Takashima Cotton Crape and 

Imitation Flannel Manufac- 
turers' Association, Shiga- 
ken — 
"Takashima" cotton crape. 



152 



Japanese Exhibition, 



45. Tani, Otoshiro, Bcnten-dori, 

Yokohama — 
Cotton fabric, gased. 
Cotton crape, gased. 
Cotton fabric. 
Cotton crape, painted. 

46. Tokushima Fabric Manufac- 

ture Co,, Tokushima-ken — 
Imitation flannel. 

47. Tokushima Seikisha, Toku- 

shima-ken — 
"Kokura" cotton fabric. 

48. Tonobori, Voshibei, Kyogai- 

machi-dori, Kyoto — 
Cotton fabric curtains. 

49. Tsuji, Toyohei, Tochigi-ken — 
Cotton fabric, figured. 

50. Umibe, Tashiro, Tokushima- 

ken — 
Cotton fabric. 

51. Uyeno, Shinyemon, Shiga- 

ken — 
'"Takashima" cotton crape. 

52. Yagi, Fukumatsu, Tosabori- 

Uramachi, Osaka — 
Towels. 

53. Yamazaki, Washichi, Yamano- 

shiku-machi, Asakusa-ku, 
Tokyo — 
Cotton fabric, painted. 

54. ]'asHda, Gcnzo, Tochigi-ken — 
Cotton crape. 

GROUP 55* 

Threads and Fobrics of Vcectafale 
Fibers other thon Cotton* 

(Palace of Mantifactures*) 
I. Asahi Co., Nijo Kazvaramachi, 

Kyoto — 
Table cloth. 
Doilies. 



Napkins. 

Handkerchiefs. 

Pillow-case. 

Collars. 

Centerpiece. 

Sideboard cover. 

2. Formosan Government, Tai- 

hoku, Formosa-^ 
Chinese grass fabric. 
Chinese grass fiber. 

3. Hisajima, BunJiachi, Naga- 

saki-ken — 
Handkerchiefs. 

4. Hokkaido Flax Company, 

Hokkaido — 
Sail cloths, various kinds. 
Canvas. 
Linen. 

Bleached flax fabric. 
Unbleached flax fabric. 

5. Izvata, Toyo, Yokohama — 
Handkerchiefs. 

6. Kara Hemp Fabric Exhibitors'' 

Association, Nara-ken — 
Handkerchiefs. 

7. Omi Hemp Manufacturers'' 

Association, Shiga-ken — 
Staft* for foreign dress. 

8. Shibata, Matakichi, Yoko- 

hama — 
Handkerchiefs. 
Shawls. 

9. Shidzuoka-ken "Kusu' Fabric 

Exhibitors' Association . 

Sh idzuo ka-k en — 
Fabric of fiber of "Kuzu.'' 

10. Takemura, Ito, Yokohama — 
Handkerchiefs. 
Collars and cuflFs. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



153 



GROUP 56^ 
Yam and Fabrics of Animal Fibers* 

(Palace of Manisfacttsres.) 

1. Horikawa, Shinzaburo, Shira- 

kawa-snji, San jo, Kioto — 
Painted muslin. 
Painted muslin table cloth. 
Curtain. 

2. Kyoto Dyers' Assocmtion, Ka- 

meya-cho, Kyoto — 
Muslin, painted. 

3. Ogihara, Kunizo, Tokyo-fu — '• 
Muslin, painted. 

4. Osaka Muslin "Yuzen*' Paint- 

ers' Association, Nakanoshi- 
ma, Osaka — 
Muslin, painted. 

5. Tanioka, Kintaro, Tokyo-fu — 
Muslin, painted. 

GROUP 57. 

Silk and Fabrics of Silk« 
(Palace of Mantifacttsres.) 

1. Aikazva, Denichiro, Yamana- 

shi'ken — 
"Kaiki'' silk. 

2. Akamatsu, Uhei, Yehime- 

ken — 
Raw silk. 

3. Amano, Isiike, Gifu-ken — 
Figured silk crape. 

4. Asahi Silk Manufacturing Co., 

M iyagi'ken — 
Raw silk. 

5. Asano, Shinzaburo, Gifu-ken — 
Figured silk crape. 

Silk crape. 



6. Asano, Toyozo, representative 

of Tokushinsha, Nagano- 
ken — 
Raw silk. 

7. Atako Silk Manufacturing Co., 

Shidzuoka-kcn — 
Raw silk. 

8. Choshin Silk Manufacturing 

Co., Nagano-ken — 
Raw silk. 

9. Date, Toraichi, Tenjin-Kita- 

maclii, Kyoto — 
Brocades. 

10. Fuji, Boseki, Kabushiki Kwai- 

sha, Tokyo — 
Silk thread. 

11. Fujikawa Bros., Takikawa 

Silk Factory, Hokkaido — 
Raw silk. 

12. Fujiki, Kaichiro, Kodemma- 

cJio, Nihonbashi-ku, Tokio — 
Handkerchiefs of silk. 

13. Fujisaki, Saburosuke, Sen- 

dai — 
"Habutai." 

14. Fukui Silk Fabric Association, 

Fukui-ken — 
Plain **Habutai." 
Twilled *^Habutai." 
Figured "Habutai." 
Thin silk fabric. 
Handkerchiefs. 

15. Fukushima-kcn, Kogyo Shi- 

kcn-jo, Fukushima-ken — 
"Habutai." 

16. Fukushima-ken Silk Fabric 

Association, Fukushima- 
ken — 
"Habutai." 



154 



Japanese Exhibition, 



17. Fukuwara, Unosuke, Kuro- 

mon-dori Ichijo, Kyoto — 
"Atsuita" .fabric. 

18. Gifu Silk Fabric Co,, Gtfu- 

ken — 
Broad figured silk crape. 
Figured silk crape. 

19. Gisaisha, Yamaguchi-ken — 
Raw silk. 

20. Goscn Silk Fabric Co., Nii- 

gata-ken — 
"Yatsuhashi" fabric. 

21. Government Sericultural In- 

stitute, Tokio — 
Raw silk. 

22. Gunje Silk Manufa<:turing 

Co., KyotO'fu — 
Raw silk. 

23. 'Habtitai Goshi Kwaisha, Ya- 

magata-ken — 
"Habutai." 

24. Hakata Fabric Manufactur- 

ing Association, Fukuoka- 
ken — 
Silk fabric. 

25. Hakkivaku Kzvaisha, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Raw silk. 

26. Hakusei Kwan, Fukushima- 

ken — 
Raw silk. 

27. Hainabe, Gihachiro, Ogawa- 

dori, Ichijo, Kyoto — 
Silk curtain. 

28. Hama, Hachitaro, Nagano- 

ken — 
Raw silk. 

29. Hamami, Rishichi, Kyoto-fu — 
Silk crape. 



30. Hasegawa, Gosaburo, pro- 

prietor of Hasegawa Silk 
Factory, Yamagata-ken — 
Raw silk. 

31. Hat tori, Magobei, Nagoya — 
Dyed silk. 

32. Hattori, Tominosuke, repre- 

sentative of Hakusei Sha, 
Miye-ken — 
Raw silk. 

33. Hattori, Yoyemon, Nagoya — 
Dved silk. 

34. Hayashi, Seihei, representative 

of Hayashi Gumi, Nagano- 
ken — 
Raw silk. 

35. Hayashi, Seikichi, Nagano- 

ken — 
Raw silk. 

36. Higami, Kyodosha, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Raw silk. 

37. Hi go Silk Manufacturing Co., 

Kumamoto-ken — 
Raw silk. 

38. Hikisa Silk Manufacturing 

Co., Shidzuoka-ken — 
Raw silk. 

39. Hirata, Ryozen, Kabushiki, 

Kzvaisha, Shimane-ken — 
Raw silk. 

40. Hirooka, Ihei, Muro-vxachi, 

Kyoto — 
''Yuzen" for foreign dress. 
"Yuzen." 
Dved silk. 
Dress. 

41.. Hisada, Izaemon, Nagoya — 
Silk table cloth, shawl, etc. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



155 



42. Hisajima, Buuhachi, Naga- 

saki-ken — 
Handkerchiefs. 

43. Hisajima, Seikichi, Yamana- 

shi-ken — 
"Kaiki" silk. 

44. Histii Sha, Shimane-ken — 
Raw silk. 

45. Hochu Silk Manufacturing 

Co., Oita-ken — 
Raw silk. 

46. Hodono, Sobei, Yehime-ken — 
Raw silk. 

47. Hon Rokkosha, Nagano-ken—^ 
Raw silk. 

48. Ichikawa, Kumajiro, Yamana- 

shi-ken — 
"Kaiki." 

49. lida, Shinshichi, Karasumaru, 

Takatsuji, Kyoto — 
Silk fabric for ladies' dress. 
Silk fabrics for ladies' sash. 
"Habutai" white. 

50. Inada, Uhachi, Omiya Kami- 

dachi-uri, Kyoto — 
Black satin. 

51. luagaki, Tsunekichi, represen- 

tative of the Inagaki Gomel 
Kwaisha, Muro-machi Ane- 
gakoji, Kyoto — 

'*Kuretakori" fabric. 

Silk crape. 

Silk crape striped lengthwise. 

"Habutai." 

"Habutai," twilled. 

Silk muslin. 

Crape with satin stripes. 

Stitched silk crape. 



52. Inouye, Ichiro, representative 

of Kitatsuru "Kaiki" Fabric 
Manufacturing Association, 
Yamanashi-ken — 
"Kaiki." 

53. Inouye, Rikizo, Kanudachi- 

uri, Shimmachi, Kyoto — 
Specimens of various kinds of 
fabrics. 

54. Inuishi, Toshichi, Kyoto-fu — 
Raw silk. 

55. lohara Silk Manufacturing 

Co,, Shidsuoka-ken — 
Raw silk. 

56. Ishikawa-ken Export Silk 

Manufacturers' Association, 
Kanazawd — 
"Habutai." 
"Habutai," figured. 
Thin silk fabric. 
"Habutai," striped. 
Stuff for handkerchiefs. 
'Kaiki" woven with gased thread. 
'Habutai" woven with gased 
thread. 

57. Ishioka Silk Factory, Ibaraki- 

ken — 
Raw silk. 

58. Ito, Chiubei, Hon-machi, 

Osaka — 
Twilled silk sleeve lining for for- 
eign dress. 
**Kobai" kaiki. 

59. Ito, Kozayemon, Miye-ken — 
Raw silk. 

60. Ito, Sentaro, Shidzuoka-ken — 
Raw silk. 

61. Ito Silk Manufacturing Co., 

Wakavama-ken — 
Raw silk. 



«- 



<<i 



156 



Japanese Exhibition, 



62. Ito Silk Weaving Co,, Na- 

goya — 
Figured "Habutai." 

63. Ito, Yojiro, Gifu-ken — 
Raw silk. 

64. Iwakuni Silk Manufacturing 

Co,, Yamaguchi'ken — 
Raw silk. 

65. Iwamoto, Ryosuke, Tochigi- 

keii — 
Figured silk. 

66. hvashita, Zcnshichiro, Tochi- 

gi'ken — 
Silk fabric. 

67. lyo Shirataki Silk Manufac- 

turing Co,, Yehime-ken — 
Raw silk. 

68. Josui Sha, Tokyo-fu — 
Raw silk. 

69. Junsui Kzvan, Nagano-ken — 
Raw silk. 

70. Kagami, Goyemon, Yaniana- 

shi-ken — 
Fabric for umbrella. 

71. Kageyu, Jinshiro, Aichi-ken — 
Raw silk. 

72. Kagoshima-ken, Jusansha, Ka- 

goshima-ken — 
Raw silk. 

y2i' Kahata, Mansuke, Kyoto- fu — 
*'Habutai" crape. 
Silk fabric. 

74. Kaimei Sha, Nagano-ken — 
Raw silk. 

75. Kaisho Kwaisha, Gifu-ken — 
Raw silk. 

76. Kaishin, Kwaisha, Saita ma- 

ken — 
Raw silk. 



iC 



ii- 



77. Kamimura, Jokin, Niigata- 

ken — 
"Horai" fabric. 

78. Kaiyama, Kiichiro, Onoye-cho, 

Yokohama — 
Habutai," figured. 
Kobai kaiki." 
*Kobai kaiki," figured. 
**Kobai kaiki," with weft of gased 

thread, figured. 
'*Kobai kaiki" mixed with gased 
thread. 

79. Kamo Silk Manufacturing Co,, 

Gifu-ken — 
Raw silk. 

80. Kanamori, Kichijiro, Gifu- 

ken — 
Raw silk. 

81. Kaneda, Chiubei, Horikawa 

Kammidachi-uri, Kyoto — 
Damask. 
Brocade. 

82. Kanrakusha, Gunma-ken — . 
Raw silk. 

83. Kasazvara, Fusakichi, Repre- 

sentative of Riujo Kzi'an, 
Nagano-ken — 
Raw silk. 

84. Katagiri, Ryoya, Nagano- 

ken — 
Raw silk. 

85. Katakura, Kanetaro, Repre- 

sentative of Kaiagura 
Gumi, Nagano-ken — 
Raw silk. 

86. Katakura, Kiuhei, Nagano- 

ken — 
Raw silk. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



157 



Sy. Kataniwa, Torakichi, Shin- 
ogawa-machi, Ushigomi- 
ku, Tokio — 
Handkerchiefs. 

88. Kato, Genji, Benten-dori, Yo- 

kohama — 
Handkerchiefs. 

89. Katsuno & Co,, Gifu-ken — 
Raw silk. 

90. Kazvamoto, Shobei, Higashin- 

otoin, Rokkaku, Kyoto — 
Silk fabrtc (kanoko). 
White crape. 
Table cloth. 

91. Kazvamura, Yakei, Nagoya — 
Handkerciefs. 

92. Kawashima, Chojiuro, Toch- 

igi'ken — 
Damask. 
"Kohaku" fabric. 

93. Kawashima, Jinbei, San jo, 

Higashinotoin, Kyoto — 
Pieces of brocade set in frames. 
"Yamatoori" fabric curtain. 
Curtain. 

^*Honkokuori" curtain. 
^'Genkiori" curtain. 
Brocade curtain. 
^*Honkokuori" for drapery. 
Damask for drapery. 
"Yamatoori" for cushion. 
*'Honkokuori" doilies. 
Patent "Midarekanoko." 
Patent *'Asahiori." 

94. Kayanuma, Kunihei, Yaman- 

shi-ken — 
Fabric for lining. 

95. Kazama Silk Factory, Yama- 

nashi'ken — 
Raw silk. 



96. Kcnshi Boseki Kabushiki 

Kzvaisha, Higashi Takeya- 
machi, Kyoto — 
Spun silk thread. 

97. KimpO'Sha, Y amanashi-ken — 
Raw silk. 

98. Kimura, Asashichi, Tochigi- 

ken — 
**Kohaku/' figured. 

99. Kimnra, Tosuke, Osaka 

Branch OMce Minami-kin- 
taro-machi, Osaka — 
"Shuchin" fabric interwoven 
with pure gold thread. 

100. Kiriu Manufacturers* Asso- 

ciation, Gunma-ken — 
"Habutai." 

'Habutai/' dyed. 

'Habutai," figured. 

'Habutai," figured and dyed. 

'Habutai," striped. 
Silk crape. 
Silk crape, dyed. 
"Hama kohaku." 
"Monsha habutai." 
"Ro'' (silk gauge), figured. 
Satin, figured. 
"Kohaku," figured. 
"Kobai kaiki." 

Lining stuff for foreign dress. 
"Orihime" satin. 
Cotton satin. 

loi. Kisennuma Silk Manufact- 
uring Co., Miyagi-ken — 
Raw silk. 

102. Kitahama, Sanjiuro, Masa- 
go-cho, Yokohama — 
"Kobai" fabric. 



((' 



if 



ti- 



if 



IS8 



Japanese Exhibition, 



103. Kitaichi Company, Minami- 
Naka-dori, Yokohama — 

"Habutai." 

103a. Kiyoshi, Sugawa, Yoko- 
hama — 
**Habutai," silk, Kawamata. 
**Habutai/' silk, 5 m. to 15 m. 
Twill "habutai." 
Jacquard "habutai." 
Fancy **kaiki." 
Corded "kaiki." 
Corded "kaiki," cotton weft. 
Taffeta. 
Figured satin. 
Satin striped taffeta. 
Crape. 

104. Kobayashi, Kiichi, Naga- 
saki-ken — 

White "habutai." 

105. Kobayashi, Shinshichi, Kyo- 

to-fu — 
"Habutai" crape. 
Silk fabric. 

106. Kobayashi, Shinsaburo, Rep- 

resentative of Koyo Kzvan, 
Yamanashi-ken — 
White "habutai," raw silk. 

107. Konan - Sha, Yamanashi- 

ken — 
White "habutai." 

108. Kono & Co,, Yehime-ken — 
White "habutai." 

109. Kono Gomei-Kzvaisha, Ye- 

hime-ken — 
"Habutai." 

no. Kosan-Sha, Hyo go-ken — 
"Habutai," raw silk. 

III. Kosei-Sha, Yamanashi-ken — 
"Habutai." 



112. Kotsuna, Korejiro, Masago- 

cho, Yokohama — 
"Kawamata habutai." 

113. Kubota, Kwan, Nagano- 

ken — 
''Kawamata habutai," raw silk. 

114. Kubota, Ryotaro, Nagano- 

ken — 
"Kawamata habutai," saw silk. 

115. • Kumagaye Silk Manufacture 

iptg Co., Saitama-ken — 
"Kawamata habutai." 

116. Kumamoto Silk Manufactur- 

ing Co., Kumamoto-ken — 
"Kawamata habutai." 

117. Kunijima, Chiusuke, Toch- 

igi-ken — 
Figured fabric. 

118. Kurokazva, Rikimatsu, Doji- 

ma-Hamadori, Osaka — 
"Habutai," painted. 

119. Kusaka, Yasusayemon, Hy- 

ogo-ken — 
Figured fabric, raw silk. 

120. Kutsumidzu, Bunjiro, Shiga- 

ken — 
Crape. 

121. Kutsumidzu, Seijiro, Shiga- 
ken — 

Crape. 

122. Kzvansai Silk Manufacturing 

Co., Miye-ken — 
Raw silk. 

123. Kyodo, Kiito, Nitsukuri Sho, 

Fukushima-ken — 
Raw silk. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



159 



124. Kyoto Dyers' Association, 
Kamanosa Takeya-machi, 
Kyoto — 

Painted velvet. 
Painted crape. 
Painted "habutai." 
Painted muslin. 
Dyed "habutai." 
Black "habutai." 
Dyed crape. 

125. Kyoto Fabric Mapiufacturing 

Co., Yoshida-machi, Ky- 
oto — 

**Miyako" satin. 
"Toyo" damask and samples. 
Thin twilled ^ilk fabric. 
Stuff for foreign ladies' dress. 

126. Kyoto Silk Manufacturing 

Co., Kyoto — 
Raw silk. 

127. Machida, Tokunosukc, Kuro- 
fnne-cho, Asakusa-ku, To- 
kyo — 

Silk thread. 

129. Maki, Shinshichi, Nagano- 

ken — 
Raw silk. 

128. Maki, Mosuke, Nagano- 

ken — 
Silk thread. 

130. Makita, Kichiichiro, Yantan- 

ashi-ken — 
Fabric for lining. 

131. Maruyama, Koichiro, Repre- 

sentative of Yonezawa Silk 
Manufacturing Co., Yama- 
gata-ken — 
Raw silk. 



132. Matsumoto, Kyozo, Shi- 

mane-ken — 
Raw silk. 

133. Matsumura, Jinyemon, Ni- 
shikinokoji, Muromachi, 
Kyoto — 

Silk muslin. 

134. Matsu-ura, Yoshimatsu, 

Benten-dori, Yokohama — 
Silk crape. 
Frenbh crape. 
"Habutai." 
"Kawamata habutai." 

135. Matsuoka, Keiji, Miyagi- 

ken — 
Raw silk. 

136. Mikawa Silk Manufacturing 

Co., Aichi-ken — 
Raw silk. 

137. Mimasaka Silk Manufactur- 
ing Co., Okayama-ken — 

Raw silk. 

138. Minakanishi, Yeizaburo, 

Rokkaku Higashinotoin, 

Kyoto — 
Stuff for curtain. 
Handkerchiefs. 
Pillow cases. 

139. Mitsui, Nihei, Representa- 
tive of Hakkwaku-Sha, Na- 
gano-ken — 

Raw silk. 

140. Miura Silk Factory, Yama- 
gata-ken — 

Raw silk. 

141. Miyagi-Ken "Habutai'' Man- 

ufacturing Association, Sen- 
dat — 
**Habutai." 



i6o 



Japanese Exhibition, 



142. Miyakonojo Silk Manufact- 

uring Co,, Miyasaki-ken — 
Raw silk. 

143. Miyasaki Silk Manufactur- 

ing Co,, Miyasaki-ken — 
Raw silk. 

144. Miyauchi Silk Manufactur- 
ing Co., Yamagata-ken — 

Raw silk. 

145. Mochitsuki, Heitaro, Shidsu- 

oka-ken — 
Raw silk. 

146. Morii, Kiichiro, Bukkoji, 

Nishinotoin, Kioto — 
Ribbon. 

147. Murasakino Fabric Manu- 

facturing Co., Atago, Omi- 
ya, Kyoto — 
Satin for dress. 

148. Nagano-Ken Export Silk 

Fabric Manufacturers' As- 
sociation, Nagano-ken — 
Twilled "habutai." 

149. Nagaoka, Manpei, Repre- 
sentative of Shinyo-Kwan, 
Nagano-ken — 

Raw silk. 

150. Nagase Masajiro, Gifu- 

ken — 
"Habutai," figured. 

151. Nagoya Kokusan Shibori 
Shoko Dogyo Kumiai, Na- 
goya— 

Dyed fabric. 
Table cloth. 

152. Nakamura, Hanbei, Higa- 
shinotoin, Rokkaku, Ky- 
oto — 

Brocade. 

"Kara ori" fabric. 



153. Nakasawa, Rihachi, Go jo, 

Tominokoji, Kyoto — 
"Kohaku," figured. 

154. Namikawa, Rijiro, Shimane- 

ken — 
Raw silk. 

155. Nanpo-Kzvan, Oita-ken — 
Raw silk. 

156. Nemoto, Sensuke, Minami- 
jimbo-cho, Kanda-ku, To- 
kyo — 

Silk thread for embroidery. 

157. Nihon Katasome Kwaisha, 

Shidsuoka-ken — 
•"Hosho" fabric. 

158. Nishida, Kahei, Uye-no- 

machi, Shitaya-ku, Tokyo — 
Silk thread. 
Thread of weaving velvet. 

159. Nishikaiva, Kobei, Karasu- 

maru, Kyoto — 
White plain "habutai." 
White figured "habutai.' 
White twilled "habutai.' 
White silk crape. 
White figured crape. 

160. Nishimura, Jihei, San jo, Mu- 

romachi, Kyoto — 
Silk crape. 
'*Habutai," figured. 
Fabric for foreign dress. 
"Mivako habutai." 
Silk muslin. 

161. Nishimura, Kinjiro, Yedo- 

boriminami-dori, Osaka — 
"Kobai" fabric. 

162. Niu'a, Taichiro, Miye-ken — 
Raw silk. 



♦> 



>» 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



161 



163. Nomura, Itaro, Representa- 

tive of Sanren-Sha, Aichi- 
ken — 
Raw silk. 

164. Obama Silk Manufacturing 

Co,, Fukui'ken — 
Raw silk. 

165. Ochi Silk Manufacturing 
Co., Kochi'ken — 

Raw silk. 

166. Ofuji Co., Kyoto-fu — 
Silk crape. 

Silk fabric. 

167. Ogaiva Sakuhei, Representa- 
tive of " Hamachirimen*^ 
Manufacturers* Association, 
Shiga-ken — 

Crape. 

168. Oguchi, Mnrakichi, Nagano- 
ken — 

Raw silk. 

169. Oguchi, Yoshishige, Repre- 
sentative of Oguchi Giimi, 
Nagano-ken — 

Raw silk. 

170. Oishi, Takichi, Seudai — 
Cocoon bags of strong paper. 

171. Okatani Silk Manufacturing 
Co., Nagano-ken — 

Raw silk. 

172. Okimo Takijiro, Muromachi- 
Kashira, Kyoto — 

Silk and cotton fabrics. 

173. Omi Hara Silk Factory, Shi- 
ga-ken — 

Raw silk. 

174. Omi Silk Manufacturing 
Co., Shiga-ken — 

Raw silk. 



175. Ono, Kyosuke, Nagano- 

ken — 
Raw silk. 

176. Orimono Kenkiu Jo, Kyoto- 

Silk fabric and crape. 

177. Osachi Kisaku, Kitanagasa- 
dori, Kobe — 

Plain "habutai." ^ 
Twilled ''habutai." 

178. Osu Silk Manufacturing Co., 

Yehime-ken — 
Raw silk. 

179. Ozawa, Fukutaro, Nagano- 
ken — 

Raw silk. 

180. Rokkosha, Nagano-ken — 
Raw silk. 

181. Rokumonsen Goshi Kzvai- 

sha, Nagano-ken — 
Raw silk. 

182. Ryokaku, Shonai, Represent- 

ative of Tomioka-Kivan, 
Nagano-kep — 
Raw silk. 

183. Ryoseisha, Fukushima-ken — 
Raw silk. 

184. Ryoii Silk Manufacturing 

Co., Yamagata-ken — 
Raw silk. 

185. Sa garni Kogyo Co., Kana- 

<razva-ken — 
Silk and mixed fabrics. 

186. Saitama Silk Manufacturing 

Co., Saitama-ken — 
Raw silk. 

187. Saito, Soichi, Yamagata- 

ken — 
"Kohaku." 
Silk fabric. 



l62 



Japanese Exhiditiox, 



1 88. Sakai Silk Manufaciiiring 

Co., Tottori-ken — 
Raw silk. 

189. Saknra Silk Manufacturing 

Co., Okayama-ken — 
Raw silk. 

190. Sanin Silk Manufacturing 

Co., Tottori'ken — 
Raw silk. 

191. Sano Silk Factory, Miya^i- 

ken — 
Raw silk. 

192. Sanriusha, Aichi-ken — 
Raw silk. 

193. Sansei Company, Fukushi- 

nia-kcn — 
Raw silk. 



194. S any en Floss 
facturcrs* 
Aichi'ken — 
Floss silk. 



Silk Mann- 
Association, 



1^5. Sarashina ' Sha, Xai^ano- 
ken — 
Raw silk. 

196. Saicada, Ryotaro, Aichi- 
ken — 
"Arimatsu Shibori." 

i()7. Sazcamura, Tasliiclii, Sltitt- 
niachi, Nishikinokoji, Ky- 
oto — 
Crape. 

T98. Saya^ij;a7iv Silk Factory, 
Aichi-ken — 
Raw silk. 

i()9. Seishi Kosui Goshi Kii^aisha, 
Gunma-kcn — 
Raw silk. 



200. Seki, Gosuke. representative 
of Toyei Sha, Xagano-ken — 
Raw silk. 
20T. Sekikawa, So::;aburo, Xa- 
gano-ken — 
Raw silk. 

202. Sekine, Torakichi, Honkoku- 

cho, N ihon bash i-k u , Tok \o — 
Twilled fabric for foreign dress. 
Lining for foreign dress. 

203. Seki, Shinpei, Xiigata-ken — 
"Habutai." 

**Habutai/' twilled. 
''Habutai/' figured. 

204. Shibata, Genzaycnwn, Shiga- 

ken — 
Stitched figured crape. 
Crape figured. 

205. Shimamura, Zensuke, Akezu- 

mon Matsubura, Kyoto — 
Painted crape. 
Painted figured crape. 

206. Shimidcu, Jiunzo, Xiigata- 

ken — 
•Habutai." 
^'Habutai/' twilled. 
"Horai ori'' fabric. 

207. Shimodate Silk Manufacture 

ing Co.j fbaraki-ken — 
Raw silk. 

208. Shinionida - Sha. Gunnia- 
ken — 

Raw silk. 

209. Shimoshiro, Yaichiro, repre- 

sentative of Isezaki Fabric 
Manufacturers Association, 
Gunma-ken — 

Stuff for umbrellas. 

-Kohaku." 

•'Habutai." 

Sleeve lining. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



163 



210. Shinkaiy Sukeroku, represen- 

tative of Yawata Silk Fac- 
tory, Yamanashi-ken — 
Raw silk. 

211. Shinsei-Sha, Nagano-ken — 
Raw silk. 

212. Shiraishi Seishi Kigio Kzvai- 

sha, Miyagi-ken — 
Raw silk. 

213. Shojo, Kwan, Nagano-ken — 
Raw silk. 

214. Shoyo-Ken, Nagano-ken — 
Raw silk. 

215. Shummei Goshi Kwaisha, 

Nagano-ken — 
Raw silk. 

216. Silk Conditioning House, 

Yokohama — 
Raw silk. 

217. Sowa, Kaichiro, Tokio — 
Silk and satin fabrics. 

218. Suganuma, Kunihei, Yama- 
nashi-ken — ' 

Lining of cloths. 

219. Sngawa, Kiyoshi, Honcho, 

Yokohama — 
Silk fabric. 

"Kobai kaiki," cotton weft. 
•'Kohaku." 

"Kawamata Habutai." 
Satin, figured for dress. 
**Kohaku." 
-Habutai." 

**Kohaku," with satin stripe, fig- 
ured. 
"Habutai," twilled. 
Crape. 

•'Kaiki," striped. 
Crape, figured. 
•'Kobai kaiki." 



220. Stiya, Kitihei, Sannomtya, 

Kobe- 
Silk fabric. 
"Kobai" fabric. 

221. Suzuki, Jinkichi, proprietor 

of Yoneya Silk Factory, 
Miyagi-ken — 
Raw silk. 

222. Suzuki, Toyosukc, Furo-cho, 

Yokohama — 
*'Habutai." ; 

223. Taisei Sha, Nagano-ken — 
Raw silk. 

224. ' Takada Co,, Muromachi San- 

jo, Kyoto — 
Silk crape. 
Silk fabric. 
Silk crape, figured. 
Silk crape, stitched. 
Silk crape stitched with colored 

thread. 
Silk fabric, figured. 
Figured crape, painted. 
Craped satin. 
"Habutai," figured. 
"Alivoki" silk fabric. 
French crape. 

225. Takagi, Mankichi, represen- 
tative of Takagi & Co., Na- 
goya — 

Dved fabric. 



Moto-Kyo- 



226. Takaha, Fujio, 
rinchi, Kobe — 

Handkerchiefs. 
"Habutai." 
Silk fabric. 

227. Takahashi, Kcitaro, Gifu- 

ken — 
Crape, figured. 



164 



Japanese Exhibition, 



228. Takahashi, Magota, represen- 
tative of A^agai Gumi, Yatna- 
gata-ken — 

Raw silk. 

229. Takanabe Silk Manufactur- 
ing Co., Miyasaki-ken — 

Raw silk. 

230. Takaoka Silk Manufacturing 
Co,, Miye-ken — 

Raw silk. 

231 Takata Silk Fabric Co., Nii- 
gata-ken — 
Silk fabric. 

232. Takayawa, Yosokichi, Tako- 
yakushi Nishinotoin, Kyoto — 

Table cloths of painted fabric. 
"Fukusa*' cloth of painted fabric. 
Painted fabric. 

233. Takeday Kihei, Nagoya — 
"Arimatsu shibori." 

234. Takei, Torataro, Nagano- 
Ken — 

Raw silk. 

235. Taiwbc, Shujiro, representa- 
tive of Bokujo Sha, Gifu- 
kcn — 

Raw silk. 

236. Tofiaka, Scibei, Gifu-ken — 
Raw silk. 

237. Taiiaka, Tomikichi, Sasaya- 
viachi-dori Rokken-machi, 
Kyoto — 

Handkerchiefs. 

238. Tango, Cliirimen, Yoshagun 

Orimono Kenkiujo, Kyoto- 
fu- 
*'Namiori" crape. 



239. Tasc, Kamegoro, Yamagata- 
ken — 

Raw silk. 

240. Tase, Kichiroji, Yamagata- 
Ken— 

Raw silk. 

241. Tenryu, Sha, Nagano-ken — 
Raw silk. 

242. Tcnyu, Sha, Nagano-ken — 
Raw silk. 

243. Togunsha, Yamagata-ken — 
Raw silk. 

244. T oho ku sha, Fukushima- 
ken — 

Raw silk. 

245. Tokamachi Fabric Manufac- 
turers' Association, Niigata- 
ken — 

"Kohakii," figured. 
**Kohaku," striped. 
Satin, white. 
**Hananomori" fabric. 

246. Tokosha, Nagano-ken — 
Raw silk. 

247. Toyone Silk Manufacturing 

Co., Miyagi-ken — 
Raw silk. 

248. T omit a, Daijiro, Nagoya — 
"Arimatsu shibori." 
"Arimatsu shibori," table cloth. 

249. Totnita, Usaburo, Terano- 
uchi, Omiya, Kyoto — 

''Shuchin" fabric. 
Shuchin fabric for ladies' dress. 
**Shuchin" fabric for handker- 
chiefs. 

250. Tomojima, Kiujiro, Gifu- 
ken — 

Silk handkerchiefs. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



165 



251. Tonobori, Yoshibei, Ryogai- 
cho, Nijo, Kyoto — 

Stuff for tapestry. 

Fabrics. 

White hemp fabrics. 

252. Toyotama Fabric Manufact- 
ure Co., Sendagaya, To- 
kyo — 

*Toyotama" fabric for um- 
brellas. 

253. Toyama-Ken Export Silk 
Fabric Manufacturers' As- 
ciation, Toyama-ken — 

"Habutai." 

254. Tsukahara Soyemon, Yama- 
gata-ken — 

Raw silk. 

255. Tsukui, Heiyemon, Benten- 
dori, Yokohama — 

Silk fabric interwoven with lace, 
silk and cotton fabrics. 

256. Tsuyama Silk Manufactur- 
ing Co., Okayama-ken — 

Raw silk. 

257. Ukita, Sahei, Okayama- 
ken — 

Raw silk. 

258. Uno, Kosaburo, Takoyaku- 
shi, Shimmachi, Kyoto — 

"Habutai." 
Silk fabric. 

259. Unpin Sanshi Manufactur- 
ing Co,, Fukui-ken — 

Raw silk. 

260. Ushida, Goro, Yamanashi- 
ken — 

"Kaiki." 

261. Usui-Sha, Gunma-ken — 
Raw silk. 



262. Ut'sunomiya Silk Manufact- 
uring Co., Tochigi-ken — 

• Raw silk. 

263. Uyehara, Ichijiro, Represent- 
ative of Saishin Sha, Naga- 
no-ken — 

Raw silk. 

264. Uyeno, Shiny em on, Shiga- 
ken — 

Crape, painted. 

265. Usen Habutai Manufactur- 
ers' Association, Yamataga- 
ken — 

"Habutai." 

266. Uzen Hokko Sha, Yamagata^ 
ken— 

Raw silk. 

267. Wakao, Ikuso, Hon-cho, Yo- 
kohama — 

Raw silk. 

268. IVatanabe, Motonosukc, Rep- 

resentative of IVatanabe 
Silk Factory, Nagano-ken — 
Raw silk. 

269. Watanabe, Rokumatsu, Rep- 
resentative of Nagaoka Silk 
Manufacturing Co., AHigata- 
ken — 

Raw silk. 

270. Watanabe, Tatsuji, Yamaga- 

ta-ken — 
Raw silk. 

271. Yajima, Gunii, Yamanashi- 
ken — 

Raw silk. 

2^2. Yajima, Seijiro, Representa- 
tive of Yajima Sha, Nagano- 
ken — 
Raw silk. 



i66 



Japanese Exhibition, 



273. Yamada, Shin, Fukushima- 284. Yoko Sanshi Kabushiki 
ken — Kwaisha, Nagano-ken — 

Raw silk. Raw silk. 

274. Yawaguchi, Goro, Shidzno- 285. Yokosuka Silk Manufactur- 
ka-ken — ing Co., Shidsuoka-ken — 

Raw silk. Raw silk. 



275. Yamanioto, Isakichi, Yoko- 
hama — 

Silk handkerchiefs. 
"Habutai." 

276. Yamanaka, Genshichi, Aichi- 
ken — 

"Arimatsushibori." 

277. Yainanashi Silk Manufactur- 
ing Ct>., Yamanashi-ken — 

Raw Silk. 

278. Yasuda, Genzo, Tochigi- 
ken — 

Twilled "kaiki" for handker- 
chiefs. 

279. Yazcata Silk Manufacturing 
Co. Shim- Ken — 

Raw silk. 

280. Yazaki, Genzo, representa- 
tive of Shinko Kwan, Naga- 
no-Ken — 

Raw silk. 



28 1 . Yctsuyo - KiK*an , 
ken — 
Raw silk. 



Niigata- 



282. Yoda. Sajihei, Representa- 
tive of Jonan Sha, Shidzuo- 
ka-ken — 

Raw silk. 

283. Yoda-Sha, Xagana-ken — 
Raw silk. 



286. Yunago Silk Manufacturing 
Co., Tottori-ken — 

Raw silk. 

287. Yoshida, Kamejiu, Tokyo- 
fu- 

Gunpowder bags. 
Stuff for medicine bag (A). 
Stuff for medicine bag (B). 
Stuff for medicine bag (C). 

288. Yoshida, Yeisuke, Saitama- 
ken — 

Raw silk. 

289. Yoshizazca, Itaro, Nagano- 
ken — 

Raw silk. 

290. Yoshizaiva, Sadajiro, Naga- 
no-ken — 

Raw silk. 

291. Yni Co., Fukushima-ken — 
•^Habutai." 

292. Yumei Sha, Nagano-ken — 
Raw silk. 

293. Zenshin Sha, Kanagawa- 
ken — 

Raw silk. 

294. Zuiho Sha, Nagano-ken — 
Raw silk. 



295. Ziiishin 
ken — 
Raw silk. 



Kzvan, Nagano- 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



167 



GROUP 58. 

Embroidefy* 
(Palace of Varied Indostiiet.) 

1. A ok I, Hachiyemon, Shiga- 

ken — 

Tapestries. 
Curtain. 
Folding screen. 

2. Asai, Rihaclii, Xagoya — 

Curtains. 
Stove screen. 
Embroidered curtains. 

3. Bcnten-Goshi'Kzvaisha, Shim- 

monzcn, Kyoto — 

Tapestry of embroidery. 
Embroidered folding screens. 
Embroidered bed spread. 
Pieces of embroidery work. 
Embroidered costume. 

4. Fujikakc, Yozayemon, Tori- 

Abiira-chOy Nihonbashi-ku, 
Tokyo — 
Lace. 

5. Fiijiki, Kaicliiro, Kodemma- 

clio, Xihonbashi-ku, Tokyo — 

Embroidered folding screens. 
Embroidered curtains. 

f}. Fukii'i, Gcnjiro, Kitanaka-dori, 
Yokohama — 

Handkerchiefs. 
"Fukusa" (silk wrapper). 

7. Fukunaga, Tohei, Tokushima- 
kcn — 

Tapestry. 
Tablet. 
Pillow case. 



8. Fnwa, Kanjiro, Sannomiya, 

Kobe— 
Handkerchiefs. 
Shawls. 
Kimono (Japanese costumes). 

9. Girls' Industrial School^ To- 

kio — 
Embroidery. 

10. Hachikawa, Unosuke, Axvaji- 

cho, Osaka — 
Doilies. 

11. Hasegawa, Shozo, Toyaina- 

ken — 
Tablet. 
Japanese lady's gown. 

12. Hashimoto, Yoshitsugu, Sak- 

uragi'cho, Yokohama — 
Curtains. 
Stove screen. 
Table cloth. 
Pillow cases. 
Cliair covers. 
Tablets. 
Hangings. 

Scalloped handkerchiefs. 
Hemmed handkerchiefs. 
Doilies. 

Photograph cases. 
Curtain. 

13. Hayakawa, Tamasaku, Onoye- 

eho, Yokohama — 
Silk scallops. 
Linen table cloths. 
I^inen doilies. 

14. lida, Shinshichi, Karasumaru, 

Kyoto — 
Tapestries. 
Folding screens. 
Bed spread. 
Table cloths. 



i68 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Tablets. 

Lady's costume. 

Cloths to be used for tablets. 

Curtains. 

15. Imamura, Hanzaburo, Naga- 

saki — 
Pieces of embroidery work. 

16. hvata, Toyoo, Yamashita-cho, 

Yokohama — 
(rard cases. 
Purses. 
Tablets. 

Kimono (Japanese costumes). 
Lady's gowns. 
Dressing sack. 
Shoulder collar. 
Lady's summer cape. 
Lady's collars. 
Shawl. 
Table cloths. 
Napkins. 
Center pieces. 
Lace. 
Folding screens. 

17. Kajimoto, Keikichi, Kobe — 
Doilies. 

Embroidery. 

18. Kawashima, Jinbei, San jo Hi- 

gashinotoin, Kyoto — 
Patent "Hagoromo" fabric. 
Patent "Hagoromo** (kubimaki). 

19. Kanacawa, Kamekichi, Bnngo- 

machi, Osaka — 
Gold braid for trimming of mil- 
itary uniforms. 

20. Kanasawa Shi Shishiii, St. 

Louis (Shuppin Kumiai, 

Ishikawa-ken ) — 
"Gaku" of embroidery work. 
Various kinds of handkerchiefs. 



Plate doilies. 
Center piece and doilies. 
Center pieces. 
Embroidered tapestries. 
Embroidered pillow case. 
Embroideries. 
Embroidered cloth. 
Screen of embroidery. 
Embroidered fans. 

21. Kataoka, Fuyukichi, Ibaraki- 

ken — 
Table cloth. 
Stove screen. 
Pillow case. 
Chair cover. 

22. Kawaguchi, Bunzaycmon, Xa- 

goya— 
Stove screen. 
Table cloth. 
Flower vase doilies. 
Handkerchiefs. 

23. Kawashima, Jinbei, Sanjo, 

Kyoto — 
Embroidered curtains. 

24. Kitahama, Sanjitiro, Masago- 

cho, Yokohama — 
Handkerchiefs. 
Doilies. 
Table cloth. 

25. Kitaoka, Gennosuke, Tomino- 

Koji, Kyoto — 
Tablet of embroidery. 

26. Komaki, Bunjiro, Choja-ma- 

chi, Yokohama — 
Embroidery. 

26a Midzutani, Tetsnzo, Nago- 
ya— 
Handkerchiefs. 
Plate doilies. 
Table cloth. 



J 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



169 



27. Kori, Kiutaro,' Tokushima- 

ken — 
Embroidered folding screen. 

28. Matsuoka, Kiushichi, Sanno- 

miya, Kobe — 
Embroidery. 
Fire screen. 

29. Mayeda, Yoshichiro, Sabiye- 

cho, Kobe — 
Embroidery. 

30. Miyata, Totaro, Benten-dori, 

Yokohama — 
Hangings. 

31. Momonoi, Tatstw, Yokoha- 

ma — 
Folding screen. 

32. Mori, Fuki, Nagoya — 
Embroidered handkerchiefs. 
Stove covers. 

Table cloth. 
Pillow cases. 
Cravats. 

33. Murata, Tokumatsu, Shinsai- 

bashi-suji, Osaka — 
"Gaku" of embroidery. 
Embroidered doilies. 

34. Nakanishi, Gihei, Fukiya-cho, 

Nihonbashi-ku, Tokyo — 
Embroidered silk handkerchiefs. 

35. Nemoto, Sensuke, Minamijim- 

bo-cho, Kanda-ku, Tokyo — 
Embroidery. 

36. Nishida, Kahei, Uyeno-machi, 

Shitaxa-ku, Tokyo — 
Tape. 

37. Nishiha, Yoichiro, Sannomi- 

ya, Kobe — 
Embroidery. 



38. Nishikazva, Genjiro, Shijo Sa- 

kai-machi, Kyoto — 
Tassels, W. 
Tassels, E. 
Tassels, S. 
Tassels, T. 
Tassels, R. 
Tassels, I. 
Tassels, V. 
Tassels, A. 
Tassels, C. 
Tassels, O. 

39. Nishimtira, Sozaycmon, San- 

jo'dori, Kyoto — 
Folding screens. 
Bed spread. 
Screens. 
Tablets. 
Dresses. 
"Fiikusa." 

40. Okanishi, Katsuzo, Kumoi- 

dori, Kobe — 
Embroidery. 

41. Osachi, Kisakii, Kitanagasa- 

dori, Kobe — 
Scalloped handkerchiefs. 
Hemstitched handkerchiefs. 
Shirts. 
Shawls. 

42. Saito, Kotaro, Xagoya — 
Dresses. 

Embroidered table cloth. 
Scallops. 

43. Sakaiy Hanbci, Kagoya — 
Handkerchiefs. 

44. Sata, Kcijiro, Nagoya — 
Stove cover. 

Table cloths. 
Pillow cases. 
Flower vase doilies. 
Handkerchiefs. 



170 



Japanese Exhibition, 



45. Sato, ScntarOy Sakai-cho, Yo- 

kohama — 
Folding screens. 

46. Shibabayashi, Sotaro, Namba 

Sakiiragaiva-cho, Osaka — 
"Naniwa" fabric curtains. 

47. Shibata. Kcijiro, Niigata- 

ken — 
Insertion. 
Lace. 

Centre pieces. 
Handkerchiefs. 

48. Shibata, Matakichi, Hinode- 

cho, Yokohama — 
Handkerchiefs. 
Shawls. 
Table cloth. 
Dresses. 
Folding screens. 

49. Shibata, Matakichi, Kano-cho, 

Kobe — 
Handkerchiefs for ladies. 
Table cloths. 

ladies' dress, foreign style. 
Collars. 

Cuffs for ladies. 
\'est coat. 
Girl's shawl. 

50. Shiiiio, Shobei, Hon-cho, Yo- 

kohama — 
Dresses. 
Dressing sacks. 
Table centre. 
Shawl. 

51. Shiocaki, Yosaburo, Sanno- 

miya, Kobe — 
Embroidery. 

52. Shiocaki, Yiishichi, Kitanaga- 

sa-iiori, Kobe — 
Embroidcrv. 



53. Sowa, KaichirOy Ginza, Kyo- 

bashi-kn, Tok\o — 
Table cloth of gold thread. 
Curtain of gold thread. 
*'Fukusa" of gold thread. 

54. Sugaiva, Kiyoshi, Hon-cho, 

Yokohama — 

Gold thread and silk embroider- 
ies : — 

Lambrequin. 
Table cover. 
Pillow case. 
Chair scarf. 
Curtain. 
Bed spread. 

Lace and drawn work : 

Ladies' waist front. 
Ladies' neckwear. 
Ladies' collar and cuffs. 
Centre piece. 
Doilies. 

55. Siiya Chojiro, Motohama-cho, 

Yokohama — 

Shawls. , 

Embroidered handkerchiefs. 

56. Suya, Kiuhci, SannomiyOy 

Kobe— 

Night gowns. 

Jacket. 

Chemise. 

Shawls. 

Embroidered handkerchiefs for 
ladies. 

Hemmed handkerchiefs for gen- 
tlemen. 

Neck-ties. 

Doilies. • 

Pillow cases. 

Handkerchief cases. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



171 



Shirts. 

Centre pieces. 
Handkerchiefs. 

57. Sti::uki. Kojiro, Suga-cho, 

Asakusa-kti, Tokyo — 
"Fukusa." 
Screen. 
Folding screen. 

58. Takagi, Fukujiro, Imakoji, 

Kyoto — 
Folding screens. 

59. Takahashi, Kansaku, Horai- 

cho, Yokahama — 
Stitched silk handkerchiefs. 
Table cloths. 

60. Takemura, Ito, Hon-cho, Yo- 

kohama — 
Fabric for ladies' dresses. 
Japanese dresses. 
Table cloth. 
Napkin. 
Bed spread. 
Pillow case. 

Pillow cases and pillow. 
Tea cloth. 
Centre pieces. 
Plate doilies. 
Finger bowl doilies. 
Glass doilies. 

61. Tanaka, Rishichi, Karasuma- 

rU'dori Kyoto — 
Folding screens. 
Curtains. 
'*Gaku." 

Bed spread, embroidered. 
Dresses, embroidered. 
Screen of embroidery. 
'*Fukiisa." 
Table cloths. 
Pieces of painted velvet. 



62. Tanaka^ Seishichi, Shichijo- 

dori, Kyoto — 

Bed spread. 

Tapestries. 

Screens. 

"Gaku." 

Pillow cases. 

Table cloth. 

"Fukusa." 

62 A. Tanaka, Seishichi, Shichijo 
Karasumaru, Kyoto — 

Bed spread. 

Tapestries. 

Screens. 

"Gaku." 

Pillow cases. 

Table cloths. 

*Tukusa.'' 

63. Tomojima, Kiujiro, Gifu- 

ken — 

Shawls made of crape. 

64. Torii, Chiyomatsu, Hon-cho^ 

Yokohama — 

Bed spread. 

Curtains. 

Japanese dress. 

Shawl. 

Fabric for blouse. 

Blouse. 

Centre piece. 

Ladies* night gowns. 

Mantel cover. 

Pillow case. 

Tapestry. 

Bed spread. 

Curtains. 

65. Yamamoto, Kcnjiro, Nagoya — 
Embroidery. 



172 



Japanese Exhibition, 



66. Yamamoto, Naojiro, Benten- 

dori, Yokohama — 
Kimono (Japanese costume). 
Centre piece. 
Plate doilies. 
Folding screen. 
Bags. 

Pocketbook. 
Dresses. 
Tapestry. 
Centre piece. 
Plate doilies. 

67. Yamamoto, Shichijiro, Sago- 

\a — 
Embroidery scallops. 
Embroidered plate doily. 
Embroidered shawl. 
Ladies' neckties. 
Chemise. 
Ladies' dresses. 

68. Yamanaka, Shigcjiro,, Repre- 

sentative of the Yamanaka 
Co., Kitahama, Osaka. 

Bags. 

Folding screens. 

69. Yegami, Sadajiro, Nagasaki — 
**Gakir' of embroidery. 

GROUP 59. 

Industries Producms: Wearing 
ApporeL 

(Palace of Mantsfactures.) 

1. Arakaiva, Masujiro, Mushano- 

koji Karasnmani, Kyoto — 
Dress. 

2. "Hakata'' Fabric Association, 

Fttkuoka-ken — 
"Hakata" fabric for vest. 

3. Hattori, Youyemon, Nagoya, 

Aichi'ken — 
Dved fabric. 



4. lida, Shinshichi, Karasumani, 

Takatsiiji, Kyoto — 
Gentleman's Japanese suits. 
Japanese ladies' suits. 

5. lijima, Yeitaro, Sakai-cho, 

Yokoliama — 
^»ight gown of "Habutai." 

6. Ishikazva, Sei\emon, Ben ten- 

dori, Yokohama — 
Night gown of silk. 
Night gown of cotton. 

7. Iwata, Toy 00, Yamashita-cho, 

Yokohama-, — 
Ladies' gowns, 

8. Kitahama, Sanjiuro, Masago- 

cho, Yokohama — 
Dresses. 

9. Kono, Nisaburo, Representa- 

tive of Takuo Shokwai, Kita- 

hawa, Osaka — 
Waterproof fabric for ladies' 

overcoats. 
"Unsai" fabric. 
Fabric for tents. 
Fabric for weadier clothes. 
Ladies' overcoats. 
Silk fabric. 
Overcoat for sailors. 
Gentleman's overcoats. 

10. Matsumoto, Akitsu, Kyoma- 

chi'dori, Osaka — 
Full dress of officials of the 
"Shinnin" rank. 
Hat. 
Sword. 

11. Okabe, Kikutaro, Onoye-cho, 

Yokohama — 
Dresses. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



173 



12. Shibata, Matakichi, Hinode- 

cho, Yokohama — 
Dress of silk, 
^^ight gown of "Kobai" silk. 

13. Stiya, Kiubei Sannomiyaya, 

Kobe — 
Dresses. 

Xight-gown for ladies. 
Night-gown for gentlemen. 

14. Tani, Otoshiro, Benten-dori, 

Yokohama — 
Dress. 

Xight-gown. 
Summer dress of cotton. 
Summer dress. 

15. Yamacaki, Suyekichi, Owari- 

cho, Kyobashi'ku, Tokyo, 
Full dress of the officials of the 

"Chokunin" rank. 
Full dress of the masters of cer- 
emony of the Japanese Im- 
perial household. 

16. Yano, Ushioto, Representative 

of Nippon Waterproof Fab- 
ric Co., Kyomachibori'dori, 
Osaka — 

Overcoat of waterproof *'habu- 
tai." 

Overcoat of waterproof fabric. 

GROUP 60* 

Leather, Boots and Shoest Furs 
'ond Skins* 

(Palace of Mantifactiires.) 

1. Fnjikaica, Ruizo, Taihoku, 

Formosa — 
Hats. 

2. Formosa Hat Manufacturing 

Co., Taihoku, Formosa — 
Hats. 



3. Goto, Takcjiro, Tokyo-fu — 
Deer skin leather. 

4. Hashimoto, Kanejiro, Nishi- 

hama-Kitadori, Osaka — 
White cow skin leather. 
Deer skin leather. 

5. Hirata, Tsunejiro, Motoiivai- 

cho, Kanda-ku, Tokyo — 
Belt. 

6. Ishida, Kamekichi, Junkeima- 

chi, Osaka — 
Leather. 

7. Katagi, Tokumats, Hyo go- 

ken, Kobayashi Ryonosuke, 

Tokyo — 
Leather. 
Painted leather. 

8. Kobayashi, Ryonosuke, Tori- 

Abura-cho, Nihonbashi-ku, 

Tokyo — 
Cuff cases. 
Collar cases. 
Belt. 

9. Kobayashi, Tobei, Tori-Abura- 

cho, Nihonbashi-ku, To- 
kyo — 
Painted leather. 

10. Kogo, Tetsujiro, Omote-machi, 
Honjo-ku, Tokyo — 
Painted leather. 

Ti. Komaki, Bunjiro, Choja-ma- 
chi, Yokohama — 
Hair pins. 
Card cases. 

12. Kumagaye, Taijiro, Wakamat- 
su-cho, Nihonbashi-ku, To- 
kyo — 
Painted leather. 



174 



Japanese Exhibition, 



13. Kumagaye, Uhachi, Yagen- 
, bori, Nihonbashi'kii, To- 
kyo — 

Painted leather and belt. 
Belts. 

14. Matstiganc, Shinjiro, Sotodc- 

jiiachi, Honjo'ku, Tokyo — 
Painted leather. 
Lacquered leather. 

15. Matsushita, Kumatsuchi, Hok- 

kaido — 
Red spread. 
Boa of seal. 

16. Maycda, Shichisabtiro, Hyo- 

gokcn — 
White leather. 

17. Nozawa & Co,, Moto-kyorin- 

chi, Kobe — 
Leather. 

18. Numada, Vukichi, Xishihama, 

Osaka — 
Painted leather. 

19. Ogaki, Isaburo, Hyogokcn — 
Leather. 

20. Ono, YasKJi, Hyogokcn — 
Leather. 

21. Shimidcu, Kisuke, Shinzaimo- 

ku-clio, Xihonbashi-ku, To-' 
k\o — 
\^arions kinds of painted leather. 

22. Taiko Hat and Matting Man- 

ufacturing Co., Byoritsu, 
Formosa — 
Hats. 

23. Takci, Masaji, Taihoku, For- 

mosa — 
Hats. 

24. Uraku, Ushichiro\ Hyogo- 

kcn — 
Leather. 



GROUP 61. 

Vorious Industries G>nnected With 

Qotfains:* 

(Palace ol Manufactisret.) 

1. Arakawa, Masujiro, Ayanoko- 

ji, Karasiimaru, Kyoto — 
Cravats. 
Belt. 

2. Asahi, Goshi Kzcaisha, Kiyo- 

mien, Kyoto — 
Xeck-ties. 

3. Asai, Sckisci, Tachibano-cho, 

. N ihonbashi-ku , Tokyo — 
Artificial flowers for head-dress. 
Brooches. 

4. Baba, Banso {Representative 

of Seisan Hanbai Kobai Ku- 
miai) , Kumamoto-ken — 
Straw braid. 

5. Chikami, Kokiu, Kochi-ken — 
^ Chip braid. 

Mixed braid of shaving and 

straw. 
Braid of straw. 

6. Danscn Seiao Kumiai, Tsu, 

Mi\e-kcn — 
l^'ans. 

7. Fujii, Kinzaburo, Hiroshima- 

ken — 
Straw braid. 

8. Fujii, Nakaiehi, Hiroshima- 

ken — 
Straw braid. 

9. Fujii, Vaoji, Hiroshima-ken — 
Straw braid. 

10. Fujiki, Kaichiro, Kodemma- 
cho, X ihonbashi-ku, Tokyo — 
Fans. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 






II. Fujioka, Gen, Yedobori, Osa- 21. Hayashida, Shiunco, Xagasa- 



ka— 
Knitted stuff. 

12. Fujio, Siiyeji {Representative 



ki'kcn — 
Umbrellas for ladies. 
Umbrellas for gentlemen. 



of the Fujiyama Shokxiai), 22. Hirano, Kiugoro, Tominokoji 



HyogO'ken — 
lUittons. 



Gojo, Kyoto- 
Folding fans. 



13. Geisei, Mugiwarasanada Kojo, '23. Hirata, Tsunejiro, Motoiwai- 

Kochi-ken — 
Straw braid. 

14. Gifu-ken, Karakusa Knmiai. 24. Id::iimi, Sakichi, Bakuro-eho. 



cho, Kanda-ku, Tokyo — 
Cravats. 



Gifu'ken — 
Fancv umbrellas. 
Calico umbrellas. 
Silk umbrellas. 

15. Goto, Yonetaro, Gifii-ken — 
Parasols. 
Fans. 

16. Hamatani Goshi Kivaisha, 

Temmabashi, Osaka — 
Felt hats. 

17. Hanabitsa, Rakutaro, Kochi- 

ken — 
Straw braid. 

17A. Habusa, Sakaye, Kochi-ken — 
Straw braid. 

18. Hanabusa, Tadaichi, Kochi- 

ken — 
Straw braid. 



19. Harafa, Inosuke (Representa- 

tive of the Okayama-ken 

Straw Braid Manufacturers' 

Association ) , 

ken — 
Various kinds of straw braid, 
jjraids of straw, shaving and va- 
rious kinds of glass. 

20. Hattori, Youyemon, Xagoya — 
Straw braid. 



Osaka — 
Stockings. 
Gloves. 
Xeck-ties. 
Tassel for umbrella. 

25. Idzumi, Zenshichi, Gifu, Gifu- 
ken — 

Folding fans. 

26. Igarashi, Katsutaro, Sotode- 
niachi, Honjo-ku, Tokyo — 

Umbrella handles. 
Umbrella handles for lady. 

2j. I ho, Jiutaro, Shiga-ken — 
Folding fans. 

28. lijima, Yeitaro, Sakai-cho, Yo- 
kohama — 
Shirts. 

Night gown of "Habutai." 
Shirts of "Habutai." 
Silk undershirts for ladies. 
Gentlemen's silk stockings. 
Ladies' silk stockings. 

Okayama- 29. Ikeda, Chimataro, Futatsuido, 

Osaka — 
Knitted cotton undershirts. 
Knitted cotton drawers. 

30. Ikeda, Takuzo, Hiroshima- 
ken — 
Straw braid. 



176 



Japanese Exhibition, 



31. Ikcda, Yonekichi, Tachiuri- 

Nishimachi, Kyoto — 
Knitted silk undershirts. 
Knitted silk drawers. 
Knitted woolen shirts. 

32. Inagaki, Masashichi, Minami- 

kiuhoji-machi, Osaka — 
Folding fans. 

33. InouyCy Ginnosnke, Teramachi 

Dike, Kyoto — 
Knitted undershirts. 

34. Inouye, Mohei, representative 

of the Xagoya Ogi Boyeki 
Gumi, Nagoya — 
Folding fans. 

35. Inonye. Sen, Junkei-machi, 

Osaka — 
Umbrellas. 
Sticks. 
Umbrella handles. 

36. Isliii, Katsujiro, Temmabashi- 

SHJi, Osaka — 
Knitted undershirts. 

37. Ishikazva, Seiyetnon, Benten- 

(iori, Yokohama — 
Shirts. 

Cotton crape shirts. 
Silk shirts. 
Silk nightgown. 
Cotton nightgown. 
Cuffs and collars. 

38. Ishhsjara, Ycitaro, Higashino- 

tain. Kyoto — 
Parasols. 

39. Ishhaka, Seishiro, Kumamoto- 

ken — 
Straw braid. 

40. Ishizumi, Kisaburo, Yanagino- 

batiba, Kyoto — 
Folding fans. 



41 . I to, Asagoro, Aichi-ken — 
Chip and straw braid. 
Specimens of chip and straw 

braid. 

42. hvata, Toy 00, Yamashita-cho, 

Yokohama — 
Gentlemen's stockings. 
Ladies' stockings. 
Gentlemen's undershirts. 
Ladies' undershirts. 
Ladies' combination. 
Parasols, Japanese. 
Umbrellas. 

43. Kagawa-ken Straw Braid 

Man ufacturers' Association . 

Kagawa-ken — 
Chip braid. 
Straw braid. 

44. Kamekaiva, Chiukichi, Hiro- 

shima-ken — 
Straw braid. 

45. Kamihara, Kotaro, Hiroshima- 

ken — 
Straw braid. 

46. Kamimura, Shosuke, Minami- 

Kiuhoji-machi, Osaka — 
Artificial flowers. 
Artificial flowers for head dress. 
Basket of artificial flowers. 

47. Kano, Shiuken, Nogoya — 
Folding fans. 

48. Katagiri, Kamakichi, Aichi- 

ken — 
Straw and chip braid. 

49. Kato, Chohei, Gifu-ken — 
Fans. 

50. Kato, Yoshitaro, Nagoya — 
Folding fans. 




International Extosition, St. Louis, 1904. 



"^77 



51. Kazi'oi, Tomiya, Azuchi-machi, 

Osaka — 
Shirts. 

52. Kishida, Makitaro, Hiroshima- 

ken — 
Straw braid. 

53. Kitsu, Kcijiro, Miyc-ken — 
Shaving braid. 

Straw braid. 

Mixed straw and shaving braid. 

54. Koclii'ken, Mugiwarasanada, 

Mohan Kojo, Kochi-ken — 
Shaving braid. 
Straw braid. 
Mixed straw and shaving braid. 

55. Koidcumi, Seizahuro, Hiro- 

shima-ken — 
Straw braid. 

56. Kojinta, Kanshichi, Ota-mac hi, 

Yokohama — 
Umbrellas. 

57. Kono, Masakichi, Kochi-kcn — 
Shaving braid. 

Draid of mixed shaving and 

straw. 
Straw braid. 

58. Koyama, Zcntaro, Okayama- 

ken — 
Specimens of shaving braid. 

59. Kuruyama, Iwakichi, Hiro- 

shima-ken — 
Straw braid. 

60. Kuruyama, Minekichi, Hiro- 

shima-ken — 
Straw braid. 

61. Kyoto Joshi Shugci Gakko, 

Kyoto — 

m 

Pot of artificial cherry flowers. 
Pot of artificial wistaria flowers. 



Pot of artificial pine tree. 
Basket of artificial flowers. 

62. Machida, Kiukichi, N^agasaki- 

ken — 
Umbrellas for gentlemen. 

63. Maki, Katsutaro, Hiroshima- 

ken — 
Straw braid. 

64. Marugame Dansen Goshi 

Kzvaisha, Kagawa-ken — 
Fans. 

65. Matsuyoshi, Kahei, Bingo- 

machi, Osaka — 
Fans. 
Parasols. 

66. May eta, Yoneichiro, Kochi- 

ken — 
Chip braid. 

Mixed braid of chip and straw. 
Straw braid. 

67. Mayeda, Yosihiro, Sabiye-cho, 

Kobe — 
Fans. 

68. Minagazva, Yoshizo, Tomiza- 

zaa-cho, Nihonbashi-ku, To- 
kyo — 

Sticks. 

Umbrella handles. 

Umbrellas. 

69. Misaki, Seitaro, Tachiuri, Hi- 

gashi-machi, Kyoto — 
Artificial flowers. 

70. Mizca, Zenbei, Tachibana-cho, 

Nihonbashi-ku, Tokyo — 
Artificial flowers for ornament. 

71. Miyata, Totaro, Benten-dori, 

Yokohama — 
Folding fans. 
Fans. 



178 



Japanese Exhibition, 



J 2, Morii, Kiichiro, Bukkoji, Ni- 
shmotoin, Kyoto — 
Belt for gentleman. 
Belt for lady. 

73. Mori, Kichiy Tokyo — 
Artificial flowers for electric 

lamp. 

74. Mori, Sakaye, Kochi-ken — 
Shaving braid. 

Mixed braid of shaving and 

straw. 
Straw braid. 

75. Morishita, Scibci, Kitahoriye- 

Shimodori, Osaka — 
Knitted undershirts. 
• Knitted drawers. 

76 — Murakami, A tsiishi, Marti- 
yama, Kyoto — 
Folding fans. 
Fans. 

yy, Aichi'kcn Straw Braid Asso- 
ciation — 
Straw and shaving braid. 
Specimens of straw and shaving 
braid. 

78. Xagono, Mototaro, Omotejin- 

hocho, Kanda-ku, Tokyo — 
Sleeve buttons. 
Brooches. 

79. Xakagazca, Sataro, Sanjo-Ha- 

shi-Higashi, Kyoto — 
Cotton undershirts and drawers. 
I'ndershirts. 
Todies' undershirts. 
Cotton stockings. 

80. Xakai, Shoten, Sannomiya, 

Kobe — 
Parasols. 
Fans. 



81. Nakamura, Genzo, Nagoya — 
Folding fans. 

82. Nakamura, Sosukc, Tachi- 

bana-cho, Nihonbashi-kUy 
Tokyo — 
Umbrella handles. 

83. Xakao, Ihci, Minami-Kinhoji- 

machi, Osaka — 
Fancy parasols. 
Stove screen. 
Parasols. 

84. Xishiyama, Masujiro, Hiro- 

shima-ken — 
Straw braid. 

85. Xissei-Kzi'an, Hyogo-ken — 
Chests of drawers. 

86. Xnmakura, Kogoro, Odemma- 

shizvo-cho, Xihonbashi-ku, 
Tokyo — 
**Karakusa." 

87. Ogata, Magoyemon, Hiroshi- 

ma-ken — 
Straw braid. 

88. Ogata, Yoshisuke, Hiroshima- 

ken — 
Straw braid. 

89. Okito, Kotaro, Hiroshima- 

ken — 
Straw braid. 

()o. Okutani, Shobei, Osaka- fu — 
Shaving braid. 
Straw braid. 
Shaving material. 

gt, Okutsu, Fukumatsu, Yoko- 
hama — 
Shaving braid.- 

92. Okasaki, Kiiitaro, Kochi-ken — 
Straw braid. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



179 



93. Onishi, Vo, Gifti-ken — 
Fans. 

94. Osaka Dansen Seizo Goshi 

Kwaisha, Unagidani-Naka- 
machi, Osaka — 
Fans. 

95. Osazva, Kametaro, Benten- 

dori, Yokohama — 
Parasols. 
Umbrellas. 

96. Otaira, Motosabnro, Hiro- 

shima-ken — 
Straw braid. 

97. Sakamoto, Josaku, Kochi- 

ken — 
Straw braid. 

98. Sakamoto, Tomoshichi, Mina- 

midemma-cho, Kyobashi-ku, 

Tokyo — 
Umbrellas. 
Sticks. 

99. Sakata, Bunsuke, Tominokoji 

Takatsnji, Kyoto — 
Folding fans. 
Fans. 

100. Sakata, Okizo, Hiroshima- 

ken — 
Straw braid. 

10 1. Sakurai, Yeiso, Sukiya-cho, 

Shitaya-ku, Tokyo — 
Sleeve buttons. 
Pins. 

102. Sanuki Seisan Dogyo Kii- 
miai, Kagaxva-ken — 

Parasols. 

103. Sensu Shokwai, Kyoto-fu — 
Folding fans. 



104. Shibata, Matakichi, Hinode- 

cho, Yokohama — 
Shirts. 

Ladies' vests. 
Ladies' shirts. 
Ladies' collars. 
Girls' collars. 
Collars for old ladies. 
Cuffs for ladies. '• 

Shawl. n 

Fans. 

105. Shibata, Matakichi, Kano- 

mac hi, Kobe — 
Fans. 

106. Shimoda, Kozo, Kumamoto- 
'ken — 

Straw braid. 

107. Soga, Rikichi, Kochi-ken — 
Shaving braid. 

Braid of mixed shaving and 

straw. 
Straw braid. 

I 

108. Sugano, Shinsaku, Toyama- 

ken — 
Shaving braid. 

109.- Sugawa, Kiyoshi, Hon-cho, 
Yokohama — 
Linen neckties. 

Specimens of collars and cuffs. 
Specimens of insertion. 

no. Sunamoto, Fukumatsu, Ka- 
wara-jnachi, Osaka — 
Sticks. 
Umbrella handles. 

III. Suya, Kiuhci, Sannomiya, 
Kobe- 
Parasols, 
Fans. 



i8o 



Japanese Exhibition, 



112. Suzuki, Kojiro, Suga-cho, 

Asakusa-ku, Tokyo — 

Folding fans. 

Fans. 

Artificial flowers. 

113. Tachibana Gun Straw and 
Sharing Braid Association, 
Kanagawa-ken — 

Shaving braid. 

114. Taige, Kaichiro, Hiroshima- 

ken — 

Straw braid. 

115. Takebc, Jiunzo, Kakayamate- 

dori, Kobe — 

Parasols. 

116. Takci, Shirui, Goshi Kwai- 
sha, Gifu'ken — 

Small fans. 

Round folding fans. 

117. Takcmura, I to, Hon-cho, Yo- 

kohama — 

Collars and cuflFs. 
Sailors' collars. 

118. Tanabc, Ichiji, Kochi-kcn — 
Shaving braid. 

Mixed brand of shaving and 

straw. 
Straw braid. 

• 

119. Tanaka. Scikichi, Nagasumi- 
cho, Asaktisa-ku, Tokyo — 

Fans. 

120. Tani, Otoshiro, Bcntcn-dori, 

]\okohama — 

Silk jackets. 

Shirts of "Habutai." 

Cotton crape shirts. 



121. Teikoku Seibo Kabushiki 
Kivaisha, Shizuoka-ken — 

Hats. 

122. Tcshigaivara, Goshi, Kwai- 
sha, Gifti'kcn — 

F'ans. 

Fanc>' parasols. 

123. Tokyo-fu Vebara-Gun Strazc 
Braid Association, Takvo- 
fu- 

Shaving braid. 

124. Toraki, Hikotaro.Kanagawa- 

ken — 
Shaving braid. 
Shaving braid set in frame. 
Materials of shaving. 

125. Uta, Hikosaburo, Hiroshinui- 

ken — 
Straw braid. 

126. IVaida, Kaichi, Amijima, 
Osaka — 

Cotton crape shirts. 

127. Vagi, Fukumatsu, Tosabori- 
Urantachi, Osaka — 

Undershirts and drawers for 
summer. 

Undershirts for summer. 

Undershirts and drawers for win- 
ter. 

128. Yamada, Kiujiro, representa- 
tive of Osaka Artificial 
Flozver Traders' Association, 
Minami - Kiuhoji - machi. 
Osaka — 

Artificial flowers. 

129. Yamada, Nizo, Aichi-ken — 
Straw and shaving braids. 
Specimens of straw and shaving 

braids. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



181 



130. Vamaguchi, Heisaburo, Aioi- 
cho, Yokohama — 

Shaving braid. 

131. Yamofiaka, Shigejiro, repre- 
sentative of Yamanaka Shok- 
zvai, Kitahama, Osaka — 

Artificial flowers. 



132. Yainashita, Tomekichi, Hiro- 
shima-ken — 

Straw braid. 

133. Yoshii, MoyemoHy Kitahama, 

Osaka — 

Folding fans. 



1 82 



Japanese Exhibition, 



CHAPTER V. 



Department of Machinery. 



All the Exhibiti of thii Department Are ImtaUed in Japanese 

Electridty Building. 



in the 



Exhibits, 



GROUP 62. 

Steom En8:fnes* 

I. Shibaura Works of Mitsui 
& Co,, Tokio — 

Model of Mivabara's water tube 
steam boiler. 

GROUP 64. 
General Mochinery* 

1. Ashimori, Biihei, Osaka — 
Cotton rope. 

2. Fukiioka, Masaro, Tokio — 
Belts. 



3. Hyakko Co., Tokio — 
Fire extinguisher. 

4. Nitta, Chojiro, Osaka — 
Belts. 

Packing. 
Picker. 

5. Sakatic, Mango, Osaka — 
Belts. 

GROUP 65* 
Machine Tools* 

I. Piikushima, Voshitaro, 
kio — 
Files. 



To- 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



183 



CHAPTER VI. 
Department of Electricity. 



Exhibits. 



GROUP 61. 



Machines for Generating and Usin? 

Electricity* 

1. Shihaura Works of Mitsui & 

Co,, Tokio — 

Kishi's direct coupled continuous 
current dvnamo and steam en- 
gine. 

Coil for magnetic field of dy- 
namo. 

2. Shihaura Works of Mitsui & 

Co., Tokio — 

lijima's extra high tension trans- 
former for testing 150,000 
volts. 

GROUP 70* 
TelesrapHy and Telephony* 

I. Oki Co., Tokio — 

Morse's ink writer. 

Double current key., 

DerviKs telephone transmitter. 

Solid back telephone transmitter. 

Iwata*s telephone transmitter. 

Table telephone. 

Self-restoring annunciation drop. 

Double-wire simple standard 

switch board. 
Cables. 

Paraffin wires. 
Wires. 
Subscriber's receiver cords. 



Telephone operator's receiver 
cords. 

Transmitter cords. 

Double core plag cords, white. 

Double core plag cords, red. 

Three core table telephone. 

Transmitter cords. 

Five core table telephone trans- 
mitter cords. 

GROUP 7L 
Various Applications of Electricity* 

1. Japan Electric Association, 

Tokio — 
Table of electric industry in 
Japan. 

2. Kioto City Council, Kioto — 
Photographs of canal route with 

water power electric plant. 
Plan of the same. 
History of the same. 

3. Oki & Co., Tokio — 
Wheatstone's bridge. 
Tangent galvanometer. 
Differential galvanometer. 
Asiatic galvanometer. 
Tsuboi's block instrument. 

4. Saiga, Tokichi, Kioto — 
Models of water power electric 

plant in lyo. 
Photographs of the same. 

5. Tanaka & Co., Tokio — 
Electric medical instrument. 



184 Japanese Exhirition, 



CHAPTER VIT. 
Department of Transportation. 

Introductory Remarks, 

L Post 

A system of **post station" originated in Japan in the ancient times. 
Official documents and treasures were transmitted bv this means. Dur- 

w 

ing the three centuries of military rule of the Tokugawa family after 
the beginning of the Seventeenth Century, this system of communi- 
cation attained a considerable degree of perfection, postal stations hav- 
ing been established throughout the country. The restoration of the 
Imperial Government marks another era of the advancement of this 
means of communication, it was, however, in the year 1870, that the 
Government inaugurated a new postal system, which, though crude, 
was modeled after the Western post service. In accordance with the 
new system, a post office was established in each of the three metro- 
ix)litan cities, Tokyo, Saikyo, and Osaka; post stamps were issued, 
and post boxes were placed in every important place. The three post 
offices were soon followed by five more offices distributed among five 
ports. In March, 1872, mails were delivered thrice a day for the first 
time in Tokyo. In April of the next year, a uniform rate of postage 
was adopted throughout the country with a certain distinction between 
urban and rural deliveries. In December of the same year, postal 
cards were issued. A system of postal money order was adopted in 
January, 1874. In the succeeding year a postal savings system was 
adopted. 

Previous to 1882, two different rates of postage were in practice 
for the urban and rural deliveries ; but at the end of that vear such 
distinction was entirely abolished, adopting an absolutely uniform rate. 
In 1886, the post office was united with the telegraph office; in 1892, 
parcel post was inaugurated : in 1903, a regulation for transmitting 
mail matter by railroad or vessel was enacted. We may safely say 
that at present the postal service of Japan is inferior to that of no other 
countrv. 



International Exposition. St. Louis, 1904. 



i8s 



The following table gives some idea of the growth of our postal 

service during the four years following 1898: 

v#».r *»wi't!ii Po«t Sub- «r°i« Mail P. O. 

""""• *"oS?e^^ o«--- «t-tion. ,S?s"Si, ^ox. Box. 

1899 1,200 2,612 651 39,351 40,230 953 

1900 1,338 2.586 894 41.499 42.5^6 980 

1901 1,446 2.605 1,069 43,106 44,509 I,I2.S 

1902 1597 2,556 1,362 45.192 469.932 1.078 



The number of private boxes is comparatively small, as the de- 
livery of mails is very frequent in Japan. 

The following table shows the total mileage of postal routes for 
the four years from 1899 to 1902, inclusive : 

' Ordinary Mail. . Post Parcel. > 

Ordinary Rail- Water- Ordinary Rail- Water- 

road, road. way. road. load. way. 

1899 . . 12,018.28 3,580.71 25,820.32 10,419.83 3.580.71 10,029.75 

1900.. 12,340.72 3,817.67 13,849.00 II. 162.40 3,817.67 12.608.00 

1901 .. 12.586.94 4,029.78 18,843.50 12,241.50 4,029.78 18,84350 

1902.. 12,824.19 4,217.47 17,109.20 12,532,97 4,217.46 17,109.20 

Again, the following table shows the number of various mail 
matter dealt with by the post office: 

Newspapers and Books and 

Year. Letters. Cards. Periodicals. Pamphlet*;. 

1899 I55»686,922 334.023,258 1 10,073,373 8.095.574 

1900 180,232,462 399.529031 135.3-26.547 9.726,431 

1901 196,515,449 442,093,231 141,700.982 9,206,821 

1902 213,956.370 488,890,747 150,553.746 9.982,333 

No. Mail Matters. Post 
Year. Others. Total. per capita. Parcels. 

1899 22,014,688 629,893.815 13.57 6,018,01 1 

1900 26.319,006 751.133.978 15.99 7.759.162 

1901 31.975.315 821,491.798 1709 9.885,590 

1902 39,378,846 902,701,042 18.54 10,419,693 

The first foreign mail service of Japan was opened by the con- 
clusion of the Postal Convention between the United States of America 
and Japan in 1873, previous to which our communications with foreign 
countries were carried on by the postal agencies of Great Britain, the 
United States and France. In 1876, the Government established a 
post office at Shanghai, opening a regular mail route between that port 
and Yokohama. Shortly later, another Japanese post office was es- 
tablished in Korea. It was in March, 1877, that Japan entered the 
International Postal Union. 



i86 



Japanese Exhibition, 



At first, the foreign mail service had been limited to the three 
kinds of mail matters, /. r., letters, newspapers, and books. In 1875, 
general printed matters and samples of merchandise were added to 
the above list. Again, the postal cards and commercial papers began 
to be dealt with in the foreign mail ser^fice in 1877 and 1880 respectively. 

The growth of the foreign mail service of Japan since 1899 is 
shown in the following table: 

Year. Dispatches. Arrivals. 

1899 • 3,428,042 3,221,323 

1900 5,379»9ai 6,383,666 

1901 6,520.699 7,140,960 

1902 6,776,575 7.010,517 

The foreign parcel post service was first opened in 1879, when an 
agreement was concluded with Hongkong, which was followed by an 
agreement with Canada, in 1890. In 1894 and 1896, a similar agree- 
ment was made with Germany and England respectively. The parcel 
post agreement was concluded with the United States of America in 
the present year. 

The number of post parcels dispatched abroad or arriving in Japan 
for the four years following 189Q is shown in the following two tables : 

Dispatches. 

Year. Canada. Germany. England. France. Hongkong. Total. 

1899 304 358 4.186 502 ... 5»350 

1900 391 678 3,.S05 580 ... 5.154 

1901 420 980 4,892 677 . . . 6,969 

1902 1,422 496 6,869 483 135 10,485 

Arrivals. 

Year. Canada. Germany. England. France. Hongkong. Total. 

1899 291 1,816 5,225 1,093 ■ •■ 8,425 

1900 378 3,070 6,225 1,229 ... io,90J 

1901 303 2.50S 5.515 M4-' ••• 9*468 

1902 518. 4,593 6,568 1,263 715 13,656 

The postal money order .service has been practiced s^nce 1875. ^'^ 
1879, the foreign postal money order service was first opened as the 
result of an agreement with Hongkong for the exchange of postal 
money orders. This was followed by similar agreements with Eng- 
land, France and the United States of America. In 1885, Japan joined 
the International Postal Money Order l/nion, and in 1889 another 
agreement of the same nature was concluded with Canada. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 187 

The following two tables show the growth of our postal money 
order service since its inauguration: 

Domestic Order. 

No. of No. of Amount of 

Year. Offices. .\pplications. Money. 

1875 222 115703 2,123,146 

1881 678 489.568 7,655.202 

1891 2,122 2,605,116 20,715,040 

1901 5fi23 7.661,919 . 88,062,519 

Foreign Order. 

1875 

1881 129 1,894 41 1,070 

1891 2,432 64,729 2,980 109,270 

1901 6,994 189,256 40,917 2,954,635 

//. Telegraph, 

The first telegraph service ever inaugurated in Japan was that 
between Tokyo and Yokohama. By the year 1885, main telegraph 
lines were well-nigh extended to all parts of the country. This ex- 
pansion of telegraph service necessitated the revision of the Telegraphic 
Service Regulations, in May of the same year, which adopted a uniform 
rate of fee throughout the country, irrespective of distance. In 1890, 
the mileage of telegraph routes was greatly enlarged, and cables were 
laid, connecting main islands which compose Japan proper. The cable 
service was soon extended to minor islands belonging to Japan. Mean- 
while, telegraph lines attached to the railroads were vastly extended to 
be utilized by the public. According to the statistics of 1902, the total 
mileage of telegraph routes stood at 6,610 ri, telegraph lines, 32,258 ri; 
the number of postal telegraph offices, 1,592; telegraph offices, 30; 
postal telegraph sub-stations, 565 ; and the total mileage of cable lines, 
2,130. 

The following table shows the development of our telegraphic 

serv'^ice since 1871 : 

No. of Mileage Mileage 

Year. offices. routes (ri). lines (ri). 

1871 4 19 19 

1881 ; 169 1,871 4,666 

1891 : . 524 3.244 9,245 

1901 1,856 7.361 31.170 

After the completion of a telegraph line between Tokyo and 
Nagasaki, in 1873, the Japanese telegraph offices accepted foreign 



i88 J M'AXESE Exhibition, 

telegrams, but, at that time, as our country had not vet joined the 
International Telegraph Convention, it could have no direct communi- 
cation with foreign countries : the transmission of messages was lim- 
ited within the boundaries of the Empire, all communication beyond 
Nagasaki being entrusted to the Great Northern Telegraph Company, 
of Denmark, which laid cables between Nagasaki, Shanghai and Vladi- 
vostock in 1870. Since March, 1878, however, all international com- 
munications have been transmitted directly by our telegraph offices, in 
conformity with the stipulations of the International Telegraph Con- 
vention. In 1879, J^P^" promulgated the International Telegraphic 
Union Treaty which went into effect in January, 1880. 

In 18S2, Japan induced the Great Northern Telegraph Company 
to add new cables connecting Nagasaki with Shanghai on one hand 
and Vladivostock on the other. Following the acquisition of Formosa, 
the Government laid a cable between that island and Fuchow. China, 

The following table shows the number of dispatches and arrivals 
of foreign telegrams for four years: 

No. of No. of 

Year. dispatches. arrivals. . 

1899 196,561 205,717 

1900 273,924 294,085 

1901 353.624 382.438 

1902 399,348 426,268 

///. Telephone. 

The first long-distance telephone Japan has ever possessed was 
that which was constructed between Tokvo and Yokohama in Novem- 
ber, 1877. In 1888, another line was opened between Tokyo and Atami, 
which was shortly afterward extended to Shizuoka. In 1889, Tokyo 
and Osaka were connected by a new line. In the following year, the 
service was opened to the people at large in Tokyo and Yokohama and 
between the two cities. The service was opened in Osaka and Kobe 
in 1893; "^ Kyoto in 1897; in Sakai and Nagoya in 1898. The tele- 
l)hone service is undertaken by the Government exclusively. 

The following table shows the growth of telephone service since 
1899: 

Tele- Tele- Auto- Naked Under- 

phone phone matic Overhead Overhead srround 

Bxch. Call Call Sub- Wires. Cables. Cables. 

Year. Offices. Office.s. Offices, scribers. (ri.) (r».) irt.) 

1899 20 52 I 11,813 11,703.83 2,837.86 3»594-5I 

1900 25 70 4 18,668 14,225.75 4»367.3i 7.518.00 

1 901 25 112 67 24,887 15,487.06 5,053-50 14,694.08 

1902 29 151 134 29,941 17.T13.41 6,599.42 19,618.84 



International Exposition, St. Louis. 1904. 189 

IV, Railroads. 

The first railroad of Japan was constructed by the Government 
between Tokvo and Yokohama in 1872. This was soon followed bv 

% 

greater undertakings of the Government as well as of private capital- 
ists. The rapid growth of the mileage of the railroads in Japan is 
shown in the following table : 

Government Private 
Railways. Railways. Total. 

Year. (Mile.) (Mile.) (Mile.) 

1^7^ 18.00 18.00 

1877 65.11 65.11 

1882 170.66 176.66 

^^7 300.43 293.24 59367 

1892 550.49 1,220.28 1,870.77 

1897 661.65 2,287.05 2,948.70 

190-2 1,104.52 2,915.40 4,020.12 

All the railroads of Japan are of a narrow guage of three feet six 
inches. At first, rails, locomotive engines and cars were all im- 
ported : but soon afterward the Bureau of Railway Construction of the 
Government successfully undertook the manufacture of locomotives 
and cars. This example was quickly followed by private factories 
at Kobe, Omiya, Hiogo, and several other places. Rails are not manu- 
factured by any private factories, but the Government iron foundry 
has been producing them for some time to a considerable volume. 

Electric railways have been constructed in several important towns. 
Tramways are also in use. The following table shows the growth 
cf ihese two means of transportation : 

No. of Amount of Length 
Year. Company, capital. of routes (ri). 

1899 15 ' 3.326,050 .44.25 

1900 16 3,923,560 44.16 

1901 18 5,475.165 76.44 

1902 30 7,515,444 .106.38 

Beside the electric railways and tramwavs shown in the above 
table, a considerable mileage of electric railways has been added in 
Tokyo and other important cities during the last and the current year. 



190 Japanese ExHiniTiox. 

Many kinds of carriages are also in use, assisting greatly in 
facilitating the means of transportation. They are shown in the 
following table: 



Year. 


Drawn by Horse. 
For 
Riding. Wagon. 


Cart 

Drawn by 

Man. 


WairoB 

Drawn by 

Man. 


Wasron 

Drawn by 

Ox. 


others. 


Total. 


1899 


5,282 


82.616 


208,032 


1,332,012 


31,992 


22,126 


1 ,682,060 


1900 


6,104 


90,103 


205,390 


1 ,322,309 


30,501 


31,594 


1,686,001 


19OI 


6,595 


97,096 


200,991 


1,334,373- 


22,680 


59,616 


1,721,351 


1902 


6,800 


92,389 


195.771 


1,335,838 


28,308 


57,355 


1,716,461 



V. 1 Voter Transportation. 

JJeing surrounded by seas and oceans and richly furnished by 
rivers and streams, Japan has naturally developed means of water 
transportation from the ancient times. Except for the exclusive 
and inclusive policy enforced by the Tokugawa Government during the 
Middle Ages, our maritime navigation would have been advanced to 
a much greater extent. After the restoration of the Imperial Govern- 
ment, the shipping traffic of Japan suddenly commenced to prosper with, 
remarkable rapidity. The coasting trade and inland water service of 
Japan has been carried on exclusively by native companies. A large 
number of Japanese vessels are plying regularly between our ports and 
.•all the important ports of the Asiatic Continent and Australia, and 
Europe and America. 

The following table shows the total number and gross tonnage of 
registered Japanese vessels for six years: 

Steam Ship. Sailing Ship. 

No. of No. of 

Year. • ships. Tonnage. ships. Tonnage. 

1897 175 426,624 69 27,412 

1898 202 464,246 635 149,385 

1899 261 458.376 1,752 270,162 

1900 349 534,239 2,201 306,393 

1901 427 577,195 2,362 324.995 

1902 479 604,627 2,348 328,192 

Beside the registered vessels given in the above table, there were 
950 unregistered steamships and sailing ships of modern style, with 
a total tonnage of 32,873: 18,743 sailing vessels of native style with a 
freight capacity of 2,351,950 koku: and 626,611 smaller vessels. 

According to the statistics of 1902, the total number of licensed 
officers for foreign-shaped ships stood at 16,310, of which 587 and 405 
were captains and chief engineers respectively. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



191 



As to the nautical signals of Japan, the statistics of 1902 enumeiates 
Government signals as follows : 1 10 light houses ; 5 light poles ; 2 
light-ships; 2 guide lights: 27 floating marks; 14 standing marks; i 
shore mark, and 12 alarm signals. Private signals in the same year 
comprised 6 light houses and 9 standing marks. 

Keeping pace with the development of marine transportation, the 
art of shipbuilding has been remarkably improved during recent years. 
The first shipyard built after the Western method was installed by the 
Government soon after it bought a Western steamer in i860. Since 
that time private shipyards have been steadily increasing until i;i 1902 
their total number stood at 186, including both large and small estab- 
lishments. The larger shipyards of these are able to build ships of a 
tonnage of six or seven thousand each. Besides these private estab-_ 
lishments, there are at present three Government shipyards, which are 
exclusively devoted to the making of war vessels and ordinary ships 
to be used by the Government. The total number of ships, large and 
small, built at private shipyards, was estimated at 238, with a gross 
tonnage of 28,554. 



Exhibits, 



GROUP 72. 
Cam asfcs and Wheelwrisfhts' Work« 

I. Yamada, Takuso, Osaka — 

Perambulators (installed in Jap- 
anese Section, Palace of Man- 
ufactures). 

GROUP 74. 

Roilways : Yardst StationSt Freisfht 

Houses^ Terminal Facilities 

of AU Kinds. 

I. The Imperial Bureau of Post 
and Telegraph, Tokio — 

Table showing the progress of 

postal service during the last 

ten vears. 
Table showing the progress of 

the telegraph service during 

the last ten years. 



Table showing the progress of 
the telephone service during 
the last ten vears. 

Table showing the progress of 
the postal money order busi- 
ness during the last ten years. 

Table showing the progress of 
the post office saving bank 
business during the last ten 
vears. 

Map of the telegraph and tele- 
phone lines. 

Map of the postal routes. 

Postal routes map. 

Postal route atlas. 

Table showing the postage 
stamps in use at present. 

Table of the postal cards and 
envelopes in use at present. 



192 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Table of the pass books and 
forms for stamp deposit used 
at present in the post office sav- 
ing bank business. 

Models of postman and mail car- 
riers' articles used for carrv- 
ing mails. 

Pictures of post offices and their 
interior, 

2. Imperial Raihaay Bureau, To- 
kio — 
Railway map of Japan. 
The statistics of railways in 

Japan. 
Chart of passenger and freight 
services of railways in Japan. 
The growth of the Japanese rail- 
ways. 

GROUP 75* 

Matetial ond Equipment Used in 
the Mercantile Morine* 

1. Hasega'ica, Kiyosaburo, To- 

kio — 
Lamps for the use of ships. 
Safety lamps. 

2. Imperial Mercantile Marine 

Bureau, Tokio — 

Chart showing the principal 
steamship lines subsidized by 
the Imi>erial Japanese Govern- 
ment. 

Chart of the tonnage of the mer- 
cantile marine in Japan at 
every third year from 1872 to 
1902. 

Chart showing the station of 
lighthouses, etc. 

Diagram of Taisei Maru, new 
training ship of the Japyanese 
Government Nautical College. 



Folding screen, with photographs 
of lighthouses; tlie Imperial 
Nautical College, and the com- 
parative figures representing 
the progress of the holders of 
the certificates of competency 
for masters, mates and engin- 
eers of the mercantile marine 
in Japan. 

Model of the Midzunokojima 
lighthouse. 

History of marine transportation. 

3. Nippon Yusen Kwaisha 
{Japan Mail Steamship 
Co.), Tokio — 
Table of tonnage of the com- 
pany's steamships. 
Table of the extended knots of 

the periodical steamships. 
Models of the company's steam- 
ships. 
Tablets of the navigation routes. 
Maps. 

Reception room. 

This room has been fitted up ac- 
cording to designs prepared by Mr. 
Jimbei Kawashima, artist to the Im- 
perial household. The fabrics used 
are from his looms in Kyoto, and 
the carvings, lacquers, castings, 
etc., have been executed by the best 
artificers in each line under the su- 
perintendence of Mr. Kawashima. 
The highest style of Japanese 
architecture is here combined with 
European forms. 

There are three styles in Japanese 
architecture, corresponding with 
the three kinds of script, th6 severe, 
the ornate and the current, each of 
which has numerous modifications. 



r 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



193 



In this building the fashion adopted 
is not in strict accord with the se- 
vere style, but is rather a combina- 
tion of the ornate and the current 
among the severe style, care being 
taken that the ensemble shall be 
harmonious. As to the shape of 
the room, the only point to be ob- 
served is that the four corners are 
rounded in order that dust may not 
accumulate. It is in the decoration 
that special features present them- 
selves. 

The whole conception is based on 
representations of the chrysanthe- 
mum and catalpa, with which are 
interspersed pictures of plants, 
flowers, birds, insects, etc., as 
painted by Japan's great artist, 
Jakuchyu, and the composition 
aims at harmony of color and con- 
gruity of motives. 

In the frame-work of the ceiling 
there is not a single timber that 
passes all through from end to end. 
The whole is made up of small tim- 
bers put together in different ways, 
yet so compactly and skillfully that 
the effect produced is as of single 
long pieces. In fact, the work is 
so deftly done that in point of solid- 
ity it can compare with an arch 
formed of stone or brick. 

The whole surface is divided into 
thirty hexagonal coffers, each fram- 
ing a picture of numerous flowers 
embroidered on silk from designs 
by Jakuchyu. 

The original of these pictures are 
from a famous album of flowers 
preserved among the heirlooms of 



a temple in Kyoto. To reproduce 
such designs in embroidery so that 
not a touch of the artist's brush or 
a shade of his colors shall be lost 
in the copy, is the pride of Japanese 
embroiderers, and constitutes a feat 
that has deservedly won universal 
applause. 

The frames that divide the ceil- 
ing into hexagons are made of 
white cedar covered with aven- 
turine lacquer ; the so-called Nashi- 
ji, or "pear-skin ground," which is 
the most recherche of its kind in 
Japan. It is used here with the 
idea that its glitter suggests a host 
of stars sparkling overhead. The 
joints of the frames are tied with 
metal caps on which figures of 
chrysanthemums are chiseled. 

The Cornice, — The top of the 
wall is covered with embroidery, 
the design being an arabesque of 
chrysanthemums on a gold ground, 
after a fashion adopted for decora- 
tive purpose at the Imperial Court. 

The Upper Compartments of the 
walls are occupied by gilded fret 
work of thinly cut wood. 

The IVall is covered with silk 
damask, having a design of chry- 
santhemums and catalpas on a dull 
gold ground. 

The Consoles at the comer are 

m 

made of camphor wood with carved 
chrysanthemum leaves, suggesting 
the presence of the plants. 

The Shafts and Tie-Beams. — The 
shafts and the horizontal tie-beams 
are made of catalpa wood, the 
joints being gilt, and carrying a 



L 



194 



Japanese Exhibition, 



decorative design of vine-pattern 
( lye podium clavat um). These 
vines are emblems of purity and 
cleanliness founded on a traditional 
belief that in early days before the 
dawn of the Empire of Japan a 
goddess entwined herself with these 
leaves, and played a dance to amuse 
a goddess in the sovereign. 

4. Kamiya, Kimhci, Osaka — 
Life buoy, life belt. 

5. Kinugasa, Koshichi, Osaka — 
Life buoy, life belt. 

6. Japanese Society for Sa^'ing 

Life and Property from 
Shipwrecks, Tokio — 
Diagram of the organization of 

the society. 
Chart showing the effect of 

works of the society. 
Map of the situation of life sav- 
ing stations. 



7. Osaka Chamber of Commerce, 
Osaka — 

Tlie exhibition of the Osaka 
Chamber of Commerce consists of 
the following three groups of arti- 
cles: 

First — A miniature topograph- 
ical representation of the Empire 
of Japan, correct and complete to 
the minutest details, showing the 
cities, towns, valleys, mountains, 
seaports, harbors, docks and light- 
houses, and railroad, telegraph and 
telephone lines of Japan, as well as 
her routes of coasting trade, and to 
the neighboring countries. 

Second — ^An elaborately embroid- 
ered map of the world, showing the 
steamship routes between foreign 
countries and the Empire of Japan. 

Third — Framed photographs of 
174 views in Japan. 



International Exposition^ St. Louis, 1904. 195 



CHAPTER VIII. 
Department of Agriculture. 

Introductory Remarks, 

Except in the case of official exhibits, our exhibits in this depart- 
ment were presented by the worthiest agricultural producers by the 
appointment of the Commission. The exhibits are limited to those 
articles which have special relation to the foreign trade of Japan. 

General Remarks, — As the natural result of the peculiar geo- 
graphical position of Japan, our system of agriculture presents diverse 
features according to places, and the natural tendency to di- 
versity was further enhanced by the division of the country during the 
pre-Restoration days into a large number of practically independent 
communities. The consequence is that while in some districts seri- 
culture is predominant, in others tea is the most important product, 
while still others have sugar or other products as the staple farm 
produce. Stock farming is as yet comparatively backward, though the 
rearing of live stock for tillage or draught work is carried on to no 
small extent in some districts. Generally speaking, our farming is 
of intensive cultivation carried on in a small scale. 

Classification of Arable Land. — The gross area of our arable land 
is 6,120,519 cho, which can be divided as follows, according to uses: 

(Cho.) 

Wet fields 2,748,575 

Upland fields, including 2,296,698 

Mulberry fields 222,731 

Tea plantations .3Ij889 

Plains and pastures 1,075,246 

The whole area of the arable land of Japan is only 15.7 per cent 
of the whole area of the Empire (exclusive of Formosa). On the 
other hand, the area of wet and upland fields which amounts to 
5,045,2; 3 cho corresponds to only 12.9 per cent of the whole country. 
The comparative smallness of arable land is solely due to the hilly 
nature of our country. 

Character of Arable Land. — The cultivation of rice being the prin- 
cipal item in the work of our farmers, the greater part of the arable 
land consists of rice fields which often occupy places situated in low 
and wet places and not quite suited for other crops. Of these rice fields 
30 per cent admits of raising a second crop after the harvesting of 



196 Japanese Exhibition, 

the rice. Upland fields are to be found on the other hand in elevated 
places where the drainage is good. In districts which are very densely 
populated or where special agricultural products are to be raised, even 
the slopes of the hills are utilized for upland farming. 

Irrigation and Drainage, — Irrigation and drainage being indis- 
pensable for the cultivation of rice, provisions for facilitating them 
have been made since ancient times. The water used for irrigation is 
either led from rivers or procured by storing rain-water in reservoirs. 
The usual mode of irrigation for rice fields consists in leading the water 
into the said fields till it has accumulated there in a sheet suitable in 
depth and volume. The farm is therefore made very level and is en- 
circled by boundary walls 30 to 35 centimetres in height. While the 
water is led into the farm from an elevation, it is made at the same time 
to flow out by an outlet provided at the other end of the farm. The 
other crops receiving irrigation are generally cotton, indigo and sugar 
cane, and the irrigation for them consists in leading water into the 
spaces between the ridges, and causing it to remain there until it soaks 
through. 

Some Important Arrangements. — Of •the improved arrangements 
of farming, those that are generally carried out are the readjustment 
of farm boundaries, and the improvement of the drainage, irrigation, 
surface coating of the soil, etc. 

Mode of Utilization of Arable Land. — Arable land is utilized ic* 
the greatest extent as rice fields, next to Which come upland farms, in- 
cluding tea plantations and mulberry fields. Pastures are very scarce, 
and are owned by the Ciovernment for experimental purposes and by a 
limited number of stock farmers. 

Though the utilization of land as rice fields is so universal, diese 
fields are, however, far from being utilized as they ought to be, to the 
utmost extent, chiefly owing to the fact that they are not so largely 
used for raising the second crop of the year. It is only in Formosa, 
Okinawa and some parts of Skikoku, where the temperature is higher 
than in other parts of the country, that two crops are raised in the rice 
fields. In most other places, the low temperature of the soil, owing 
to the presence of too much moisture, obliges the farmers to con- 
tent themselves with the cultivation of rice alone. Still, owing to the 
improvements eflfected, the area of two-crop land is gradually increasing, 

as shown below: ^ . . 

Per cent, of 

(Cho.) rice farm. 

One crop fields i,985»5i3 7i 

Two crop fields 755,983 29 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 197 

The second crop raised after the cultivation of rice is generally 
mngi, rape, or genge, Japanese clover. 

Banking Facilities for Farmers. — The Japan Hypothec Bank 
(Kangyo Ginko), the Local Hypothec Banks (Noko Ginko), the sys- 
tem of Credit Guilds, and the Colonial Bank (Takushokti Ginko), have 
all been created with the express object of providing banking facilities 
for our farmers. 

Improvement of Agriculture, — In order to improve methods of 
farming, and to do away with various drawbacks with which our agri- 
culture has been handicapped, the Government has inaugurated many 
agricultural institutions of varied nature, which have contributed 
greatly to the promotion of our agricultural industries. The following 
are among the. most important of such institutions : 

1. State and Local Experimental Station, the work of which 
comprises original researches, practical application of agricultural 
theories, model farming, etc. 

2. Local Agricultural Training Schools for the purpose of im- 
parting to farmers elementary knowledge of the science of agriculture, 
surveying, meteorology, physics, chemistry, veterinary science, horse- 
shoeing, etc. 

3. State and Local Sericultural Training Schools. 

4. State Silk Conditioning House. 

5. Experimental Tea Farm and Curing House. 

6. Cattle and Fowl Epidemic Laboratory. 

7. State Cattle- Breeding Pastures. 

8. State Horse Pastures and Studs. 

9. Agricultural Societies. 

Agricultural Products. — The following several tables show the 
growth of agricultural products. 

I. Comparative Tabids op Ybari<y Acreage op Staple Food Stupps. 
(Fractions below decimal represents Ian in this and other tables) . 

1887. 1892. 1897. 1902. 

(Cho.) (Cho.) (Cho.) (Cho.) 

Ordinary rice ... . 2,391,912.6 2,440,311.1 2,457,682.1 2,499,337.8 

"Mochi" rice 215,701.1 268,294.6 267,472.0 263,864.2 

Upland rice 29,571.1 46,496.2 62,027.2 84,193.0 

Barley. 625,777.4 635,266.6 ' 653,266.6 645,307.8 

Wheat 390,460.6 434,251.1 458,239.2 484,176.8 

Rye 575,104.9 649,8553 651,448.5 675,453-9 

Beans 466,315.2 443,442.3 435,604.8 466,149.1 

Red beans 109,280.7 1 29,290.9 



198 



Japanese Exhibition, 



1892. 


1897. 


1902. 


(Cho.)' 


(Cho.) 


(Cho.) 


239,470.4 


250,387-7 


226,239.8 


27.338.5 


27,6749 


54.536.6 


90,528.6 


74,567-6 


70,510.7 


161,879.9 


174,138.2 


165.750.2 


243.180. 1 


259,166.7 


276,970.6 


21.961. 5 


28,99^.0 


42,139.7 


UCTS FOR 


Speciai« Use. 




1892. 


1897. 


1902. 


71.431-6 


44,444.0 


20,700.1 


18,972.5 


22,349-7 


16.891.1 


44.049-5 


50,712.3 


37,193.3 


29,059.0 


31,477.5 


23,946.3 


1 7 1. 795.0 


154,167.0 


157,045.1 



1887. 
(Cho.) 

Millet 243,407.1 

Sorghum 27,311.3 

Italian millet 87,167.3 

Buckwheat 158,409.9 

Sweet potatoes. . 221,520.4 

Potatoes 16,493.2 

II. STAPI.E PR< 

1887. 

Cotton 98,478.9 

Hemp 14,840.4 

Indigo leaves 50,257.4 

Tobacco leaves... 21,803.5 

Rape 167,295.1 

It will be seen from the foregoing tables that the area of cultivation 
of the staples, is showing, on the whole, a satisfactory increase. Es- 
pecially is this the case with beans, sweet potatoes and potatoes among 
the staple food stuffs, and hemp and tobacco among the staples for 
special use. The striking exception is the decrease in the area of the 
cotton plantations in consequence of the recent large import of foreign 
cotton. Our sugar industry has also suffered somewhat from foreign 
competition, but it has lately begun to recover its former prosperity, 
especially since our annexation of Formosa. 

x^gain, except for some staples of less importance, the yield from 
the same area has become increased, thanks to the better methods that 
have of late obtained in farming, as: 

(1). Comparative Yield of Stapi^e Food Stuffs per Tan. 

1887. 
(Koku.) 

Ordinary rice 

"Mochi" rice 

Upland rice 

Barley 

Wheat 

Rye 

Soja beans 0.698 

Red beans 

Millet 1.058 

Italian millet 1.265 

Sorghum 1.005 

Buckwheat 0.705 

Sweet potato (kwammc).... 253 
Potato (kwanime).. . .' 172 



1892. 


1897. 


1902. 


(Koku.) 


CKoku.) 


(Koku.) 


1.526 


1.209 


1.328 


1.410 


1.076 


1. 190 


0.781 


0.706 


0.721 


1.042 


1.255 


1.262 


0.708 


0.832 


0.817 


0.932 


0.946 


0.936 


0.701 


0.712 


673 




0.566 


548 


1.260 


0.957 


885 


1.250 


1.081 


805 


1.022 


0.941 


830 


0.714 


0.569 


575 


234 


256 


257 


184 


202 


1 28 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 199 

(2). Comparative Yibld op Stapi^bs for Speciai« Use per Tan. 

1887. 1892. 1897. 1902. 

(Kwamme.) (Kwamme.) (Kwamme.) (Kwamme.) 

Cotton 23 18 16 16 

Hemp 16 14 16 16 

Indigo leaves 31 35 38 34 

Tobacco leaves 27 26 28 35 

Rape (koku) 0.682 0.598 0.656 0.707 

(3). Comparative Table of Aggregate Output of Food-Stuffs. 

1887. 1892. 1897. 1902. 

(Koku.) (Koku.) (Koku.) (Koku.) 

Ordinary rice 36,675,775 37,276,606 29,722,736 33,201,556 

Mochi rice 3,100,153 3,789,712 2,878,944 3,138,868 

Upland rice 223,271 363,259 437,6i3 606,667 

Total 39,999,199 41,429,676 33,039,293 36,947,091 

Barley mugi 7,101,643 6,811,899 8,028,698 8,146,047 

Wheat mugi 3,041,740 3,078,832 3,811,000 3,954,497 

Rye mugi 5,678,661 6,165,792 6,165,792 6,325,082 

Total 15,822,044 15,951,146 1,800,973 18,425,626 

Soja beans 3,253,790 3,110,665 3,110,973 3,136,909 

Red beans 618,804 708,712 

MJHet 2,574,850 3,016,678 2,395,158 2,003,317 

Sorghum 274,562 278,259 260,414 286.734 

Italian millet 1,102,607 1,131,570 806,274 567,299 

Buckwheat 1,117,041 1,156,261 990,195 948,886 

Sweet potatoes (k warn.).. 561,407,587 568,371,606 662,391,590 712,126,037 

Potatoes (kwam.) 28,382,572 40,491,431. 58.528,287 53,832.873 

(4). Comparative Table of Aggregate Output of Special Staple Crops. 

1887. 1892. 1897. 1902. 

Cotton (kwamme) 22,388,590 12,584,822 7.304,253 3,322,047 

Hemp (kwamme) 2,396,856 2,745,802 3.569,159 2,687,594 

Indigo-leaf (kwamme) .. . 15,424,412 15,447,822 I9,4i5,593 12,495,151 

Tobacco-leaf (kwamme). 5.987,359 7,643.203 8,871,370 8,349,679 

Rape (kolu) i,i43,035 1,026,572 1,011,004 1,110,446 

In inquiring into the acreage of mulberry and tea fields which are 
vitally related to our two export staples, silk and tea, that of the latter, 
in contrast to that of the former, shows a striking falling off. One con- 
soling fact is that the output of tea shows an increase, due, principally, 
to the improved mode of curing. 



200 Japanese Exhibition, 



TabItB Showing the Yearly Average op Mulberry and Tea Fields. 

Mulberry. Tea. 

Year. (Cho.) (Tan.) (Cho.) (Tan.) 

1892 231,437. 7 60,699. 7 

1897 298,203. 9 58,982. I 

1902 312,145. 8 49,046. I 

Table Showing the Yearly Output of Cocoons and Tea. 

Cocoons. Tea. 

Year. (Koku.) (Kwamme.) 

1887 1,219,060 7,011,221 

1892 1,480.705 7,211,865 

1897 2,121,944 8,471,956 

1902 2,549,224 6,783,428 

Fruit culture and gardening have made a striking advance recently. 

Live stock do not yet show any marked development in number, 
but there has been a great improvement in their quality. The meas- 
ures for improving both the quality of the live stock and increasing 
their number that are now being carried on, will not fail to bear 
results in the near future. Dairy business is an industry of only 
recent growth, but its result is entirely satisfactory. 

Below is shown the number of cattle and horses during the last 

twenty years : 

Year. Cattle. Horses. 

1887 1,020,509 i,537»6o6 

1892 1,094,797 1,554,667 

1897 1,214,159 1,592,871 

1902.. . : 1,275,582 1,515,573 

The gross value of the staple agricultural products as calculaterl 
on the recent market price is as follows : y 

Rice 445,439,087 

Mugi 124.064,274 

Beans 35,952,282 

Others 153,872,649 

Straw 86,982,360 

Cocoons 93,618,991 

Silkworm Eggs 3,844,126 

Mulberry twigs and Silkworm litters 7,953,103 

Cured Tea 9,037,545 

Live Stock (cattle, horses, sheep, swine) . . . 4,953,533 

Slaughtered beasts 12,540,394 

Cattle and Horses killed by disease 256,831 , 

Dairy Products 4,128,017 

Staple Manure 23,672,628 

Poultry and Eggs 17,281,419 

Total .• 1,023,587,239 



J 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 201 

The chief items of agricultural products for export and the amount 

thereof are given below: 

1897 1898 1899 1900 1901 

Ri-e fpicul. 1,294,196 1,050,118 2,178,837 633,908 1,301,542 
\yfn 6,141,218 5,920,185 10,282,012 3,576,569 6,908,913 

Raw Silk /^*^ 6,919,861 4,837,329 5,946,911 4.630,903 8,697,706 

\yen 55,630,46042,047,411 62,627,721 44,657,02974,667,331 

Noshi and waste f ** 4,349,962 4,091,769 4,388,217 3,900,161 4,789,287 

silk \ " 3,019,973 2,655,931 4,074,086 4,161,318 4,468,769 

Green tM / *' 26,674,979 25,845-092 27,998,589 2,261,89526,651,839 

^'^^^" ^^* I " 7,441,952 7,862,492 7.699,625 7,998.589 7,819,498 

Other tea / ** 5,957,704 4,98i,540 6,733,055 5,978,2§2 6,596,632 

^^"^"^^^^ I *' 418,508 353,173 799,158 931,182 1,034,829 

Matting yen 3.232 J3S 3,938,450 3,717,489 3,310,042 5,43i.5i4 

Tilvhiilh^ /N^- 5,015,745 5,100.548 6,083,462 7.048,678 8,979,741 

^''^*'"*^^ \yen 149.906 128,820 258,564 257.919 266,178 

Peanuts i *' 1,661,253 3.012,967 3,298,185 5,305.195 8.817,442 

I '* 64,114 115,041 144,988 240,517 404,937 

Gin^emr /^*^ 368,730 356,069 402,221 402,914 419,328 

^ ^^ Xyen 484,227 423,837 476,868 407.671 452.924 

Mint i '* 57.604 45,401 76,210 51.321 120,681 

*^'"^ I •* 180,710 158,245 268,547 228,472 545,288 

Straw braids / N°- 6,760,384 5,96i,i25 7,134,655 8,802,039 6,974,457 

:>traw Drams.... <^^^ 3.181,915 2,404,003 2,770,178 4,025,159 2,986,836 

Wood wax Z^*'* 4.205,843 3.798.791 4.569,613 3.702,087 4.049.317 
Xyen 730,576 609.760 642.219 561,435 610,371 

Cotton / " 835,152 844.819 743,050 1,009,228 950,593 

^°"° I " 234,380 218,296 209,894 323,920 308,908 

The export of minpr items worth mentioning in 190 1 was as 
follows : 

Kin. Yen. 

Pepper 953,026 126,085 

Oranges 3.689,355 129,214 

Sweet Potatoes 9,408,026 203,356 

Vegetables 284,339 

Plants and Bulbs 105,801 

Seeds 75,687 

Hechima 3,209,168 1 12,924 

Ginger 1,162,359 130,972 

Feather 385.656 92,303 

Subjoined is the list of the principal items of agricultural products 
coming into Japan: 

1897 1898 1899 i9oo 1901 

Rice fpicul 1,361,39411,696,252 1,650,592 2,286,979 311.938 
Xyen 21,528,42948,219,810 5,960,166 9,011,536 2,878,958 

pi^' f^in 23,415,02138,854,44529,001,104 84.299,34262.972,707 
Xyen 1,156,569 2,022:413 1,370,857 3.882,517 2,873,302 

c«^ar /picul 3.207,950 4.369.046 2,731.817 4.045.785 4.928,075 

** Xyen 19,822,775 28,439.295 17.516,039 36,606,528 33.493,367 

Beans fpicul 2,349,376 2,406.507 308.786 1,707,742 1,938,474 
""Xyen 5,889,616 7,101.103 8,822,111 4,817,767 5.328.136 



202 Japanese Exhibition, 



Malt 



(kin 2,324.321 3,042,476 4,264.683 5,642,531 6.586,442 
Xyeu 221,535 293,510 468,619 619,220 765.634 



Raw rnttnn / picul 2,298.643 2,453.586 3.472,296 2,608,084 i,579.i62 
Xyen 43,620,215 45,744,371 62,210,717 59.471.62960,650,362 

Tnronrm i ^^*" 713.929 458,6i7 807,762 59^.999 441.371 
I yen 334.4i6 212,124 642,223 618,612 342,593 

Wild silk cocoons / " ^'^^ *5.76o 151.850 148,237 213.0S1 

Wild silk cocoons. I .. jj^^ ^^g^2 ^^^jg^ ^^j^^^ ^^3jg^ 

upnin / " 8,490,567 7,232,849 12,610,796 14.514.147 12,965.189 

^ I *' 654,791 590,517 1.245.049 1.700,409 1. 370. 183 

Oil rake f picul 1,704.471 2,101,410 2,795,504 2,280,687 3.477.704 
Xyen 3.315,587 4.614.967 9.791. 813 5.696,453 8,109,237 

Eggs 1^^ 337,769 492,553 826,960 1.243,065 1,298,611 

t„j:^^ fkin 1,196,134 1,806,276 1,768,729 1,851,673 1,243,790 

** Xyen 1,538,022 2,270,815 2,903,829 3.902,559 2,665,043 

Wool / ** 2,712,695 1,838.801 7.746,509 4.514.298 4,952,196 
I " 1,062,398 1,642,819 4,324.427 3.919.693 3.129,382 

Condensed milk . . { ^^^' ^3.784 i74.3o8 173,467 300,227 279,5^ 

{yen 201,204 359o5i 389.071 003,081 040,308 

Hides and leather*;/^"' I.974.5IO 2,922,836 3.104,458 2.696.663 3,344.o62 

Hides and leathers I ^^^^ 346,394 587.949 719.930 656,643 786,609 

Minor items worth mentioning in the year 1901 were as follows: 

Kin. Yen. 

Butter 181,278 119.339 

Cheese 70,593 29,206 

Coffee 142,175 45,292 

Tea 117,518 29,053 

Cotton Seeds 42,323,844 57i,720 

Sesame Seeds 5,699,927 284,784 

Grains and Seeds 460,742 

Leaf Tobacco 76,361 30,272 

Tallow 857,458 108,696 

Hair, Bristles, etc 191,916 260,024 

Wheat 8,587,462 272,868 

APPENDIX. 

Formosa. 

In the Palace of Agriculture stands eminently distinct from all 
others of the kind a typically Formosan gateway, painted in primary 
colors. This structure was one of a pair of the old official side-gates 
of the Government buildings in Taihoku, Formosa, erected by the 
Chinese 25 years ago, after the style of ancient Chinese architecture, 
and is now one of the historical remains of Formosa. The present 
Governor-General, in expression of his appreciation of the Exposition, 
willingly spared this gate to be removed from its place to adorn the en- 
trance to the Formosa section, and its material was brought thousands 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 203 

of miles over the Pacific. To both sides of the gate stand two 
Fomiosan pagodas, also of Chinese style. As will be seen from the 
beautiful silk sign hanging on the gate, with the embroidered figures, 
"Formosa, Japan," this section is exclusively devoted to exhibits from 
Formosa, which, together with its dependencies, was ceded to Japan 
by China in 1895, as a result of the late Japan-China war. 

Formosa lies to the southwest of the mainland of Japan, directly 
to the north of the Philippines, divided by the Boshi Channel, and to 
the west of the Chinese mainland, from which it is separated by the 
Formosa Channel. It covers an area of 13,417 square miles, and has 
a population of 2,925,072, which consists of 2,882,948 natives and 
42,124 Japanese, excluding Japanese troops stationed on the island. 
The native population may be divided into two elements, the aboriginal 
Formosans and the Formosan Chinese, who are immigrants from South 
China, and their descendants. The number of aboriginal Formosans 
is not exactly known, but in all probability not more than 100,000. 

With every natural advantage, Formosa is evidently destined to 
be one of the richest agricultural countries on earth. In spite of its 
location in the tropical zone, the climate is delightful. The rainfall 
and humidity are favorable for the growth of many varieties of the 
most valuable products. The northern part of the island, with its 
numerous hills and mountains, is most noted for the production of the 
famous Formosan Oolong tea; the interior mountainous portion cov- 
ered with thickest virgin forests, where the aboriginal natives dwell, 
is famous for the production of camphor, while the southern part is 
remarkably suited to the cultivation of sugar cane. Fruits, fiber and 
other valuable plants abound in the island and can be cultivated to 
the best advantage. Various kinds of oranges, banana, pineapple and 
lungan are the principal fruit products of the 'island, while China grass, 
jute, pineapple and pandanus are among the chief fiber products. 
On the line of economical plants we find peanuts, sesame, tobacco, 
indigo, various kinds of beans, sweet potatoes and turmeric. Rice is 
the principal agricultural product, though its export is now almost 
exclusively confined to Asiatic ports. Varieties of fine hard 
woods are also abundant in the interior forest land and promise a great 
future. Bamboo also thrives on the island and is utilized for various 
purposes. 

Mineral and marine products are represented by gold, sul- 
phur, coal, and various kinds of fish, though not yet fully developed. 
The Formosan Government in participating in the Exposition have 
decided to send only those products that are either already l^eing ex- 



204 



Japanese Exhibition, 



ported to the United States, or those which will appeal to demands in 
the future, excluding those that have no direct relation to tlie foreign 
trade of the island. The Formosan exhibition is, therefore, limited to 
a few items. 

Exhibits, 



GROUP 80. 

Fertilfzers* 

I. Osaka Alkali Joint Stock Co., 

Osaka — 
Super-phosphates. 
Xitrc^en fertilizer. 
Complete fertilizer. 

GROUP 81» 

Tobacco* 

I. Bureau of Tobacco Monopoly, 
Department of Finance, To- 
kio — 

Leaf tobacco. 

Table of production of tobacco. 

2. Iwaya, Matsnhei, Tokio — 
Cigarettes. 

GROUP 83. 

Thconr of AsTicuIture and Agri- 
cultural Statistics* 

I. Agricultural Experimental 

Station, Tokio — 
Best varieties of rice plants, with 

husked, non-husked and 

cleaned rice. 
Specimens of noxious insects of 

rice. 
Samples of injured rice. 
Samples of preserved fruits: 

Apples and persimmons, pears, 

oranges, loquats, myrica, etc. 
Diagram showing develq^ment of 

noxious insects and the method 

of clearing them. 



Maps showing the localities of 
scale insects. 

Maps showing the localities of 
rice insects. 

Maps showing the localities of 
the damage of rice crop by in- 
sects. 

Monograph and photos of the 
Jose scale insects. 

Pictures of damaged rice. 

Photos of fruits and vegetables. 

2. Bureau of Agriculture, Dc" 
partment of Agriculture and 
Commerce, Tokio — 

Map of the production of rice in 

Fu'and Ken. 
Diagram of cultivable land, total 

land area, and the land under 

cultivation. 
Map of the production of tea in 

Fu and Ken. 
Map showing mulberry tree in 

Fu and Xen. 
Map showing the production of 

raw silk. 

Comparative diagram of the ex- 
port silk. 

Diagram showing the destination 
' of exported silk, with its value. 

Diagram of imported and ex- 
ported agriculture products. 

Map showing the distribution of 
the state and provincial agri- 
cultural institutions. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904, 



205 



3. Pormosau Government, Tai- 

ho'ku — 
Photographs of tea manufactur- 
ing. 

4. Government S eric nit ural In- 

stitute, Tokio — 

Samples of cocoons and silk. 

Preparation and packing of raw 
silk for export. 

Samples of the silk staflfs made 
of different kinds of silk (in- 
stalled in Japanese Section, 
Palace of Manufacture). 

Silkworm raising and ruling of 
silk. 

Development of silkworm. 

Samples and model development 
of silkworms. 

Model of filature works (in- 
stalled in Jai>anese Section, 
Palace of Manufactures). 

5. Government Tea Experi- 

ment al Station, Tokio — 
Samples of tea. 

Photographs of tea plantation 
and factories. 

6. Japan Rate Silk Association, 

Tokyo — 
List of the famous raw silk pro- 
ducers in Japan. 

7. Silk Conditioning House, Yo- 

kohama — 
Photographs. 

8. Sur7'ey of Mineral Fertilizers, 

Tokio — 
Double superphosphate of cal- 
cium. 
Precipitated calcium phosphate. 
Phosphate rock. 



GROUP 84. 

Vesfctable Food Products and Agfri- 
culttsral Seeds* 

1. Ang-hak-gian, Shokwa, For- 

mosa — 
Peanuts. 

2. Asomachi Agricultural Soci- 

ety, Ibaraki-ken — 
Peanuts, erecting variety. 

3. Bocho Rice Dealers' Associa- 

tion, Yamaguchi-ken — 
Rice **Kokuratsu." 
Rice '^Miyako." 
Rice "Omatsu." 

4. Chhao-teng-tong, Shokz\.'a, 

Formosa — 
Peanuts. 

5. Chhao-thak, Toroku, For- 

mosa — 
Large peanut. 

6. Chibaken Agricultural Soci- 

ety, Chiba-ken — 
Paddy' rice. "Araki." 

7. Chiun-che, Taihoku, For- 

mosa — 
Peanuts, large and small grained. 

8. Chiu-pek-ni-po, Shinchi-ku, 

Formosa — 
Peanuts. 

9. Fukuokaken Rice Exporters^ 

Association, Fukuoka-ken — 
Uncleaned rice. 

10. Fukuokaken Agricultural So- 
ciety, Fukuoka-ken — 
Paddy rice. 

IT. Go-kun-san, Taiho-ku, For- 
mosa — 
Peanuts. 



2o6 



Japanese E-^hibition, 



12. Go-ango-sw, Taiho-ku, For- 
mosa — 
Peanut. 

13- ^^^0 ^'^^ Exporters' Associa- 
tion, KnmamotO'kcn — 
'*Higo" rice. 

14. Ho-su-chu, Shinchi-kii, For- 

mosa — 
Peanut. 

15. lap-hui-chhcng, Shokwa, For- 

mosa — 
Peanut. 

16. Ikenaga, Shinbei, Osaka — 
Rape oil. 

Shirashibori rape oil. 
Toyu oil (industrial oil). 
Eno oil (oil of perilla oci- 
moides). 

17. I to, Tamijiuro, Kagoshima- 

ken — 
Peanut, small grained. 

18. lun-ong'Chui, Toro-kii, For- 

mosa — 
Large peanut. 

19. Japan Rice Cleaning Mill, 

Ltd., Kobe— 
Cleaned rice, '*first quality." 
Cleaned rice, "second quality." 
Crushed rice. 

20. Kanagawa-ken Agricultural 

Society — 
Peanut, large and small. 

21. Kashima-gnn Agriculture So- 

ciety — 
Peanut, erect variety. 

22. Kho-kui, Toro-ku, Formosa — 
Peanut, creeping. 



23. Kiushiu Oil Co., Fukuoka- 

ken — 
Rape oil. 
Shirashibori rape oil. 

24. Koch-ti-ko, Toro-ku, For- 
mosa — 

Large peanut. 

25. Ko-se-liong, Shinchi-ku, For- 

mosa — 
Peanut. 

26. Kotakamura Agricultural So- 

ciety — 
Peanut, erect. 
Peanut, creeping. 
Peanut, improved. 

2y, Liau-sin, Taiho-ku, For- 
mosa — 
Peanut. 

28. Lim-eng-hi, Byoritsu, For- 

mosa — 
Peanut. 

29. Lo-song-buu, Taiho-ku, For- 

mosa — 
Peanut. 

30. Misuno, Yahei, Osaka — 
Rape oil, refined. 
Shirashibori rape oil. 

31. Nagashima,' Jiroyemon, Yo- 

kohama — 
Peanut, large grained. 
Peanut, small grained. 

32. Namekatamura Agricultural 

Society, Ibaraki-ken — 
Peanut, erect. 
Peanut, creeping. 

33. Namekata-gun Agricultural ' 

Society, Ibaraki-ken — 
Peanut, erect variety. 
Peanut, creeping variety. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



207 



34. Ng'Sim-pu, Shokzva, For- 

mosa — 
Peanut. 

35. Ng-te, Shinchi'kii, Formosa — 
Peanut. 

36. Nosawa & Co., Kobe — 
Peanut, small grained. 

37. Okamura, Hidetaro, Osaka — 
Eno oil, Anchor brand, boiled, A. 
Linseed oil, Anchor brand, boiled, 

B. 
Eno oil (of perilla ocimoides), 

boiled, C. 
Linseed oil. Anchor brand, 

boiled, D. 
Fish oil. Anchor brand, boiled. 

38. Okuda, Heihachi, Gifu-ken — 
Rape oil. 

Shirashibori oil. 

39. Omi Oil Co., Shiga-ken — 
Rape oil. 

Shirashibori oil. 

40. Omi Rice Dealers* Associa- 

tion, Shiga-ken — 
Uncleaned '*Watashibune.'' 
Uncleaned "Omachi." 
Uncleaned *'Shiratama." 

41. Ota, Seizo, Fukuoka-ken — 
Shirashibori rape oil. 

Rape oil. 

42. Owada, Shoshichi, Fukui- 

ken — 
Rape oil. 

Shirashibori rape oil. 
Linseed oil. 
Linseed, boiled. 
Eno oil (of perilla ocimoides). 



43. Owari Vegetable Co. — 
Dried water lily. 

Dried leppa. 
Dried carrot. 

44. Settsu Oil Co., Osaka — 
Rape oil. 

Shirashibori oil. 

45. Shizouka-ken Red Pepper &r 

Peanut Exhibitors Associa- 
ation, Shisuoka-ken — 

Peanut, large grained. 

Peanut, small grained. 

46. Taga-gun Agriculture Soci- 

ety, Ibaraki-ken — 
Peanut. 

47. Tamagawamura Agriculture 

Society — 
Peanut, erect grained. 
Peanut, creeping grained. 

48. To-tai-teng, Byoritsu, For- 

mosa — 
Peanut. 

49. Uyeda, Tokumatsu (Idzuto^ 

ku & Co.), Kobe — 
Peanut. 

GROUP 87* 

Farinaceous Products ond Their 
Derivatiyes* 

1. Fukuoka, Zenkichi, Osaka 

Branch, Osaka — 
Komugi barley sugar. 

2. Furukawa, Tomozo, Niigata- 

ken — 
Liquid barley sugar. 

3. Higo Chosen Barley Sugar 

Producers' Association, Ku- 
mamoto-ken — 
Chosen viscores barley sugar. 



208 



Japanese Exhibition, 



4. Hokwa & Co., Niigata-kcn — 
Liquid barley sugar. 

5. Horiyc, Do^o, Osaka — 
Ishi barley sugar. 
Hygienic barley sugar. 
Budo barley sugar. 

Hygienic nutritious barley sugar. 

6. Hoshi, Rinpei, Niigata-kcn — 
Liquid barley sugar. 

Liquid barley sugar, with figs. 

7. Idsumi Tetsukichi, Ibaraki- 

ken — 
Rice frake. 
Domioji rice meal. 

8. Inouyc, Mnraji, Ibaraki- 

kcn — 
Konnyakii meal. 

9. Ishibashi, IVahci, Tokio — 
Liquid barley sugar. 

Liquid barley sugar with raisins. 
Liquid barley sugar, "Okina 



ame. 



♦> 



10. Kato, Kenzo, Kioto — 
Liquid barley sugar, **Rannotsu- 



vu. 



»> 



11. Kir in, Asanojo, 

ken — 
Liquid barley sugar. 

12. Kurokawa, Jutaro, 

ken — 
Puerlaria starch. 



Niigata- 



Nara — 



13. Matsnda & Co., Kochi-kcn- 
Liquid barley sugar. 
**Tosuke-ame." 

14. Morino, Tosuke, Nara-ken- 
Puerlaria starch. 



15. Nagayama, Vasunosuke, Iba- 

raki'ken — 
Konnyaku meal. 

16. Nakamura, Hideo, Yokoha- 

ma — 
Prepared barley sugar. 
Liquid barley sugar. 
Hygienic barley sugar. 

17. Natsumc, Rihei, Shizuoka- 

ken — 
Millet sugar. 
*'Okina barley sugar." 

18. Osaka Barley Sugar Produc- 

ers' Ass'n, Osaka — 
**Okina'' barley sugar. 

19. Sodeyama, Mankichi, Niigata- 

ken — 
Hygienic barley sugar. 
**Tamafubuki.'' 
Barley sugar. 

20. Takahashi, Denycmon, Niiga- 

ta-ken — 
Millet sugar. 

21. Takahashi, Magoyemon, Nii- 

gataken — 
Millet sugar. 

Millet sugar with fruit juice. 
Okina barley sugar, with fruit 
juice. 

22. Takahashi, Otokichi; Yasu- 

da Kunimatsu, and three 
others, Kioto — 
Barley sugar. 

23. Tanadi, Shobei, Shizuoka- 

ken — 
Transparent barley sugar. 
Barley sugar with tea infusion. 
Okina barley sugar. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



209 



24. Tcrakedo, Jihei, Ibarakiken — 
Konn vakil meal. 

25. Tsunehara, Sakichi, Okaya- 

ma-ken — 
Liquid barley sugar. 

26. Wagnraya & Co., Tokio — 
Mashed bean for sweetmeats. 
Mashed bean, first quality. 
Domioji rice meal. 

Fine rice meal. 

27. Washiko, Bussan, Goshikai- 

sha, Ibarakiken — 
Konnvaku meal. 

28. Vaga, Naokichi, Shisu oka- 

ken — 
Refined barley sugar. 
Liquid barley sugar with tea. 

29. Yoneau, Tsunejiro, Tokio — 
Liquid barley sugar. 
Hygienic barley sugar. 
Shippo barley sugar. 

GROUP 88. 
Bread and Pastry* 

1. Imai, Seijiro, Kioto — 
Xodsukasa. 

2. Japan Confectioners' Associa- 

tion, Kioto — 
Preserved sweetmeats for ex- 
port. 

3. Kobayashi, Rinnosuke, Osa- 

ka- 
Millet ball "Awaokoshi." 

4. Koto, Biingo, Fukuokaken — 
Starch vermicelli. 

5. Nakamura, Hideo, Yokoha- 

ma — 
Rice biscuits. 
Confectioners' materials. 



6. Nishio, Tameji, Kioto — 
"Shogoin Yatsuhashi" (biscuit). 
"Shimcmohashi" biscuits. 

7. Noda, Teiju, Tokio — 
"Fusen-arare" bon-bon. 

8. Osaka, Seika & Co., Osaka — 
Biscuits. 

Combination biscuits. 

Postor. 

Jim. 

Mixed. 

Soda. 

Biscuits in fancy box. 

9. Tanno, Seizo, Osaka — 
Millet ball. 

GROUP 89- 

Preserved Meat^ Fish, Vesfetables 

and Fruit* 

I Akigun Agricultural Society, 

Kochiken — 
Dried persimmon. 

2. Akimachi Agricultural Socie- 

ty, Kochiken — 
Dried persimmon. 

3. Choa-lai-sewg, Kagi, Formo- 

sa — 
Dried nepbelium longana. 

4. Doimura Agricultural Socie- 

ty- 
Dried persimmon. 

5. Formosa Sugar Manufactur- 

ing Co., Hosan, Formosa — 
Sugar. 

6. Go-an, Yensuiko, Formosa — 
Dried nepbelium longana. 

7. Go-khai-heng, Kagi, Formo- 

sa — 
Dried nepbelium longana. 



2IO 



Japanese Exhibition, 



8. Hachiya Persimmon Dealers' 

Association, Gifu-ken — 
Dried persimmon. 

9. Inokiichimura Agricultural 

Society, Kochi-ken — 
Dried persimmon. 

10. lokimura Agricultural So- 

ciety, Kochi-ken — 
Dried persimmon. 

11. Kamitono, Masataro, Osaka — 
Narazuke. 

12. Kawakitamura Agriculfttral 

Society, Kochi-ken — 
Dried persimmon. 

13. Khu-tiau-lien, Yensuiko, For- 

mosa — 
Dried nepbelium longana. 

14. Kochikcn Agricultural So- 

ciety — 
Dried persimmon. 

15. Koeh-iok-seng, Kagi, For- 

mosa — 
Dried nepbelium longana. 

16. Koeh-toan-lai, Yensuiko, For- 

mosa — 
Sugar. 

17. Lian-gian, Kagi, Formosa — 
Dried nepbelium longana. 

18. Lim-tiong-eng, Yensuiko, For- 

mosa — 
Dried nepbelium longana. 

19. Lim-chin-bo, Kagi, For- 

mosa-^ 
Dried nepbelium IcHigana. 

20. Lo-keng-tan, Tainan, For- 

mosa — 
Sugar. 



21. Lo-lai, Yensuiko, Formosa — 
Dried nepbelium longana. 

22. Lo-seng, Yensuiko, For- 

mosa — 
Dried nepbelium longana. 

23. Lo-seng, Yensuiko, For- 

mosa — 
Dried nepbelium longana. 

24. Masuda, Naozo, Kanagawa- 

ken — 
Ham. 

25. Nakakomagun Agricultural 

Society, Yamanashi-kcn — 
Dried persimmon. 

26. Nakazono, Masakata, Koshun, 

Formosa — 
Dried ginger. 

27. Ng-him, Kagi, Formosa — 
Dried nepbelium longana. 

28. Ng-soang, Kagi, Formosa — 
Dried nepbelium longana. 

29. Nishibun Agricultural So- 

ciety, Kochi-ken — 
Dried persimmon. 

30. Nishimura, Jubei, Gifuken — 
Dried persimmon. 

31. Okamura, Chotaro, Hosan, 

Formosa — 
Canned pineapples. 
Nepbelium longana. 

32. Ong-soat-long, Tainan, For- 

mosa — 
Sugar. 

33. Ota, Koichi, Yantanashiken — 
Dried persimmon. 

34. Saito, Manpei, Kanagawa- 

ken — 
Ham. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



211 



35. So'htnt'the, Ako, Formosa — 
Sugar. 

36. Tan-hiau, chhtin, Yensuiko, 

Formosa — 
Dried nq>belium longana. 

37. Tan-oing, Kagi, Formosa — 
Dried nepbelium longana. 

38. Tan-keng-chho, Yensuiko, 

Formosa — 
Dried nepbelium longana. 

39. TaU'tho, Kagi, Formosa — 
Dried nepbelium longana. 

40. Tan-tian-chin, Yensuiko, For- 

mosa — 
Dried nepbelium longana. 

41. Tsuchiya, Ytishichi, Gifuken — 
Dried persimmon. 

Dried persimmon redessicated. 

42. Umanonyemura Agriculture 

Society, Kochiken — 
Dried persimmon. 

43. Yamada, Minosuke, Tokio — 
Fukushinzuke pickles. 

44. Yamada, Tahei, Yamanashi- 

ken — 
Dried persimmon. 

45. Yamanashi Fruit Ass'n, Ya- 

manashiken — 
Dried persimmon. 

GROUP 90* 

Sosfar and Gmfectionery— G>n(lf- 
ments and Relishes* 

1. Abe, Kahei, Niigataken — 
Shoyu. 

2. Abe, Yosohachi, Niigataken — 
Shovu. 



3. Aichiken Hoigun Agriculture 

Society, Aichiken — 
Red pepper "Metaka." 
Red pepper 'Takanotsume." 
Red pepper "Yatsubusa.'' 

4. Aisaiva, Hyosuke, Yamagata- 

ken — 
Raw peppermint oil. 
Raw menthol. 

5. Akowo Shoyu Brewery Co., 

Hyogo-ken — 
Shovu. 

6. Amagasaki Shoyu Brewery 

Ass'n, Hyogoken — 
Shoyu. 

7. Ang-hu'Sin, Taihoku, Formo- 

sa — 
Oolong tea. 

8. Bok-keit-san, Taihoku, For- 

mosa — 
Oolong tea. 

9. Be-sin-khiam, Taihoku, For- 

mosa — 
Pouchong tea. 

10. Central Tea Union, Tokio: — 
Japan Tea Manufacturing Com- 

' pany. 
Japan Tea Exporting Company. 
Sckiyo Tea Company. 
Fushimi Investment Company. 
Kushu Tea Exporting Company. 
Fuji & Company. 
Shizuoka Tea Company. 
Tokai Tea Trading Company. 
Shimada Tea Company. 
Makinohara Tea Company. 
Okasa Tea Company. 
Fujiyc Tea Company. 
Nakamura Tea Company. 



212 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Kioycki Tea Trade Association. 

Yantarnura & Co. 

Kagimoto National Product Com- 

pany. 
Kioto Sagara — County Tea Trad- 
ers Association {I to Kozai- 
mon, Mori Yeisuke, Tomaki 
Kamekichi, Koyenta Kane- 
kichi, Misoda Bunkichi.) 
Brick Tea. 

**Gyokiiro" ( choicest ) . 
Green tea. 
r»lack Tea. 

11. Cheng-jong'hoe, Toshiyen, 

Formosa — 
Oolong tea. 

12. Cheng-lion g'teng, Toshiyen, 

Formosa — 
Oolong tea. 

13. Chhi'piang-hu, Toshiyen, For- 

mosa — 
Oolong tea. 

14. Chhoa-lip, Toshiyen, Formo- 

sa — 
Oolong tea. 

15. Chiam-beng-tek, Taihoku, 

Formosa — 
Oolong tea. 

16. Chiam-hok-san, Taihoku, For- 

mosa — 
Oolong tea. 

17. Chiani-ki-siong, Taihoku, 

Formosa — 
Oolong tea. 

18. Chiu-bun-chhiang, Taihoku, 

Formosa — 
Oolong tea. 

19. Chinn-chheng, phiau, Taiho- 

ku, Formosa — 
Oolong tea. 



20. Chiun-ka-in, Taihoku, Formo- 
sa — 
Oolong tea. 

22. Chu-su-hun, Tdihoku, For- 

mosa — 
Oolong tea. 

23. Formosan Government, Tai- 

hoku — 
Tea. 

24. Fukuoka, Kichijiro, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Shoyu. 

25. Fukuokashi Shoyu Breakers 

Ass'n, Fukuokaken — 
Shoyu. 

26. Gifu Marusan & Co., Gifu- 

ken — 
Tamari. 

2y. Go-bun-siu, Taihoku, Formo- 
sa — 
Oolong tea. 

28. Go-chi-hien, Taihoku, Aichi- 

ken — 
Oolong tea. 

29. Hattori, Heinosuke, Aichi- 

ken — 
Tamari. 

30. Hosono, Kitaroku, Niigata- 

ken — 
Shoyu. 

31. Hosono, Sutejiro, Niigata- 

ken — 
Shoyu. 

32. Jap-bun-chin, Taihoku, For- 

mosa — 
Oolong tea. 

33. Jap-kitn-tian, Taihoku, For- 

mosa — 
Oolong tea. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. ' 213 

34. Idsawa, Chiubci, Hyogoken — 48. Kioto Confectioners' Associa- 
Shoyu. tion, Kioto — 

35. Idzumiyama Shoyu Brezvery Confectionery (for ceremonial 
Ass'n, Aomoriken — use). 

Shoyu. 49. Kobayashi, Keisuke, Yokoha- 

36. Idstiroku & Co., and Ito & '^'O— 
Co., Kobe— Menthol. 

Dried ginger. Peppermint oil. 

S7, long-ki'lien, Taihokii, For- 50- Koch-chhting-ng, Taihoku, 

niosa — Formosa — 

Oolong tea. Pouchong and Oolong tea. 

38. Ito, Magozayemon, Aichi- 51. Ko-chui-seng, Shinko, For- 
ken — mosa — 

Tamari. Oolong tea. 

39. lu-hou'Chheng, Taihoku, For- 52. Ko-hcng, Shinko, Formosa — 
mosa — Oolong tea. 

I Oolong tea. .^ Ko-kim-kiet, Shinko, Formo- 

! 40. lu-ki'siong, Taihoku, Formo- sa 

^(^ — Oolong tea. 

^ ' 54- Ko-teng, Shinko, Formosa — 

41. lun-khien-chi, Taihoku, For- Oolong tea. 

mosa — „ , - , ,. ^ .. . 

^ 1 ^ 55- Leng-chhun4im, Taihoku, 

Oolong tea. r- 

° Formosa — 

42. Kato, Rokuzo, Aichi-ken— Oolong tea. 

56. Liau-kim-kiong, Taihoku, 

43. Kato, Shobei, Aichi-ken — Formosa — 
Tamari. • Oolong tea. 

44. Kaivaguchi, Kichishiro, Hyo- 57. Li-ban-ku, Taihoku, For- 
gO'ken — mosa — 

Shoyu. Oolong tea. 

45. Kazcamori, Matasaburo, Osa- 58. Li-hui, Taihoku, Formosa— 
ka — Oolong tea. 

^ ' 59. Lim-liong-fek, Taihoku, For- 

46. Khu-kai-sek, Taihoku, For- mosa — 
mosa — Oolong tea. 

^ ^^* 60. Lim-seng-hcin, Taihoku, For- 

47. Kida, Otoshichi, Osaka — mosa — 
Shoyu. . Oolong tea. 



214 



Japanese Exhibition, 



6i. Li'pek-chin, Taihokn, For- 
mosa — 
Oolong tea. 

62. Li-teng-liong, Taihoku, For- 

mosa — 
Oolong tea. 

63. Ma^uda, Shinzabtiro, Osaka — 
Shoyu. 

64. Matsuhara, Heho, Gifukcn — 
Shoyu. 

65. Matsntani, Yaheiji, Osaka — 
Shoyu. 

66. Mikazvaya & Co., Akhikcn — 
*'Tamari." 

67. Mikawa Shoyu^ Bren^crs' Co., 

Aichiken — 
Shoyu. 

68. Miki, Yahei, Hyogo-ken— 
Shoyu. 

69. Minamine, Fukuzo, Osaka — 
Refined menthol. 
Peppermint oil. 

70. Miyeken Shoyu Brewers' As- 

sociation, Miyeken — 
Shoyu. 

71. Morita & Co., Aichiken — 
Shoyu and **Tamari." 

72. Nagao Kihei, Hyogoken — 
Shoyu. 

73. Nakahara, Nobuyiiki. Hyogo- 

ken — 
Shoyu. 

74. Na-tiok-chai, Toshiyen, For- 

mosa — 
Oolong tea. 

75. Ng-beng-sim, Taihoku, For- 

mosa — 
Oolong tea. 



76. Ng-chheng-seng, Taihoku, 
Formosa — 
Pouchong tea. 

yy. Nippon Shoyu Brewery Ass'n, 
Chibaken — 
Shoyu. 

78. Nishizvaki, Gihei, Hyogoken — 
Shoyu. 

79. Nobuga, Kisabei, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Shoyu, 

80. Nomura, Jiubei, Aichiken — 
"Tamari." 

81. Nosazcaya & Co., Kobe — 
Ginger. 

82. Nozazvaya & Co., Izutoku & 

Co., and Ito & Co., Kobe— 
Red pepper and photographs of 
its harvest and packing. 

83. Oda, Hikoghichiro, Fukuoka- 

ken — 
Shoyu. 

84. Ogai, Sentaro, Fukuokaken — 
Shoyu. 

85. Oguri, Hanyemon, Aichiken — 
*Tamari." 

86. Oguri, Saburo, Aichiken — 
Shoyu and tamari. 

87. Oguri, Tomijiro, Aichiken — 
Shoyu. 

88. Oita Shoyu Brezvers Assn, 

Oitaken — 
Shovu. 

89. Okazva, Ryonosuke, Yokaha- 

ma — 
Menthol. 
Peppermint oil. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



215 



90. Ong'Chheng'hun, Taihoku, 

Formosa — 
Pouchong tea. 

91. Ong'hong'Chheng, Taihoku, 

Formosa — 
Pouchong tea. 

92. Ofsuka, Manjiro, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Shoyu. 

93. Otsuka, Mojiuro, Hyogaken — 
Shoyu. 

94. Peh-chiet-soan, Taihoku, For- 

mosa — 
Pouchong tea. 

95. Po-i'iam Taihoku, Formo- 

sa — 
Oolong tea. 

96. Shizuoka Red Pepper and 

Peanuts Exhibitors* Ass'n, 
Shizuokaken — 
Red pepper. 

97. Shidzuoka Shoyu Brewers' 

Ass'n, Shizuoka-ken — 
Shoyu. 

98. Shimidzu, Zenzo, Niigata- 

ken — 
Shoyu. 

99. Shindo, Kaichiro, Osaka — 
Shoyu. 

100. Shinka, Tomitaro, Fukuoka- 

ken — 
Shoyu. 

loi. Shoji, Shingo, Hyogoken — 
Shoyu. 

102. So-liong'teng, Taihoku, For- 
mosa — 
Oolong tea. 



103. So-sien-giok, Taihoku, For- 

mosa — 
Oolong tea. 

104. Standard Ginger Works of 
Japan, Shizuokaken — 

Improved dried ginger with no 
ash. 

105. Suzuki, Zenroku, Aichi- 

ken — 
"Tamari." 

106. Takoka, Riyemon Hyogo- 

ken — 
Shoyu. 

107. Takeshima, Genso, Osaka — 
Shoyu. 

108. Tamaya & Co,, Aichiken — 
"Tamari." 

109. Tanaka Tvramatsu, Niigata- 

ken — 
Shoyu. 

no. Tan-chu-seng, Taihoku, For- 
mosa — 
Pouchong tea. . 

111. Tanagashima, Genbei, Osa- 

ka — 
Shoyu. 

112. Tan-giok-lo, Taihoku, For- 

mosa — 
Pouchong tea. 

113. Tan-heng-hong, Taihoku, 

Formosa — 
Oolong tea. 

114. Tan-huirsoat, Taihoku, For- 

mosa — 
Pouchong tea. 

115. Tan-kai-seng, Taihoku, For- 

mosa — 
Pouchong tea. 



2l6 



Japanese Exhibition, 



ii6. Tan-keng-ki, Shinko, For- 
mosa — 
Oolong tea. 

117. Tan-ki-ju, Taihokn, For- 

mosa — 
Oolong tea. 

118. Tan-kong-s\it, Taihokn, For- 

mosa — 
Pouchong tea. 

119. Tan-licn-hui, Shinko, For- 

mosa — 
Oolong tea. 

120. Tan-lim-eng, Shinko, For- 

mosa — 
Oolong tea. 

121. Tan-siong-phiau, Taihoku, 

Formosa — 
Pouchong tea. 

122. Tan-sni-le, Taihoku, For- 
mosa — 

. Oolong tea. 

123. Tan-sui-seng, Taihoku, For- 

mosa — 
Oolong tea. 

124. Tan-tai-tin, Taihoku, For- 

mosa — 
Pouchong tea. 

125. Tan-tek-jiong, Taihoku, For- 

mosa — 
Oolong tea. 

126. Tan-thicn-lai, Taihoku, For- 

mosa — 
Oolong tea. 

127. Tatsuno Shoyu Brmrry Co.. 
Hyogoken — 

Shovu. 



128. Tea Dealers Association, 

Taihoku, Formosa — 
Pouchong tea. 
Oolong tea. 

129. Teng-peng-hui, Taihoku. 

Formosa — 
Oolong tea. 

1 30. Tiang-teng-'wong, Taihoku, 
Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

131. Tin-un-iong, Taihoku, For- 

mosa — 
Pouchong tea. 

132. Tiun-chiam-khoc, Taihoku, 

Formosa — 
Pouchong tea. 

^33' Tiun-kien-seng, Shinko, For- 
mosa — 
Oolong tea. 

134. Totomi Ginger and Vegeta- 

ble Sponge Producers' As- 
sociation, Shisuokaken — 

Improved ginger without ash. 

Improved ginger with ash. 

Powdered ginger, prepared with 
no ash. 

Raw ginger with ash. 

Raw ginger without ash. 

135. Toyoda, Kumajiro, Osaka- 

fn- 
Shovu. 

136. Tsubota, Asagoro, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Shovu. 

137. Tsubota, Kiutaro, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Shovu. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



21 



138. Uyeda, Tamifiosuke, Hyo go- 

ken — 
Shoyu. 

139. Uycki, Kyo, Osaka — 
Shoyu. 

140. IVachi, Shigeyuki, Fuknoka- 

ken — 
Shoyu. 

141. U'akaye, Rokubei, Osaka — 
Shoyu. 

142. Watanahe, Shosaburo, Ya- 

magataken — 
Peppermint oil. 
Menthol. 
Stick-formed menthol. 

143. Yamamoto, Matsabitro, 

Osaka — 
Shoyu. 

144. Yamauchi, Motohei, Aichi- 

ken — 
"Tamari.'* 

145. Yamaguchi Shozo, Aichi- 

ken — 
*-Tamari." 

146. Yanagiwara, Goyemon, Gifn- 

kcfi — 
"Tamari." 

147. Yazazi'a, Tatar 0, Yokaha- 

ma — 
Menthol. 
Peppermint oil. 

148. Yehara, Kinbei, Osaka — 
Shoyu. 

149. Yentaku, Kamejiro, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Shovu. 



150. Yesaki, Yoyemon, Aichikcn — 
**Tamari" and shoyu. 

151. Yoshida, Sakujiro. Fukno- 
kaken — 

Shovu. 

152. Yokoyama, Shozo, Hyo go- 
ken — 

Shovu. 

153. Yoshikaiva, Yonejiro, Yoko- 

hama — 
Red pepper. 
Menthol. 

GROUP 9U 

Waters* 

1. Arima Mineral Water Co., 

Hyogoken — 
Arima mineral water. 

2. Kazvakubo, Hisayuki, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Hirano mineral water. 

3. Kujakti & Co,, Kobe — 
Hirano mineral water. 

4. Sugita, Ikkan, Kobe — 
Xunobiki Tansan water. 

5. Uchida, Kocabiiro, Kobe — 
Hirano mineral water. 

GROUP 94- 
Fermented Beveras:es« 

1. Fukuoka-ken Sake Brcwerx 

Ass'n, Fukuoka-ken — 
Sake (rice liquor). 

2. Hanaki, Jinyemon. Hyogo- 

ken — 
Sake. 



2l8 



Japanese Exhibition, 



3. Hirano Heibei, Hyogoken — 
Sake. 

3A. Idzumi, Sensuke, Hyogo- 
ken — 
Sake. 

4. Ikegami, Mohei, Hyogoken — 
Sake. 

5. Inaba, Jisaemon, Aichiken — 
Sake. 

6. Ito, Shkhiroye, Aichiken — 
Sake. 

7. Ito, Magoyemon, Aichiken — 
Sake. 

8. Ito, Shinzo, Aichiken — 
Sake. 

9. Ishikawa, Hachiroji, Aichi- 

ken — 
Mirin liquor. 

10. Kano, liroyemon, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Sake. 

11. Katsube, Jiuyemon, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Sake. 

12. Konishi, Shiny emon, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Sake and mirin liquor. 

13. Kugai & Co., Aichiken — 
Sake. 

14. Mase, Manzo, Aichiken — 
Sake. 

15. Mase, Shotaro, Aichi-ken — 
Sake. 

16. Nagabe, Bunjiro, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Sake. 



17. Nippon Beer Brewery Co., 

Tokio-fu — 
Beer. 

18. Noda, Rokuzaemon, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Sake. 

19. Oizi'a, Hyakutaro, Aichi- 

ken — 
Mirin. 

20. Osaka Beer Brewery Co., 

Osaka-fu — 
Beer. 

21. Sakaguchi, Kichizo, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Sake. 

22. Tatsuma, Hanyemon, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Sake. 

23. Tatsuma, Hanzo, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Sake. 

24. Tatsuma, Yetsuzo, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Sake. 

25. Tatsuma, Yohei, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Sake. 

26. Uchida, Shichirobei, . Aichi- 

ken — 
Sake. 

27. Urabe Sake Brewery Co., Hy- 

ogo-ken — 
Sake. 

28. IVakaye, Genzayemon, Hyo- 

go-ken — 
Sake. 

29. Washio Kiutaro, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Sake. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



219 



30. Watanabe, Tetsti, Hyogo- 

ken — 
Sake. 

31. Yamantura, Tazayemon, Hyo- 

go-ken — 
Sake. 

32. Veigashima Sake Breivery 

Co., HyogO'ken — 
Sake. 

GROUP 95. . 
Inedible Agfricultural Products. 

1. Sakaki, Kunisada, Taiho-ku, 

Formosa — 
White bleached China grass. 

2. Bok-chhun-lai, Banshoryo, - 

Formosa — 
Zingiber. 

3. Chhi-piang-siong, Byoritsn, 

Formosa — 
China grass. 

4. Giam-siin, Tainan, Formosa — 
Jute. 

5. Go-ban-suiL Banshoryo, For- 

mosa — 
Zingiber. 

6. Heng-thien-lai, Yensiiiko, 

Formosa — 
Zingiber. 

7. KhO'tek-iong, Shokzva, For- 

mosa — 
Jute. 

8. Koa-in, Banshoryo, For- 

mosa — 
Zingiber. 

9. Koch-in, Banshoryo, For- 

mosa — 

Zingiber. 
10. Komatsu, Shigekichi, Tai- 
nan, Formosa — 

White bleached Giina grass. 



11. Lau-teng-hui, Kagi, For- 

mosa — 
Jute. 

12. Liau-hoa-te, Banshoryo, For- 

mosa — 
Zingiber. 

13. Li-hoe, Banshoryo, Formosa — 
Zingiber. 

14. Li-ien-ti, Hosan, Formosa — 
Pineapple fibre. 

15. Loa-toa-gong, Taiho-ku, 

Formosa — 
Jute. 

16. Lo-thoang-beng, Banshoryo, 

Formosa — 
Zingiber. 

17. Ln-chheng-hun, Giran, For- 

mosa — 
Jute. 

18. Liii-chhun-sam, Tainan, For- 

mosa — 
Jute. 

19. Ng-beng-san, Shokwa, For- 

mosa — 
Pineapple fibre. 

20. Ng-cheng-kheng, Tainan, 

Formosa — 
Pineapple fibre. 

21. Ng-sin-keng, Kagi, For- 

mosa — 
Jute. 

22. Ng-teng-lien, Byoritsii, For- 

mosa — 
China grass. 

23. Nosawa & Co., Kobe — 
Improved vegetable sponges 

(LuflFa). 



220 



Japanese Exhibition, 



24. Ong-hap, Banshoryo, For- 

mosa — 
Zingiber. 

25. Sia-kuin-si, Shokwa, For- 

mosa — 
Pineapple fibre. 

26. So'hun-the, Hosan, For- 

mosa — 
China grass. 

2y, Standard Ginger IVorks of 
Japan, Shizuoka-ken — 
Improved vegetable sponges 
(Luffa). 

27A. Takei, Shinkichi, Taiho-kn, 
Formosa — 
Bleached China grass fiber. 

28. Tan-but-hoa, Taiho-kn, For- 

mosa — 
Jute. 

29. Tan-cheng-kiet, Yensniko, 

Formosa — 
Zingiber. 

30. Tan-chhai-hun, Yensniko, 

Formosa — 
Zingiber. 

31. Tan-iam, Tainan, Formosa — 
Zingiber. 

32. Tan-khing-lin, Byoritsu, For- 

mosa — 
China grass. 

33. Tan-thai, Hosan, Formosa — 
Pineapple fibre. 

34. Tan-tiau-chhiang. Giran, For- 

mosa — 
Jute. 

35. Tan-tiau-chin, Ycnsitiko. For- 

mosa — 
Zingiber. 



36. Tan-ni-ham, Shokwa, For- 

mosa — 
Jute. 

37. Tin-chcng-liong, Shinchi-ku, 

Formosa — 
China grass. 

38. Tin-kict, Hosan, Formosa — 
Pineapple fibre. 

39. Tin-tcng-kho, Tainan, For- 

mosa — 
CTiina grass. 

40. Totomi Ginger and regetabJc 

Sponge Association, Shisuo- 
ka-ken — 
Improved vegetable sponges 
(Luflfa), extra large. 

41. Tsuda, Chojo, Ibaraki-kcn — 
Gown made of silk produced by 

worms of chestnut tree (Cari- 
gula grit). 

42. IVakiyama, Yesshin, Tainan, 

Formosa — 
White bleached China grass. 

43. Yasutake, Sutejiro, Kagi, For- 

mosa — 
China grass. 

GROUP 96. 

Useful Insects and Their Products, 
and Plant Diseases* 

1 . F n j is a w a, Tomokichi, 

Osaka — 
Yellow wax. 

2. Nazca, Yasiishi, Gifu-kcn — 
Collections of beneficial and in- 
jurious insects. 

3. Shivo, Suyekichi, Osaka — 
Bee wax. 

Honev. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 221 



CHAPTER IX. 

DVIPARTMENT OF HORTICLLTLRE. 

Introductory Remarks, 

I. Fruit. — As the foocl-stuffs that are ordinarily used by our 
countrymen contain a large percentage of water, the Japanese have not 
up to the present used much fruit as dessert. Moreover, deterred by 
the imperfect facilities of transportation, the business of fruit culture 
was comparatively neglected. It was after the introduction of the 
Western style of living and the greater perfection of the means of 
communication that the industry attained a sudden development. The 
production of an excellent sort of apple in Hokkaido and the north- 
eastern districts of Honshu, as also the successful growth of fruits of 
the orange family in Kushu and other warm districts are among the 
results of these changes. Indeed, Japan is now exporting to America 
and Siberia no small quantity of fruits, and there is every possibility 
of the business of fruit culture growing more and more prosperous, 
both for consumption at home and for shipment abroad. 

Owing to the geographical formation peculiar to the country, the 
fruits grown in Japan are of diverse kinds, and may generally be 
classified as follows: 

Fruits of the orange family comprising Mandarin oranges atid 
other oranges, lemons, prunello, «tc. 

Apples, pears, cherries, persimmons, plums, grapes, peaches, apri- 
cots, loquats, berries, bananas, pineapples, etc. 

The above are distributed geographically as follows : 

Oranges. — Wakayama, Kagoshima, Osaka, Yamaguchi, Shizuoka 
Hyogo, Nagasaki, etc. 

Apples. — Hokkaido, Aomori, Iwate, Yamagata, Miyagi, P'uku- 
shima, etc. 

Grapes. — Yamanashi, Niigata, Kanagawa. etc. 

Cherries. — Hokkaido, Akita, Yamagata, etc. 

Bananas and Pineapples. — Formosa, Loochu, and the Bonin 
Islands. 

Pears, persimmons and the rest are grown more or less in every 
part of the country. 

Of those fruits, some are of native origin, while many are imported. 
Apples, pears, grapes, cherries, strawberries, etc., that have been intro- 
duced from America and other countries, are held in great esteem, and 
have practically superseded the indigenous varieties. 



222 Japanese Exhibition, 

2. Flowers and Garden Plants, — From natural taste and tradi- 
tional custom, our countrymen are very fond of flowers and ornamental 
plants and trees. They spare neither pains nor money on the decora- 
tion of even miniature gardens with fantastic rocks and well-shaped 
trees and plants, but they pride themselves most on their skill in grow- 
ing dwarf trees and shrubs in pots. Nor do they care less for the cul- 
tivation of such flowering plants as the chrysanthemum, the peony, 
morning-glory, etc. 

Following are some of the principal flowers of the season : 

Spring Flowers. — Cherry, peach, azalea, peonies, lilies of various 
kinds, pink, hydrangea, chrysanthemum, etc. 

Summer Flowers. — Morning-glory, bush-clover, lotus, chrysan- 
themum, poppies, etc. 

jUihwin Flowers. — Crysanthemum, begonia, orchids, flowers of 
the gentian family, pink, etc. 

Winter Flo^vers. — Crysanthemum, plum, camellia, hyacinth, etc. 

3. Truck Farming. — Truck farming as a business attained 
marked progress only lately and as a result of the improved facilities 
of communication. The business of forcing the growth of vegetables 
by artificial heat has become quite profitable in the suburbs of large 
cities. The principal vegetables raised are: 

Fruits of the gourd family, peas, beans, etc. 

Roots and bulbs, such as radishes of various kinds, carrots, po- 
tatoes, lilies, onions, etc. 

Greens of sundry kinds. 

Vegetables used for condiments, as ginger, horse-radish, pepper, 
etc. 

4. Cured Fruits and Vegetables. — The cured fruits and vege- 
tables that are prepared to a large extent are of limited kind, being 
generally pickled plums, sugared orange peels, jams, dried peeled 
ladish and edible gourd, tinned fruits and vegetables. 

In view of the importance of encouraging horticulture, the Govern- 
ment established from the year 1902, the Experimental Horticultural 
Garden at Okitsu, Shizouka-ken, to deal with the following matters: 

Matters relating to the selection and cultivation of indigenous and 
foreign fruits and vegetables. 

]\fatters relating to the selection of seeds and saplings. 

Matters relating to preparing and curing of fruits, etc. 

Matters relating to the distribution of seeds and saplings. 

As similar work has been started by not a few local experimental 
farms, our horticultural business will most probably show marked im- 
provement at no distant date. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



223 



Exhibits. 



GROUP t05- 

Appliances and Methods of Pomol- 

o^, Viticultttfe, Floricolttttc 

and Artx>riculttfte« 

1. Imperial Japanese Commis- 

sion — 
Garden. 

2. Tanaka & Co,, Tokio — 
Spray (installed in Japanese Sec- 
tion, Palace of Agriculture). 

3. Yamanaka & Co., Osaka — 

Fancy fence. 

Male and female stag, in bronze. 

Crane, in bronze. 

Lantern. 

GROUP J07- 

Pomologfjr* 

(Installed in Japanese Section, Polace of 
Agrictdttire*) 

1. Aritagun Orange Association, 

Wakayatna — 

Natsudaidai orange. 
Unshiu orange. 

2. Hagi Natsumikan Export As- 

sociation, Yamaguchi — 
Natsumikan orange. 

3. Inagtin Orange Association, 

Wakayama — 

Unshiu orange. 
Natsudaidai orange. 



4. Kogamura Agricultural 
ciety, Nagasaki — 

Unshiu orange. 



So- 



5. Nishisonoki-gun Agricultural 

Society, Nagasaki — 
Unshiu orange. 

6. Osaka Senhoku-gun Agri- 

culture Society, Osaka — 

Unshiu orange. 

7. Shizuoka Iwohara-gun 

Orange Association, Shizu- 
oka — 
Natsudaidai orange. 
■ Unshiu orange. 

8. Shizuoka Shita-gun Orange 

Association, Shizuoka — 

Orange. 

GROUP 108. 

Trees, Shfubs, Ornamental Plants 
and Flowers* 

(In the Japanese Garden.) 

1 . F urn kazva Teinosuke, 

Osaka — 
Morning glory. 

2. Kibe, Yonekichi, Tokio — 

Yomato cedar. 

Hyakunichiko. 

Pine. 

Cedar. 

(Installed in Japanese Pavilion. 

3. Osaka Horticulturists' Associ- 

ation (Represented by Shi- 
momura Shoshichi), Osa- 
ka— 

Peony (tree). 
Peony (herbaceous). 
Darallia fern. 
Dwarf plants in pots. 



} 



224 



Japanese Exhibition, 



4. Toyama, Shibato, Kobe — 
Bamboo palm (rhapis flabellifor- 

mus). 
Kwannonchiku. 
Ha ran. 

Cvcas revoluta. 
(linmatsu. 
Pine. 

5. Wat use, Torajiro, Tokio — 
Flower seeds. 

■ 

6. Yamanaka &r Co., Osaka — 
Plants in pots. 

GROUP no. 

Seeds and Plants for hardens and 

Nurseries* 

(Inttallcd in Japuicse Section, Palace of 
Agrictflttsrc.) 

I. Watase, Torajiro, Tokio — 
Vegetable seeds (16 kinds). 



GROUP UU 

Agriculture and Fruit Culture* 

(Tnitaflfd in Japanese Section, Palace of 
Africultiire*) 

1. Formosa Government, Taiho- 

ku— 
Pots of bamboo. 

2. Hachiya Kaki Dealers' Asso- 

ciation, Gifu-ken — 
Persimmon seedlings. 

3. Inazawa Agriculture Society, 

Aichi-ken — 
Orange seedlings. 

4. Nakakoma-gun Agriculture 

Society, Yamanashi-ken — 
Persimmon seedlings. 

5. Tanikazva A^isaburo, Hiro- 

shima — 
Persimmon seedlings. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1964. 225 



CHAPTER X. 
Department of Forestry. 

Introductory Remarks. 

As in the case of fishery exhibits, the Japanese Commission, con- 
ferring with the Department of Agriculture and Commerce, restricted 
the kinds of exhibits in the department of forestry within the limits of 
the following items : Seeds, chief forest trees and planks, bamboo- 
roots and bamboos and their manufactures, shavings and their manu- 
factures, match sticks of various materials, inlaid wood- works and 
their materials, pine wax and oil, camphor and camphor oil, wood wax, 
acetic acid and acetate, vines and their manufactures, and various 
kinds of eatable mushrooms, such as Lepiota (Shiitake), Raeonyces 
digitatus (Twatake), and Matsu-take. Exhibitors were selected and 
appointed by the Commission from among the worthiest producers of 
these articles. Official exhibits, however, were not required to comply 
with these restrictions. 

Forest Administration. — The forests of Japan are under the regu- 
lation of the Forest Law of 1897, which provides for the use of Utiliza- 
tion Forests and for the restriction of reckless felling in the Protection 
Forests, etc. The execution of the same law is carried on by the local 
Government under the supervision of the Minister of Agriculture and 
Commerce. The regulation of the State Forests is provided for by 
the Law relating to State Forests and Plains of 1899. The official or- 
ganization for State Forests was established by the promulgation oi an 
Imperial Ordinance in 1886. By virtue of this ordinance, the whole 
Empire is divided into ten districts termed *' Major Forest Reserves," 
which are again subdivided into smaller districts termed *' Minor Forest 
Reserves,'' numbering 270 in all. The latter, in turn, are subdivided 
into smaller "Protective Ranges." The locations of the Major Forest 
Reserves, as well as the number of lower divisions, are shown in the 
following table : 



226 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Extent of Number Number 
Location of jurisdiction of Minor of 

Major ForeHt Reserve. Midor Forest of the M. F. Forest protective 

Re«er\'e. R. (unit of Reaer- Ranges 

1,000 cho.) ves. 

Aomori, Dai Rinkusho. . Aomori, Mutsu i,37o 35 173 

Akita, ** " . . Akita, Ugo 1,091 21 95 

Miyaghi, ' " . . Sendai, Rikiizen 1,286 34 150 

Tokyo, '* *' • . . Tokyo, Miisashi 936 23 89 

Nagano, '* ** . . Xagano, Shinano 931 14 64 

Osaka, *** '* ..Osaka, Stttsii 567 20 98 

Hiroshima, " ..Hiroshima, Aki 281 32 169 

Kochi " ** ..Kochi, Tosa 336 27 122 

Kumamoto ** . . Kumamoto, Higo .... 331 40 158 

Kagoshima ** . . Kagoshima, Satsiima.. 446 24 141 

Total 10 Major Reserves. .. .7,575 270 1.259 

The above organic law is now in force in the Mainland, Shikoku 
and Kushu. The State Forests of Hokkaido, owing to the advance- 
ment of colonization in that island, are now placed under the direction 
of the Department of Home Affairs, which acts through the Governor 
of the same island. The State Forests of Formosa are managed by 
the Governor of the island under the surveillance of the Minister of 
Home Affairs. 



Classification of Forests. — As the country is very mountainous, 
the area of land available for cultivation is comparatively limited, 
leaving most of the country covered with trees and shrubs. The aggre- 
gate area of forest land in Japan is 23,087,000 cho, or 59 per cent of 
the total area of the Empire. 

Tlie entire forests are divided into Protection Forests and Utiliza- 
tion Forests. The former are established for the protection of forest 
trees by preventing reckless felling, which is apt to impoverish the 
soil of surrounding districts and to cause disastrous floods in the event 
of heavy rainfalls. The object in establishing the latter is to increase 
the forest products by encouraging forest enterprises. The following 
figures give the area of these two classes of forests: 

"cho" 

Protection Forests 699,148 

Utilization Forests 22,388,216 

Total 23,087,364 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 227 

Classified according to their ownership, the figures for each class 

stand as follows: ,. , „ 

cho 

State Forests 13,125,320 

Crown Forests 2,091,789 

Municipal Forests 1,714,754 

Forests of Shrines and Temples 167,629 

Private Forests 5,987,872 



Total 23.087,36.1 

Beside these, there are large uncleared areas of land in Japan termed 
"Unused Land," or "Genya.*' Practically, *'Gefiya' is uncultivated land, 
devoid of trees and, in most cases, of water. ''Gcnya' bears a close 
relation to the forests. It is hoped that a part of this unused land may 
be either profitably utilized as grazing land or turned into farm land. 
But most of the '* Unused Land'' will finally be converted into forests. 

The unused land (Genya) under State ownership was, in 190 1, 
1,434,666 cho; that owned by the crown was 157,174 cho, while the 
remaining 1,053,462 cho was private property. The total area was 
2,645,302 cho, or 6.8 per cent of the whole area. 

The fprests of Japan are in the mountainous districts along the 
backbone of the country and are seldom found in the plains or along 
the coast. Again, they are more numerous in the cold regions in the 
north, and considerably less in the warmer regions in the south, as 
shown in the following table: 

Be.l«n«. Ijr^,,,. ^Slj™,. M»»^«r ggr" ^"-«'- """'"'• 

(cho) (cho) (cho) (cho) (cho) (cho) 

Hokkaido 5,492,489 651,550 14.827 6,158,966 

Aomori 1,370,887 29,788 81,061 io,737 440,275 1,932,758 

Akita 1,091,491 11,509 266 59,837 1.163,103 

Miyagi 1,216,118 126 9i,5.36 9.524 359o3^ 1.746,836 

Tokyo 942,253 628,859 131,910 14,684 1,038.921 2.756,627 

Nagano 93^746 476,304 275,214 2,328 305.735 i.99i,327 

Osaka 567,716 304,549 592,497 106,977 1.234,940 2,806.679 

Hiroshima ... 281,948 513 344,763 12,829 1,342,579 1,982,632 

Kochi 336,312 87,965 4,526 597.274 1,206,079 

Kumamoto 331,442 45»7i8 4,536 503,124 884.830 

Kagoshima ... 446,278 47,015 1,212 85,975 580,480 

Okinawa 46,630 5,566 4,853 57,049 



Total 13,125,320 2,091,789 1,714.754 167,629 5.987.872 23,087,364 

1 cho. — 2% acres. 299 cho. = 1 Hquare mile- 

The above table does not include the forests in Formosa and the 
Kurile islands. 



228 Japanese Exhibition, 

Thus we see that Japan is still well provided with timber. The 
northern provinces of the Main Island and Hokkaido are especially 
abundant in forests and forest products. In these provinces we will 
find forests in the neighborhood of towns and villages, their outputs 
being more than sufficient to meet the local needs for building, indus- 
trial and mining purposes. Hokkaido exports timber to the Main 
Island and to China and Korea to be used for building and for rail- 
way construction. Thiijopsis Dolabrata and Cryptomcria Japonica 
(species of cedar) timber produced in Aomori and Akita, are exported 
not only to Tokvo and Osaka but also to Shikoku and Kushu. The 
forests in the northern part of Honshu are mostly natural forests. 
On the other hand, those in the southern provinces of Honshu, Kushu 
and Shikoku are mostly planted forests, although there are some splen- 
did virgin forests in Tosa and C>sumi. 

Sylviculture was early developed in Yoshino in the province of 
Yamato, and in parts of Kii, Tamba, Inaba, Higo and Settsu, where we 
now find splendid woods producing both timber and fuel. 

Forest Zones. — Owing to her peculiar geographical, geological 
and climatic conditions, Japan is richly furnished with various kinds 
of forest trees and with luxurious floras. Not less than eight hundred 
species and varieties of forest trees are found well suited for culture in 
Japan. As a matter of fact, however, only some twenty species are 
regarded as of special importance from the economic point of view. 

The forests of Japan are distributed among four zones, viz., 
tropical, semi-tropical, temperate and frigid. 

1. The tropical forest zone extends over the whole oi Formosa, 
the southern half of the Loochoo Islands, the Yayeyama group and the 
Ogasawawa Islands. lianyan is the most important tree in this zone. 

2. The semi-tropical forest zone comprises a portion of the Loo- 
choo Islands, the whole of Shikoku and Kushu, a part of Honshu, 
lying south of 36°. The region occupied by evergreen broad-leaf trees 
abounds in hard wood of various kinds, used in shipbuilding, furniture 
manufacture and decorative works. Conifers are well represented in 
this zone by Piniis Derisi flora S et Z and Pimis Thiinbergii, Pari. 
Tliese two species of pines form a forest by themselves either in plains 
or on hills. They flourish in barren districts where most other vege- 
tations fail to grow. They grow rapidly. The wood is yellowish or 
white and hard, but elastic, with characteristic durability in, the water. 
It is extensively used in engineering works and in joinery and building. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 229 

3. The temperate forest zone extends from the jiorthern half of 
Alain Island to the southern part of Hokkaido, between 36"* and 43° 5', 
where average annual temperature ranges from 6° to 13**. 

These forests cover a large area, not a few of them maintaining 
their primitive features. They produce various valuable timbers, and 
form an important sylvan resource of Japan. The chief trees of the 
zone are conifers, which grow rapidly and have been successfully cul- 
tivated. 

A valuable kind of Cryptomeria Japonica Don is found in Yaku- 
shima and is especially prized for its beautiful grains, termed ''Udziira- 
niokn" (partridge-spotted) or ''Tamamokir (round-spotted), etc. This 
timber is especially prized in making valuable furniture and in decora- 
tive arts. Abies Fir ma S. et Z. and TItuga Sieboldi, Carr are used in 
making various kinds of boxes. They also furnish the material for the 
wood pulp industry. Droad-leaf deciduous trees, which are quite 
numerous in this zone, occupy more than one-half of the whole forest 
area. They are, however, seldom found forming forests by themselves 
except in the case of a few such as Qucrcus Dentata, Thunb. Zelkowa 
Keaki is particularly valuable. It often attains a size of fifty feet in 
length and six or seven feet in diameter. This wood, being very 
strong, hard, and durable, is valuable for hou.ses and ship building, and 
for the manufacture of furnitures. 

4. The frigid forest zone occupies those places in the northern 
half of Hokkaido and the Kuriles where the average temperature is 
not higher than 6°. As the forests in this zone, except those in Hok- 
kaido, are located in high altitudes with poor soil, and subjected to 
strong winds, the trees are generally too stunted to be of any value. 
In Hokkaido, however, conifers grow lu:icuriantly, and many primitive 
forests are found. The principal trees in these forests are Abies Sac ha- 
liensis Mast and Picca Ajanensis S\ et Z. Starting from altitudes of 
1,300 feet, in the southern parts of the island, these trees are found 
growing luxuriantly in the mountains of Ishikari, Teshio, Tokachi, 
Nemuro, and Kitami, and in the island of Kunajiri. The Crown 
Forests at Josankei and Kushiro, the State Forests at Shari and Ivun- 
ajiri consist of these trees alone. The timljer of Abies Sachaliensis. 
which is in large demand for architectural purposes, is indeed the most 
valuable of all the timber produced in Hokkaido. The wood is, how- 
ever, coarse-grained, and light, and is liable to warp when exposed to 
dryness and humidity. Rather close-grained and resinous, the Wood 
of Picca Ajanensis is in great demand for architectural works as well 
as for making chips for weaving braid hats and bonnets. 



230 Japanese Exhibition, 

Oil the whole, the different forest zones of Japan, as represented 
by their t}pical species, make the following percentages of the total 
forest area : 

Conifer forests 21% 

Broad-leafed tree forests 25% 

Conifers and broad -leafed tree forests 45% 

Thinlv stocked or devoid of trees 9% 

Total 100% 

Tht' Value of Forest Products. — The annual production of timber 
for three successive years (1900-1902) was 2,055,159,400 cubic feet, a 
greater part of which was consumed as building materials and for in- 
dustrial and mining purposes, while the rest was exported either as tim- 
ber or in the form of manufactured articles. The value of exports for 
the years 1901 and 1902 was 2,214,411 yen, and 2,452,896 yen, respec- 
tively, not including bamboos and other forest products and by-products. 
The last-mentioned products were exported to the value of 5,970,542 
yen in 1901, and 5,159,060 yen in 1902. 

Japan is now well prepared to ship her forest products to China, 
Korea and islands in the southern seas, which furnish good markets 
for timber. 

Exhibits, 
GROUP Hi Arundinaria Narihira, Maki- 

Af>pllances and Processes Used in "^ (Narihiratake). 

Forestry. Arundinaria Quadrangiuris, 

I. Forestry Bureau, Department Makino ( Shikakutake ) . 

of Airriculture and Coin- Arundinaria Simoni S. et Z. 

merce\ Tokyo — Riv. (medake). 

(I) Herbariums of important Arundinaria Simoni S. et Z. 

Japanese bamboos : ^'^ar. Chino Makino (Ha- 

Arundinaria Hidsii. konedake). 

Munro ( Kanzanchiku ). Arundinaria totisk, Makino 

Arundinaria. Hindsii. munro. (Tochiku). 

Var. Graminea, Bean. Bambusa nana roxb (Howo- 

Var. (jraminea, Bean (Taimin- chiku). 

chiku). Bambusa nana roxb, Var. 

Anmdinaria Japonica Sieb. et Normalis, Makino (Horai- 

' z. (Yadake). chiku). 

Anmdinaria Marmorea, Maki- Bambusa nana, Senanensis Fr. 

no (Kanchiku). et Lav. (Susutake). 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



231 



Phvllostachvs Bambusoides S. 

et Z. (Madake). 
Ph. Bambusoides S. et Z. var. 

aurea makino (Hoteichiku). 
Ph. Bambusoides S. et Z. var. 

Marliaclae, Makino ( Shi- 

bochiku ) . 
Ph. Bambusoides S. et Z. var 

Castillonis, Makino ( Kim- 

meichiku). 
Ph. mitis Riv. (Mosochiku). 
Ph. mitis Riv. var. heterocvcla, 

Makino ( Kikkochiku ) . 
Ph. puperula munro (Hachi- 

ku). 
Ph. puperula munro var. Bor- 

yana makino (Unmonchi- 

ku). 
Ph. pub. munro, var. nigra, 

Makino (Kurochiku). 
Ph. pub. munro var. nigra 

Makino, forma, nigro-punc- 

tata, Makino (Gomadake). 
Sasa, poniculata, Makino et 

Shibata ( Xemagaridake ) . 
Sasa poniculata, var. (Shako- 

hanchiku ) . 

(II) Herbariums of important 
Japanese forest trees : 

(a) Conifers: 

Ginkgoaceae. 

Ginkgo biloba L. (Icho). 

Taxaceae. 

l^odacarpus chinensis wall 

(Maki). 
Podacarpus Nageia R. Br. 

(Nagi). 
Cephalotaxus drupacea, S. et 

Z. (Inugaya). 
Torreya nucifera, S. et Z. 

(Kaya). 



Taxus cuspidata, S. et Z. 

(Ichii). 
Pinaceae. 
Pinus densiflora, S. et Z. (Ak- 

amatsu). 
Pinus thunbergii pall (Kuro- 

matsu). 
Pinus Koraiensis S. et Z. 

(Chosenmatsu). 
Pinus Porvi, S. et Z. (Hime- 

komatsu). 
Pinus pumila, pall (Haima- 

tsu). 
Larix leptolepis, Gord. (Kara- 

matsu). 
Larix dahurica, turcz. var. 
Japonica max ( Shikotamatsu ) . 
Picea hondoensis, mayr. (To- 

hi). 
Larrix polita carr. (Harigiri). 
Larrix bicolor. mayr. (Matsu- 

hada). 
Larrix ajanensis, Fisch. (Ezo- 

matsu). 

Larrix Glehni Mast. (Shinko- 
matsu). 

Tsuga sielx> Idi carr. (Tsuga). 

Tsuga diversifolia Max. (Ko- 
metsuga). 

Psendotsuga japonica, Shira- 
sa wa. ( Togasawara ) . 

Abies firma S. et Z. (Momi). 

Abies veitchii, Lindl. (Shi- 
rabe). 

Abies Mariesii, Mast. (Aomor- 
itodomatsu ) . 

Abies sachalinensis. Mast. 
(Todomatsu). 

Thujopsis dolabrata, S. et Z. 
(Asunaro). 



232 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Thuja japonica. Max. (Ku- 

robe). 
Chamaecyparis obtusa S. et Z. 

(Hinoki). 
Qiamaecyparis pisiefera S. et 

Z. (Sawara). 
Criptomeria japonica Don. 

(Sugi). 
Cunning"hamia sinensis R. Br. 

( Koyosan ) . 
Sciadopytis verticillata S. et Z. 

( Koyamaki ) . 
Juniperus rigida, S. et Z. (Ne- 

giimigashi). 
Juniperus Chinensis, L. (Biya- 

kushin). 
Juniperus Qiinensis L. var. 

procumbens Ec. (Haibiya- 

kushin). 

(b) Broad leafed trees: 

Platycarpa strobilacea S. et Z. 

(Sawagurumi). 
Juglans sieboldiana, maxim. 

(Oni-gurumi). 
Juglans regia. L. var. sinensis 

cas. (Teichi-gurumi). 
Juglans cordiformis, maxim. 

( Himegurumi ) . 
Myricaceae. 
Myrica rubra. S. et Z. (Yama- 

momo) . 
Salicaceae. 
Poplus tremula, L. var. villosa 

Wesm. (Yamanarashi). 
Poplus balsamifera, L. var. 

suaveolens loud. (Dero). 
Salix Buergeriana, mig. (Osa- 

ruko- Yanagi ) . 
Salix Caprea, L. var. multiner- 

vis Fr. et. Sav. (Kori- Yan- 
agi). 



Salix japonica, thunb. (Shiba- 

yanagi ) . 
Salix 'Nipponica F. et Sav. 

(Tachi- Yanagi). 
Salix Viminalis L. (Kinu- 

Yanagi ) . 
Salix apaca, Anders (Onoye- 

yanagi ) . 
Betulaceae. 
Carpinus laliflora, Bl. (Aka- 

shide). 
Carpinus Yedoensis, Max. 

(Inu-shide.) 
Carpinus japonica, Bl. (Kuma- 

shide). 
Ostrya japonica, Sargent 

(Asada). 
Betula alba. L. var. communis 

Rgl. (Ma-kamba). 
Betula alba, L. var. vulgaris 

E)c. (Shirakamba). 
Betula cor>'lifolia, Rgl. et 

Max. ( Uraj iro-kamba ) . 

Betula Ermanni, Cham, var. 
nipponica. max. (Take-kam- 
ba). 

Betula globispica, shirai (Zizo- 
kamba). 

Betula Maximowicziana, Rgl. 
(Udai-kamba). 

Betula Bhojpattra, wall. var. 
typica Rgl. (Ono-ore). 

Alnus. Japonica, S. et Z. 
( Hannoki ) . 

Alnus viridis, Dc. var. sibrica, 
Rgl . ( M iy ama-hannoki ) . 

Al. incana, willd, var. glauca 
ait ( Yama-hannoki ) . 

Al. glutinosa, willd.- (Kawara- 
hannoki ) . 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



233 



Al. emerginate, Shirai (Yaha- 

zu-hannoki ) . 
Al. firma, S. et L. (Yasha- 

bushi ) . 
Al. firma S. et Z. v.ar. multi- 

nervia, Rgl. (Himeyasha- 

bushi). 
Fagaceae. 
Fagus sylvatica, L. var. sie- 

boldi. Max. ( Buna-no-ki ) . 
Fagus japonica, Max. (Inu- 

buna). 
Castanea vulgaris Lam. var. 

japonica, Dc. (Kuri). 
Pasania cuspidata, Oerst. 

(Shiinoki). 
Pas. glabra, Oerst. (Mate- 

bashi ) . 
Quercus glandulifera, Bl. 

(Konara). 
Quercus grosseserrata Bl. 

(Midzunara). 
Quercus Crispula, Bl. (On- 

ara). 
Quercus alieua, Bl. (Nara- 

gashiwa). 

Quercus dentata, thunb. 
(Kashiwa). 

Quercus Variabilis, Bl. (Abe- 
maki). 

Quercus serrata, thunb. (Ku- 
nugi). 

Quercus acuta, thunb. ( Aka- 
" gashiwa). 

Quercus vibrayeana, fr. et 
' Sav. (Urashirogashi). 

Quercus Glauca, thunb. (Ara- 
kashi). 

Quercus Myrsinaefolia, Bl. 
(Shirakashi). 



Quercus Sessifolia, Bl. (Tsu- 

kubanegashi ) . 
Quercus Phyllizeoides, A. Gr. 

(Imamegashi). 
Quercus Gilva, BL (Ichii- 

gashi). 
Quercus thalassica, Hcl. 

( Shirifukagashi) . 
Ulmaceae. 
Ulnus campestris, Sm. var. 

laevis, planch. (Harunire). 
Ulnus campestris Sm. var. vul- 
garis, planch. (Kobunire). 
Ulnus parvifolia, Jacg. (x\ki- 

nire). 
Zelkowa acuminata, Lindl. 

(Keyaki). 
Celtis sinensis, pers. (Enoki). 
Aphananthe aspera, planch. 

( Mukunoki ) . 
Moraceae. 
Morus alba, L. var. stylosa, 

bur. (Kuwa). 
Cedrania triloba, Hcl. (Hari- 

Riri). 
Ficus erecta, thunb. (Inu- 

biwa.) 
Ficus wightiana, wall. var. ja- 
ponica, Miq. (Ako). 
Ficus retusa, L. var. nitida, 

Miq. (Gatsumaru). 
Proteaceiae. 
Helicia lancifolia, S. et Z. 

( Yamamogashi). 
Magnoliaceae. 

Magnolia hypoleuca, S. et Z. 
( Hono-ki ) . 

Magnolia Kobus. D. .C. ( Ko- 
bushi). 

Magnolia parviflora S. et Z. 
(Oyamarenge). 



2i4 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Magnolia Salicifolia, Max. 

( Tamamushi ) . 
Michelia compressa, Max. 

(Ogatamanoki). 
Illicium Anisatum, L. (Shiki- 

mi). 
Trochodendroceae. 
Cercidiphyllum japonicum, S. 

et Z. (Katsura). 
Euptelaea polyandra, S. et Z. 

(Fusa-zakura). 
Trochodendron aralioides, S. 

et Z. (Yama-guruma). 
Berberidaceae. 
Berberis thunbergii, Dc. (Me- 

Nandina domestica. thunb. 

(Nanten). 
Menispermaceae. 
Cocculus laurifoliums Dc. 

( Koshiu-Uyaku). 
Lauraceae. 
Cinnamon camphora, Xees 

( Kusunoki ) . 
CinnaiTiomum pedunculatum, 

Nees ( Yabu-nikkei ) . 
Machilus thunbergii, S. et Z. 

( Tabu ) . 
Machilus thunbergii, S. et Z. 

var. japonica, Yatabe (Awo- 

gashi). 
Litsea glauca, sieb. (Shiro- 

damo). 
Litsea japonica, Juss. (Hama- 

biwa). 

Lindera strychnifolia, Vill 
(Tundai-Uyaku). 

Lindera triloba, Bl. (Shiro- 
mo j i ) . 

Lindera obtusiloba, FJl. (Dan- 
kobai). 



Lindera umbellata, thunb. 

{ Kanakuginoki ) . 
Lindera praecox, Bl. (Abu- 

rachan ) . 
Lindera glauca, BL (Yama- 

kobashi). 
Lindera sericea, Bl. (Kuro- 

moji). 
Actinodaphne laucifolia Meisn. 

(Kago-Kashi). 
Saxifragaceae. 
Deutzia scabra, thunb. (Utsu- 

gi). 
Deutzia gracilis, S. et Z. (Hi- 

meutsugi). 
Hydrangea paniculata. Sieb. 

(Xori-utsugi). 
Pittosporaceae. 
Pittosporum tobira (Tobaran- 

oki). 
Distylium racemosum, S. et Z. 

(Isu). 
Rosaceae. 
Pirus Aria fihrh. (Urajiro- 

noki ) . 

Pirus Toringo Sieb. (Zunei). 

Pirus Miyabei, Sargent. (Asu- 
kinashi). 

Pirus Aucuparia, Gaerten. var. 
japonica, Maxim (Nanaka- 
mado) . 

Pirus Sambucifolia, Ch. et 
Schl. (Miyama.-nanakama- 
do). 

Pirus Macrophylla S. et Z. 
(Bakuchinoki). 

Prunus Grayana, Maxim 
( Uvvanuzuzakura) . 

Prunus Sciori, Fr. Schin. 
(Shuri). 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



235 



Primus Buergeriana, Miq. 

(Inuzakura). 
l^runus Pseiulo-cerasus Lmdl. 

var. Spontanea, Max. (Ya- 

mazakura). 
Primus Spinulosa S. et Z. 

( Rinboku ) . 
Primus Incisa, thunb. (Mame- 

zakura). 
Photinia villosa, Dc. (Kamat- 

suka ) . 
Photinia Glabra, thunb. (Kam- 

amemochi). 
Amelanchier Asiatica C. Koch 

(Zaifurilx)ku). 
Kerria japonica. Dc. (Yama- 

buki). 
Rhaphiolq)sis japonica, S. et 

Z. (Sarinubei). 
Atephanandra Flexuoso S. et 

Z. ( Kogome-Utsugi ) . 
Leguminosae. 

Sdphora japonica, L. (Enjin). 
Saphora Platycarpa, Max. 

(Fujiki). 
Cadrastis Amurensis B. et H. 

var. floribunda Max ( Inuen- 

Jiu). 
Albizzia Julibrissin, Boiv. 

(Nemunoki). 
(ilecfitschia Japonica, maq. 

(Saikachi). 
Rutaciae. 
Zanthoxylum Piperitum, Dc. 

fSansho). 
Zanthoxylum Schimifolium S. 

et Z. (Inuzansho). 

Orixa Japonica, thunb. (Ko- 
kusagi ) . 

Phyllodendron Amurense, 

Kupr. (Kiwada). 



Simarubaceae. 

Picrasma .Quassioides, Benn 

(Xigaki). 
Meliaceae. 

Melia Japonica, Don. (Sen- 
dan). 
Euphoibiaceae. 
Daphniphillum Glaucesens, Bl. 

( Hime-yuzuriba) . 
Mallotus Japonica, Muel. Arg. 

( Akamegashiwa) . 
Excoecaria Japonica, Muel. 

Arg. (Shiraki). 
Buxaciae. 
Buxus Semperivirens, L. (As- 

amatsuge). 
Anacardiaseae*. 
Rhusvemicifera D. C. (Uru- 

shi). 
Rhus. Aricbocarpa, Miq. (Ya- 

maurusbi). 
Rhus. Succidanea L. (Hazen- 

oki). 
Rhus. Silvestris S. et Z. (Ya- 

mahaze). 
Rhus. Semi-alata Mur. var. 

Osbeci D. C. (Fushinoki). 
Aquifoliaceae. 
Ilex crenata, thunb. (Inut- 

suge ) . 

Ilex Pedunculosa, Mig. (So- 
yogo). 

Ilex Pldhami, Miq. (Nana- 
minoki ) . 

Celasbraceae. 

Euonymus Alatas, C. Koch 
(Nishikigi). 

Euonymus Japonica, thunb. 
(Masaki). 

Staphyleaceae. 



236 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Staphylea Bumalda, S. et Z. 

( Mitsuba-Utsugi ) . 
Euscaphis Japonica, Pax. 

(Gonzui). 
Aceraceae. 
Acer Palmatum, thunb. 

(Kaede). 
Acer Tschonoskii, Max. (Min- 

ekaede ) . 
Acer Micranthum, S. et Z. 

( Komine-Kaede) . 
Acer Parisflorum, Fr. et Sav. 

(Tetsukaede). 
Acer Pictum, thunb. var. 

Mono, Max. ( Itayakaede ) . 
Acer Spictum Lam, var. Uku- 

riinduens, Max. (Ogara- 

bana). 
Acer Japonicum, thunb. ( Hau- 

chiwakaede). 
Acer Argentum, maxim (Asa- 

nohakaede). 
Acer Crataegi- folium S. et Z. 

(Meurinoki). 
Acer (jinnala, Maxim (Kara- 

kogi kaede). 

Acer Distvlium S. et Z. ( Hito- 
tsubakaede). 

Acer Xikoense, Max. (Megu- 
surinoki). 

Acer Carpinifolium, S. ct Z. 
( Yamashibakaede ) . 

Acer Rufinerve S. et Z. ( L'rin- 
oki). 

Hippocastanaceae. 

Aesculus Turbinata, Bl. 
(Tochinoki). 

Sapindaceae. 

Sapindus Mukurosi, (laert. 
(Mukuroji). 



Koebrenteria Paniculata, 

laxm. (Mokugenji). 
Sabinaceae. 
Meliosma Myrianatha, S. et Z. 

(Awabuki). 
Meliosma Tenuis, Maxim (Mi- 

yamahosho). 
Meliosma Pungens, Wall. 

(Yamabiwa). 
Rhamnaceae. 
Berchemia Racemosa, S. et Z. 

(Kumayanagi). 
Rhamnus Crenata, S. et Z. 

(Isonoki). 
Hovenia Dulcis Thunb. (Kem- 

4X)nashi ) . 
Microhamnus F^ranguloides, 

Max. ( Xekonochichi ) . 
Elacocarpaceae. 
Elaciocarpus Photinifolia K. et 

A. (Mogashi). 
Elaciocarpus Japonica S. et Z. 

( Kobanmochi ) . 
Tiliaccae. 

Tilia Cordata Mill, var. japon- 
ica Miq. (Shinanoki). 
Tilia Miqueliana, Max. (Bo- 

daijiu). 
Tilia Maximoswicziana, Shira- 

sawa (Obanobodaijiu). 
Tilia Kusiana, Makino et Shir- 

asawa (Heranoki). 
Theaceae. 
Thea Japonica L. nois (Tsu- 

baki ) . 
Stewartia Pseudo-camellia, 

Max (Xatsutsubaki). 

Eurva Ochanacea Szvsz (Sa- 
kaki ) . 

Eurya Japonica, thunb. (Hasa- 
kaki ) . 



International Exposition. St. Louis, 1904. 



237 



Flacourtiaceae. 

Idesia Polycarpa, Max. (li- 

giri). 
Elaeagnaceae. 
Elaeagnus umbellata, thunb. 

(Akigumi). 
Lvthraceae. 
Lagerstroemia Indica, L. (Sa- 

rusuberi). 
Rhizophoraceae. 
Jambosa V'ulgiiris, D. C. (Fu- 

tomono). 
Araliaceae. 
Fatsea Japonica, Done et Plane 

(Yatsude). 
Aralia Sinensis L. (Taranoki). 
Dendoropanax Japonicum, 

Seen. ( Kakuremino) . 
Acanthopanax Ricini-boHum 

S. et Z. (Harigiri). 
Acanthopanax Sciadophyl- 

loides, Fr. et Sav. (Koshia- 

bura). 
Acanthopanax Innovans, S. et 

Z. (Takanotsume). 
Comaceae. 
Cornus Kousa, Buerg. (Yama- 

lx)shi). 
Cornus Officinalis S. et Z. 

(Sanshiju). 
Cornus Macrophylla Wall. 

(Mizuki). 

Cornus Ignorata, C. Koch 

( Kumanomizuki ) . 
Marlea Platanifolia S. et Z. 

( Urinoki ) . 

Aucuba Japonica, thunb. 
(Aoki). 

Clethraceae. 

Clethra Barbinorvis S. et Z. 
( Ryobu ) . 



Ericaceae. 

Rhododendron Metternichii, S. 

et Z. (Shakunagi). 
Rhododendron Keiskei, Miq. 

(Hekagitsutsuji). 
Tripetaleia Paniculata, S. et Z. 

(Hotsutsuji). 
Pieris Japonica D. Don (Ase- 

bi). 
Sapotaceae. 
Syderoxylon Ferrugineum H. 

et A. (Akatetsu). 
Symploceae. 
Symplocos Crataegoides Ham. 

(Sawafutagi), 
Symplocos Myrtacea S. et Z. 

(Hainoki). 

Symplocos Prunifolia S. et Z. 

(Kurobai). 
Styracaceae. 
Halesia Corymbosa. B. et H. 

(Asagara). 
Sty rax Japonica S. et Z. 

(Egonoki). 
Sty rax Obassia S. et Z. (Ha- 

kuunboku). 
Oleaceae. 

Flaxinus Bungiana Dc. var. 
Pubinervis \Vg. (Toneriko. ) 

Flaxinus Longicuspis S. ct Z. 
(Aotago). 

Flaxinus Sieboldiana Bl. (Shi- 
oji). 

Ligustrum Ibota, Sieb. (Ibo- 
ta). 

Ligustrum Japonicum, thunb. 
( Xezumimochi ) . 

Osmanthus Aquifolium B. et 
H. (Hiiragi). 

Borrajinaceae. 



238 



Japanese Exhibition. 



Ehretia Macrophylla Wall 

( Marubachishanoki ) . 
Scrophlariaceae. 
Paulownia Imperiaris S. ct Z. 

(Kiri). 
liignoniaceae. 
Catalpa Kaempferi S. et Z. 

(Kisasage). 
Caprifoliaceae. 
Viburnum Dilatum thunb. 

(Gamazumi). 
Viburnum Sieboldi Miq. (Go- 
magi ) . 
Viburnum Tomentosum thunb. 

( Yabudemari). 
Viburnum Phlebotrichum S. et 

Z. (Otako-yozome). 
Viburnum Opulus L. (Kam- 

boku). 
Viburnum Furcatum Bl. 

(Mushikari). 
N'iburnum Odoratissimum 

Ker. (Sangojiu). 

(Ill) Dried specimens of im- 
portant Japanese forest tree 
seedlings : 

Cryptomeria Jaf)onica, Don. 

( Sugi ) . 
Pinus thunbergii Pari (Kuro- 

matsu ) . 

Pinus Densiplora S. et Z. 
(Akamatsu). 

Chamaecyjparis Pisifera S. et 
Z. (Sawara). 

Chamaecyjparis Obtusa S. et 

Z. (Hinoki). 
Quercus Glandulifera 1>1. (Ko- 

nara). 
Quercus Myrsinaefolia P>1. 

(Shirakashi). 



Zelkowa Keaki, Sieb. (Kea- 

ki). 
Cinnamomum Camphora 

Nees. (Kusu). 
Castanea Vulgaris L. var. Ja- 

ponica D. C. (Kuri). 

(IV) Working plan in the state 
forest of Awomori forest re- 
reserve : 

Model of the state forest, 
Uchinappe. 

Fourteen photographs of the 
forest of Uchinappe : views : 
felling, sawing and trans- 
portation. 

A graphic representation of 
the section of Thujopsis Do- 
labrata, S. et Z., in the above 
forest. 

Two grapliic representations 
of the vield of the alx>ve for- 
est. 

Seven railway sleepers, for 
specimens of the durability 
of the same wood. 

Two cleared logs. 

Two cleared pillars. 

Six planks of the same. 

(V) Working plan in the pri- 
vate forest of Yoshino, Va- 
mato — 

Twenty-four photographs of 
the views, felling, sawing 
and transportation carried 
on in the Yoshino forest. 

One graphic representation of 
the sections of a cryptomeria 
Japonica, Don, in the same 
forest. 

One topography of Yoshino 
forest. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



239 



One graphic representation of 
the yield of the above forest. 

Ten cleared logs of crypto- 
meria Japonica, Don, in Yo- 
shino forest. 

Twelve logs of the same with 
bark, for staves to make tubs 
and casks. 

Two barks of cryptomeria Ja- 
ponica for roofing. 

Map of the distribution of for- 
ests in Japan. 

Chart showing the yield of 
wood in Japan by different 
forest reserves. 

Diagram of the yield and ex- 
penses of the state forests in 
Japan. 

Qiart showing the forest area 
by different forest reserves. 

Chart showing the locality of 
the state forests where re- 
plantation of trees is ef- 
fected. 

Statistical table showing the 
import and export of forest 
products in Japan. 

Diagram showing forestry ed- 
ucation in Japan. 

Diagram showing the history 
of the management of the 
state forest in Japan. 

Eighty-six photographs of for- 
ests by different zones. 

Damming of torrents and de- 
forestation to improve do- 
main land, forest reserve of 
Hiroshima. 

2. Formosan Government, Tai- 
hokn — 

Photographs of forest. 



3. Ikeda, Jirokichi, Tokyo — 

Japanese forest seeds. 

Quercus Serrata Bl. (Kunugi). 

Quercus Glandulifera Bl. (Na- 

ra). 
Quercus Acuta Thunh. (Aka- 

gashi). 
Quercus Myrsinaefolia Bl. (Shi- 

rakashi ) . 
Quercus Dentata, thunb, (Kash- 

iwa. 
Aphananthe Aspera. planch. 

( Mukuenoki ) . 
Sapindus Mukuroji, Gaet. (Mu- 

kuroji). 
Fraxinus Sieboldiana Rupr. 

(Shioji). 
Paulowinia Imperiaris, S. et Z. 

(Kiri). 
Cercis Sinensis. Pers. (Enoki). 
Castanea V^dgaris L. var. Japon- 
ica. 
Grant variety (Tanbakuri). 
Castanea Butsh-var. ( Shiha- 

kuri). 
Albizzia Julibrissin. Boiv. (Xe- 

munoki ) . 
Taonabo Jaix>nica, Szysz (Mok- 

koku ) . 
Ilex Latifolia, thunb. (Tarayo). 
Pasania Cuspidata, Oerst. (Shii). 
Pasania Glabra, Oerst (Mate- 

bashii). 
Gardenia Florida L. (Kuchi- 

nashi). 
Diospyros Kaki L. F. (Kaki). 
Magnolia Hypoleuca S. et Z. 

(Ho). 

Magnolia Kobus, Dc. (Kobushi). 

(jleditschia Japonica Miq. ( Sai- 
kachi). 



240 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Rhus Vernicifera, Dc. (Urushi). 
Rhus Semi-alata, Murr (Xu- 

rude). 
Tilia cordata, Mill (Shinanoki). 
Fagus Sylvatica L. (Buna). 
Aesculus turbinata, Bl. (Tochi). 
Cercidiphllum Japonica S. et Z. 

(Katsura). 
Melia Japonica Don (Sendan). 
Horenia Dulcis thunb. (Kempo- 

nashi). 
Sophora Japonica, L. (Yenji). 
Aleurites Cordata Muell Arg 

(Aburagiri). 
Listea Aciculata Bl. (Shiro- 

damo). 
Quercus Phyllireoides, gr. 

( Ubamrgashi ) . 
Juglans Cordiformis, Max. (Hi- 

mekurumi). 
Ligustrum Japonicum, thunb. 

(Xezumimochi). 
Cinnamomum Laureirii Nees 

(Nikkei). 
Styrax Obassia S. et Z. (Haku- 

unboku ) . 
Larix Leptolepis (jord ( Kara- 
mat su). 
Juniperus Sinensis (Xedzumisa- 

shi). 
Chamaecyparis Pisifera S. et Z. 

( Sawara ) . 
Padocarpus Xageia R. Br. 

( N'agi ) . 
Pinus Parviflora, S. et Z. (Hi- 

mekomatsu ) . 
Al)ies Firma S. et Z. (Momi). 
Tsuga Sicboldi, Carr. (Tsuga). 

Picea Hondoensis, Mayr. (To- 

hi). 
Abies veitchi, Lindl. (Shirabe). 



Abies Sachalinensis, Mast. (To- 

domatsu). 
Picea Ajanensis, Fisch. (Yezo- 

matsu). 
Cunninghamia sinensis R. Br. 

( Koyasan ) . 
Pinus Koraiensis S. et Z. (Toho- 

senmatsu). 
Taxus Cuspidata S. et Z. (Ichii). 
Torreya Nucifera S. et Z. 

(Kaya). 

4. IVatase Torajiro, Tokyo^- 
Japanese forest tree seeds. 
Cinnamon Campliora, Nees (Ku- 

su). 
Sterculia Platan i folia, L. (Aogi- 

ri). 
Citrus trifoliata, L. (Karatachi). 
Alnus Japonica S. et Z. (Han- 

noki ) , 
Edgeworthia cheysanita, Lindl. 

(Mitsumata). 
Morus Albra, L. (Kuwa). 
Acerpalmatum, thunb. (Kaide). 
Zelvvawa Keaki, Sieb. Lindl. 

(Keaki). 
Thea Sinensis, L. (Cha). 
Thea Jaix>nica, L. (Tsubaki). 
Juglans Regia, L. (Kurumi). 
Pinus densiflora S. et Z. (Aka- 

matsu ) . 
Pinus Thunbergii Pari (Kuro- 

matsu ) . 
Crvptomeria Japonica Don (Su- 

Cliamace-cyparis Obutusa S. et 

Z. (Hinoki). 
Thunjopsis Dolabrata S. et Z. 

(Hiba). 
Sciadopitis Verticellata S. et Z. 

(Koya-maki). 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



241 



Ginkgo Biloba, L. (Icho). 
Torreya nucifera S. et Z. 

(Kaya). 
Larix Leptolepsis, Gord. (Kara- 

matsu). 
Pinus Pehtaphylla, Mayr. (Go- 

yomatsu). 

GROUP Its* 

Products of the Cultivation of For- 
ests and of Forest Industries. 

1. Abe, Yonosuke, Hokkaido — 
Specimens of woods used in con- 
struction : 

Picea ajanensis Fisch (Ezo- 

matsu). 
Abies Sachalinensis, Mast. (To- 

domatsu). 
Acanthopanax ricinifolium, S. et 

Z. (Hariguri). 
Fraxinus Mandshurica, Rupr. 

(Yachitamo). 
Cercidiphyllum Japonicum, S. et 

Z. (Katsura). 
Juglans sieboldiana, Max. (Ku- 

rumi). 

2. Aboshidani, Yoshimatsu, 

Kobe— 
Turpentine. 

3. Aomori-ken Akebi-vine Bas- 

ket Workers Association, 
Aomori-ken — 
Baskets and other works of 
Akebi-vines. 

4. Arai, Taiji, Taihokiiy For- 

mosa — 
Keteleeria. 

5. Chiam-o-sai, Taiho-kn, For- 

mosa — 
Bamboo. 



6. Cho-pian-in, Taiho-ku, For- 

mosa — 

Bamboo. 

7. Dokura, Tatsujiro, Shinko — 

Libosidrus. 
Machilus thunbergii. 

8. Forestry Bureau, Department 

of Agriculture and Com- 
merce, Tokyo — 

Specimens of the important Jap- 
anese bamboos : 

Arundinaria hindusii Munro 

(Kauzanchi-ku). 
Arundinaria var. • graminea 

Bean (Taiminchi-ku). 
Arundinaria Quadrangularis 

Makino (Shikakudake). 
Arundinaria Japonica S. et Z. 

(Yadake). 
Arundinaria Marmoria makino 

(Kanchi-ku). 
Arundinaria Narihira makino 

(Narihiradake). 
Arundinaria Totsik makino 

( Tochi-ku ) . 
Arundinaria Simoni Riviere, 

var. chino makino (Hakone- 

dake). 
Arundinaria Narihira, makino, 

var. (Yashadake). 
Arundinaria Simoni, Riviere 

(Medake). 

Bambusa nana var. Normalis 
makino (Horaichiku). 

B. palmata, marliac forma 
nebulosa makino (Shako- 
hanchiku). 

Phyllostachys Bambusoides 
Siedit Zucc. var. auria ma- 
kino (Hoteichiku). 



242 



Japanese Exhibition, 



PhyllosUchys Banibusoides S. 
et Z. var. castillonis makino 
(Kinmeichiku). 

Ph. B. S. et Z. var. Marliacca 
(Shibochiku). 

Ph. Mitis Riviere (Mosochi- 
ku). 

Ph. Mitis Riviere var. hetero- 

cycla, makino (Kikkochi- 

ku). 
Ph. Pubemla Munro (Hachi- 

ku). 
Ph. Pubemla Munro var. Ni- 

frvB. makino, forma nigra 

Pun ctata makino ( Goma- 

dake). 
Ph. Pubemla Munro var. Bor- 

yana makino (Unmonchi- 

ku). 
Ph. Pubemla Munro var. Ni- 

jrra (Kurochiku). 
Sasa Paniculata makino (Ne- 

magarchiku). 
Sasa Rorealis makino et Shi- 

bata (Suzudake). 
Sasa Poniculata var. (Torafu- 

dake). 

Important wood for building: 

Pinus densiflora, S. et Z. (Ak- 

amatsu). 
Chamaecyparis Obtusa. S. et 

Z. (Hinoki). 
Cryptomeria Japonica Don. 

( Sugi ) . 
Abies Sachalinemsis mast (To- 

domatsu). 
Picea Hondoensis mayr 

(Tohi). 
Larix Leptolepis, Gord. (Ka- 

ramatsu ) . 



Tsuga Sieboldi, Carr. (Tsu- 

ga). 
Abies firma, thunb. (Momi). 
Cercidiphyllum Japonica S. et 

Z. (Katsura). 
l'>axinus mandshurca, Rupr. 

(Yachitamo). 
Acanthopanax Ricini folium. S. 

et Z. (Sen). 
Cladrastis Amurensis B. et H. 

var. floribunda max (En- 

jiu). 
Castanea Vulgaris var. Jap, 

Dc. (Kuri). 
Zelkowa Keaki, Sieb. ( Keaki ) . 
Aesculus turbinata, Bl. (To- 

chi). 
Juglans regia, I. (Kurumi). 

Planks of important Japanese 
woods : 

Zelkowa Keaki, Sieb. (Keaki). 
Juglans Sieboldiana, max. 

(Kurumi). 
Morus Alba, L. (Kuwa). 
Cerci-diphyllum Japonicum S. 

et Z. (Katsura). 
Cinnamomum Camphora, nees. 

(Kusunoki). 
Fraxinus Mandshurica, Rupr. 

(Yachitamo). 

Phillodendron Amurense, 

Rupr. (Kiwada). 

Magnolia hypolenca, S. et Z. 
( Honoki ) . 

Aesculus turdinata, Bl. (Toch- 
inoki). 

Acer palmatum, thunb. 
(Kaede). 

Prunus Pseudo-cerasus, Lindl. 
(Yamazakura). 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



243 



Cedrela Chimarsis, Jiiss. 

(Chanchin). 
Paulownya Imperiaris thunb. 

(Kuri). 
Fagxis sylvatica, Sieboldi (Bu- 

nanoki). 
Diospyros Kaki, 1. f. (Kaki). 
Melia Japonica, Don. (Sen- 
dan). 
Ouercus Acuta, thunb. (Aka- 

gashi). 
Machilus thunbergii S. et Z. 

(Tabunoki). 
Quercus crispula, Bl. (Onara). 
Cryptomeria Japonica, Don. 

mit fines grains (Yakusu- 

gi)- 
Taxus Cuspidata S. et Z. 

(Ichii). 
Gingko Biloba, L. (Icho). 
Cryptomeria Japonica, Don. of 

special kind (Jindaisugi). 

Crude camphor. 

Refined camphor: amorphous, 
pulverized and compressed. 

Camphor oil : white, red and 
black. 

Varnish. 

Turpentine. 

Saffrol. 

Distrifector obtained in the sej)- 
arations of camphor. 

Photographs, etc. 

Staves of oaks for casks and bar- 
rels. 

Made barrels. 

Assortment of chip. 

Different kinds of woods to ob- 
tain chip. 

Chip braids and bonnets thereof. 



9. Formosan Government, Tai- 
hoku, Formosa — 

Specimens of timber. 
Camphor and its by-products. 
Specimens of bamboos. 

10. Fitkiai Camphor RcHning 

Factory, Kobe — 
Refined camphor. 

11. Furuyama Cliiushichi, Osa- 

ka- 
Bird Lime. 

12. Giam-hai Kagi, Formosa — 
Phyllostachys quilioi. 



13. Hakone Products Association, 
Kanagawa- 
Wood mosaics. 



Kanagawa-ken — 



14. Hokkaido Joint Stock Lumber 

Co., Hokkaido — 

Specimens of timbers produced 

in Hokkaido. 
Staves and barrels. 

15. Hokkaido Wood Chip Fac- 

tory, Hokkaido — 

Assortment of chip-relief kasumi, 
Kasumi, poplar Kasumi, pop- 
lar relief, fibre, etc. 

t6. Kimura, Kumajiro, Shiga- 
ken — 
Bamboo roots for whips — most- 
ly of phyllostachys bambuso- 
ides and ph. pupenda, etc. 

17. Koga, Tatsushiro. Okinazva- 

ken — 
Leaf fans. 

18. Kohaze, Jirobei, Tokyo — 

Specimens of important Japan- 
ese timbers. 



244 



Japanese Exhibition, 



19. Kyoseisha Aheki-vine Work- 

ers* Association, Nagano- 
ken — 
liaskets and other works of Ake- 
bi-vines. 

20. Lim-goat-theng, Toroku — 
Bamboo Dandrocalamus latiflo- 

rus. 

21. Lim-pi, Taihoku — 
Bamboo. 

22. Mori, Chiujiro, Hokkaido — 
Match blocks. 

23. Miirotaniy Toshichi, Kobe — 
Japanese bamboos and their 

products : 
Fishing rods of white bamboos. 
White colored bamboos. 
Fishing rods of black bamboos. 
Black colored bamboos. 
Smoked and worked bamboos. 

24. N a gat a, Daisiike, Kobe — 
Japanese bamboos and their 

products : 
Fishing rods of yellow bamboos. 
Fishing rods of black bamboos. 
Black colored bamboos. 
Spotted bamboos. 
Leopard spotted bamboos. 
Amber-colored bamboos. 
Black bamboos with root head. 
Slender bamboos. 
Leopard spotted with root head. 
Amber-colored bamboos with 

root head. 
Fancy knotted bamboos. 
Kumazasa bamboos. 
Yellow bamboos. 
Giant bamboos. 
Handles of yellow bamboo. 
Handles of amber bamboo. 



Dark spotted bamboo. 
Finely grained bamboos. 
Smoked bamboos. 
Charred bamboos. 
Artificially spotted bamboos. 
Colored bamboos. 
Imitated black bamboos. 
Carved bamboos. 
A bamboo in pots, etc. 

25. Saito, Gishiro, Kobe — 
Japanese bamboos and their 

products : 
Colored bamboos. 
Artificially charred bamboos. 
Bamboo mattings. 
Bamboo blinds, etc. 

26. Shimidsn, Toyotaro, Hiroshi- 

ma-ken — 
Assortment of chip. 
Thin crape. 
Improved crape. 
Scaly crape. 
Crisped crape. 
Striped crape. 
Striped net works. 
Pressed narrow bands. 
Crape thread form. 
Plain chip braids. 
l^>onnet thereof. 

27. Shinkiugumi & Co., Kobe — 
Assortment of chip : 

Chip, colored and plain. 
Chip braids, bonnets thereof. 
Chip mattings. 
Chip baskets. 
Photographs, etc. 

28. Straw and Chip Braid Deal- 

ers' Association, Tokyo — 
Assortment of chip : 
Plain crape. 
Figured crape. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



24s 



Undulated, striped, brushed, 
pressed, twisted, printed, Ha- 
kata printed and tubelar chip, 
etc. 

Chip braids thereof. 

Different kinds of wood to get 
chip. 

29. Tanaka, Shokichi, Kanagawa- 

ken — 
Wood mosaics. 

30. Tan-tek'heng, Nanto, Formo- 

sa — 
Bamboo. 

31. Tiun-chni'hok, Nanto, For- 

mosa — 
Phyllostachys aurea. 

32. Todoroki, Kohei, Kobe — 
Match blocks. 

33. Tsukiyama, H ach i g o r 0, 

Kobe— 
Match blocks. 

34. Tsutsumi, Sanjiro, Hokkai- 

do — 
Chip for packing, etc. 

35. IVatanabe, Kanyemon, Kana- 

gawa-ken — 

Wood mosaics. 

36. Vamada, Sakuro, Hokkaido — 
Match blocks. 

37. Vamasaki, Shosuke, Nagano- 

ken--^ 
Bamboo works. 

38. Yoshikazva, Matabei, Osaka — 

Turpentine oil. 

Wood tar antiseptics and woods 
impregnated with the same. 



GROUP n4* 

Appliances for Gatherins: Wild 
Crops and Products Obtained* 

1. Chikiigo Vegetable Wax Co., 

Fukuoka-ken — 

Rhus beans and wax thereof. 

2. Forestry Bureau, Dept. of Ag- 

riculture and Commerce, To- 
kyo — 
Gall nuts, illustrations of gall 
insects, their development : 
Rhus semialata, mur, var. 
osbeschi. Affected by gall in- 
sects in different stages. 

3. Haga, Yahei, Yehime-ken — 
Vegetable wax. 

4. Higo Vegetable Wax Co,, Ku- 

mamoto-ken — 

Vegetable wax. 

5. Honda Uichiro Wax Co, — 
Vegetable wax. 

6. Jyoko, Otokichi, Yehime- 

ken — 
Vegetable wax. 

7. Kitagumi Ikeda Kawachi Co., 

Kobe— 
Rhus beans and vegetable wax 
thereof. 

8. Murakami, Chojiro, Yehime- 

ken — 
Vegetable wax. 

9. Noda, Bunji, Yehime-ken — 
Rhus beans and vegetable wax. 

10. Okada, Usaburo, Yehime- 
ken — 
Rhus beans and vegetable wax. 



246 



Japanese Exhibition, 



11. Okazqki, Yoncjiro, Vehime- 

kcu — 
Vegetable wax. 

12. Oita Vegetable Wax Dealers' 

Assoeiation, Oita-ken — 
Rhus beans, vegetable wax and 
candles thereof. 

13. Osaka Shiitake Mushroom 

Dealers' Association, Osa- 
ka — 
Shiitake mushrooms. 

14. Takasu Tin Food Co., Hiro- 

shima-ken — 
Mattake mushrooms and bamboo 
sprouts. 



15. T an- jit -sen g, Banshoryo, For- 

mosa — 
**Haushimen." 

16. Uranaka, Vojiro, Yehime- 

ken — 
Rhus beans and vegetable wax. 

17. Uyeda, Takezo, Osaka — 
Mattake mushrooms and Shimeji 

mushrooms. 

18. Yamazaki, Shinkichi, Kyoto — 
Mattake mushrooms and bamboo 

sprouts. 

19. Yoshishike, Zenjiro, Shinchi- 

ku, Formosor— 
"Shoro Tsuso." 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 247 



CHAPTER XI. 
Department of Mines and Metallurgy. 

Introductory Remarks. 

In this department, the Japanese Commission purposes to present 
some of the phases of the recent development of the mining 
industry and of the mineral resources of Japan. In order to com- 
ply with such purpose, the commission, except in the case of official 
exhibits, determined the personnel of exhibitors and the kinds of ex- 
hibits. Almost the whole of the exhibit in this department was col- 
lected and arranged by the Japan Mining Society, under the surveillance 
of the Commission. 

Geological Formation and Mining Deposits of Japan. — The geo- 
logical formation of the Japanese Islands may be briefly described as 
follows • In« the aqueous formations, those belonging to the Archaean 
are gneiss and crystalline schist systems, which are distributed over a 
very limited area, amounting to about 3.78 per cent of the total area; 
those belonging to the Paleozoic are the Triassic, Jurassic and Cre- 
taceous systems, which form 7.95 per cent ; and those belonging to the 
Caenozoic are the Tertiary and the Quaternary rocks, which form 
45.84 per cent, or nearly half of the total area. In the igneous rocks, 
those belonging to the older periods are granite, quartz, gabbro, dia- 
base, porphyry and porphyrite, which cover 11.27 P^^ ^^^'^t- ^^ 
eruption of granite is especially prominent in this formation, lliose 
belonging to the younger periods are andesite, basalt and liparite* which 
form 20.92 per cent. 

According to the investigation of the Bureau of Geological Survey, 
two-thirds of the country may be said to consist of rocks of younger 
periods and igneous rocks. This fact has important bearings upon 
the distribution of minerals in Japan. 

The following is a list of metal mines classified according to their 
geological ages: 

Those belonging to the Archaean system are : Kamioka and 
Mozumi silver-lead-copper mines, of Hida province; Besshi copper 
mine and Ichinokawa antimony mine, of lyo province; and Yoshioka 
copper mine of Bitchu province. 

Those belonging to the Palaeozoic system are: Hihira and Maki- 
niine copper mines, of Hyuga province; Goki copper mine, of Higo 



248 Japanese Exhibition, 

province; Kamaishi iron mine, of Rikuchu province; and Nakakosaka 
iron mine of Kotsuke province. 

Those belonging to the Mesozoic system are : Shikano antimony 
mine of Suwo province; Dogamura copper mine of Iwami province; 
Omotani copper mine, of Echizen province. 

Those belonging to the Cainozoic system are: Okozawa copper 
mine and Kosaka silver-copper mine, of Rikuchu province ; Innai silver 
mine and Ani and Arakawa copper mines, of Ugo province ; Hosokura 
silver-lead mine, of Rikuzen province ; Handa silver mine, of Iwashiro 
province; Ashio copper mine of Shimotsuke province; Okoyate copper 
mine, of Kaga province ; Sado gold-silver-copper mine, of Sado ; Ikuno 
gold-silver-copper mine, of Tajima province; Serigano gold-silver 
mine, of Satsuma province; Yamagano gold-silver mine, of Osumi 
province. 

« 

Development of Minin<:[ and Metallurgy in Japan. — Under the old 
regime, the mining industry of Japan was comparatively undeveloped. 
But since the opening of the new era, following the abolition of the 
military rule, 37 years ago, this industry has made such a rapid progress 
that it now forms one of the most important national resources. 

Early in the new period, the Government took the mining industry 
into its own hands and placed the Sado, Ikuno, Muoi, Ani, Kosaka» 
Kamaishi and Okusu metal mines, as well as the Takashima and Miike 
collieries under its direct control. Foreigners were employed and im- 
provements in various directions were effected. Foreign systems were 
adopted in mining, smelting, and transportation, and an example was 
set to private mining companies. At the same time, an engineering 
school was established for diffusing knowledge of mining and metal- 
lurgy. The result was a remarkable advance in these departments of 
scientific learning. 

Henceforth a large number of private operators imitated the Gov- 
ernment's enterprises. Although their undertakings were not invariably 
successful, the result was a remarkable development of the mining in- 
dustry in general. 

At this time, the most notable phenomenon was the activity of the 
petroleum industry. The sinking of wells was at first done by manual 
labor, but since the Japan Petroleum Joint-Stock Company introduced 
American oil-well boring machines with success in 1892, big strides 
have been made in the employment of machinery. Oil was formerly 
transported on men's shoulders, but a great improvement was effected 
in 1878 by the introduction of iron pipes. The private operators con- 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 249 

tributed much to the further development of the mining industry. The 
changes for the better, effected in recent years, are summarized below : 

1. The adoption of the rock drill with compressed air as motive 
power. 

2. The more extended use of dynamite and other powerful ex- 
plosives. 

3. The wire-rope tramway instead of human carriers. 

4. The hydraulic pumps and other new types of pumps. 

5. The automatic hauling machine adopted. 

6. The Huntington mill, Frue vanner, and Duncan concentrator 
adopted. 

7. Tlie water jacket furnace adopted. 

8. Electricity applied for driving machinery and to the refining 
of crude copper. 

9. The Bessemer, Augustine, Patera, Kiss, Russel, Oker process 
of refining adopted. 

10. Boilers, engines, and turbines of new types adopted. 

Condition of Mine Workers, — The total number of persons em- 
ployed in the Japanese mines was 146,939 in June, 1902, including 
miners, carriers, pickers, smelting men, machine tenders, iron workers, 
and pumpmen.^ Most of these laborers work underground and under 
uncomfortable circumstances, but in spite of these disadvantages, they 
are generally satisfied. These mine workers generally live in dwellings 
provided by their employers, those with families in separate rooms, and 
those without families in large common rooms. The dwellings are 
either thatched or tile-roofed, and the inside of the rooms is compara- 
tively clean. 

In case of accidents while on duty, their employers are bound to 
take care of them. The employers bear part of the whole of the ex- 
penses of medical attendance, and, when the patients are treated in 
hospitals other than those owned by the employers, they are daily paid 
a sum of money to meet the expenses of such hospitals. In case of 
their being disabled, they are given a fair amount of money, and in case 
of death, generally a sum is granted to the bereaved families to cover 
funeral expenses. 

In mines with a more perfect system, mine workers' mutual aid 
associations are in existence. The aim of these associations is to extend 
help to the members in case of emergency. To this end, reserve funds 
arc created by contribution from the members as well as from the mine 
operators or sympathizers, and disbursements are made from these 



250 



Japanese Exhibition, 



funds in case of injury, illness, or death of any of the members. Al- 
* though in small mines where only a small number of workmen arc em- 
ployed, no provision is made for the education of the miners* children ; 
in larger mines they are educated either in schools established by the 
mine owners or in public schools subsidized by the mine owners. The 
tuition fee is comparatively small. 

m 

One of the peculiar usages prevailing among miners is that of tak- 
ing the oaths of chiefs and proteges and of brethren, observed with re- 
ligious strictness. The instructions of the **boss" are expected to be 
obeyed, whether they are right or wrong. These chiefs are in intimate 
communication with each other, so that in case a miner goes from one 
mine to another seeking employment, etc., he is sure, if he gives the 
name of his chief, to be kindly treated. His new friends will go to no 
little trouble to find employment for him, and will often give him money 
to cover his traveling expenses. This peculiar spirit of fraternity is 
utilized for the control of miners, and it is difficult for the outsider to 
realize how implicitly the commands of these chiefs are obeyed and how 
well order is preserved. But this sympathy between the chief and the 
followers sometimes aggravates a fight between the chiefs themselves, 
and often brings about tragic incidents. Sometimes these retainers of 
a "boss" cause trouble to the latter's employers. Under such circum- 
stances one would suppose that strikes are of frequent occurrence. This 
is not the case. Strikes of miners are almost unheard of, although 
fights among them are sometimes reported. 

Statistics of the Mining Industry, — The following table shows the 
number and areas of mining concessions for four consecutive years : 

No., of Mining Area. 

Concessions. (Tsubo) 

1899 5,280 555*391,644 

1900. : 5,389 589,778,353 

1901 5,724 704,974,325 . 

1902 5,908 788,156,282 

The following table shows the number of mining concessions in, 
or not in, operation in each of the years specified: 

In Not in Percentage. 

Operation. Operation. In Not in 

(Tsubo) (Tsubo) Operation. Operation. 

1898 ....'. 253,604,003 242,245.290 51. 1 48.9 

1899 268,971,275 286,420,369 48.4 51.6 

1900 284,249,967 305,528,386 48.2 51.8 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 251 

The following table shows the annual outputs of principal mineral 
])roducts : 

Year. Gold Silver Copper Lead Iron 

(Momme) (Momme) (Kin) (Kin) (Kwan) 

1899 446,716 14,978,060 40^59,709 3,313,464 6,151,633 

1900 566,536 15,681,595 42,182,253 3,130,080 6,624,447 

1901 660,153 14,598,749 45,652,9-27 3,004,983 7,853,163 

1902 793,518 15,371,045 48,390,637 2,740,741 8,568,059 

Year. Antimony Manganese Coal Petroleum Sulphur 

(Kin) (Kin) (Ton) (Koku) (Koku) 

1899 1,568,462 18,803,440 6,721,798 474,406 17,002,186 

1900 716,477 26,384,526 7,429,457 767,092 24,064,196 

1901 911,463 27,115,884 9,027,325 983,799 27,580478 

1902 1,026,601 18,110,792 9,701.682 877,837 30,478,728 

The following table shows the amount of the annual exports of 
principal mineral products : 

Year. Copper Antimony Coal Sulphur Manganese 

(Kin) (Kin) (Kin) (Kin) (Kin) 

1900 34.129,290 627,712 2,402,785 29,726,987 21,504,777 

1901 36,656,434 464,317 2,922,215 29,879,849 14,921,197 

1902 34,423,01 5 1 ,932,723 2,969,885 35,454,556 4,489,392 



Exhibits, 



GROUP »5. 

Working of Mines, Ore Beds and 
Stone Quarries* 

1. Murakami, Sanso, Aikawa, 

Sado — 
Special water proof fuse. 
Water fuse. 
Ordinary fuse. 

2. Niigata Iron Works, Xiigata, 

Vcchigo — 
Wing; rope socket. 
Sinker bar. 
Steel lined jar. 
Spuddling bit. 
Drilling bit. 
Austrial under reamer. 
Drive pipe spear. 



Steel wire drilling rope. 
Socket. 

Fishing socket. 
Fishing shoe. 
Fishing slip shoe. 
Honi socket. 
Rope Spear. 
Temper screw. 

3. Yoshida Sansuke, Shimane- 
ken — 
Safety fuse for use in dry 

ground. 
Safety fuse for use in wet 

ground. 
Safety fuse for iise in water. 
Safety fuse for use in strong 

water. 
Safety fuse for submarine use. 



252 



jAPANEsr: Exhibition, 



GROUP 116. 

Minerals and Stones and Their 
Utaization« 

1. Amenomiya Wataru, Iivate- 

ken — 

Pig, Sennin iron. 

Iron ore, Sennin iron mine. 

2. Chikusen and Buscn Colliery 

Owners Association, Fuku- 
oka-ken — 

Coal, 4 ft. seam (Aida province, 
Chikuzen). 

Coal 5 ft. seam (Aida province, 
Chikuzen). 

Washed coal smalls (Aida prov- 
ince, Chikuzen). 

Coal, 8 ft. seam (Mameda prov- 
ince). 

Coal, 5 ft. seam (Kunosugotoku). 

Coal, 3 ft. seam (Kunosugotoku). 

Coal, 4 ft. seam (Hoshiu prov- 
ince, Buzen). 

Coal, 8 ft seam (Oto province, 
Buzen). 

Coal, 8 ft. seam (Nakatsubara 
province, Buzen). 

Coal, 8 ft. seam (Dainimineji 
province, Buzen). 

Coal, 5 ft. seam (Dainiarase, 
province, Chikuzen). 

Coal, 3 ft seam (Dainiarase, 
province Chikuzen). 

Coal, Yoheda seam (Iwasaki 
province, Chikuzen). 

Coal, Takaye seam (Takye 
province, Chikuzen). 

Coal, Yoheda 5 ft. seam (Koya- 
nose province, Chikuzen). 

Coal, 8 ft. seam (Kanada Prov- 
ince, Buzen). 



Coal, 8 ft. seam (Hokoku Prov- 
ince, Buzen). 

Coal, 4 ft. seam (Hokoku Prov- 
ince, Buzen). 

Coal, 4 ft. seam (Ootsuji Prov- 
ince, Chikuzen). 

Coal, 5 ft. seam (Oonoura Prov- 
ince, Chikuzen). 

Coal, 3 ft. seam (Oonoura Prov- 
ince, Chikuzen). 

Coal, 4 ft. seam (Katsuno Prov- 
ince, Qiikuzen). 

Coal, 5 ft. seam (Katsuno Prov- 
ince, Chikuzen). 

Coal, Kaigun 8 ft. seam (Shino- 
yamada Province, Chikuzen ) . 

Coal Chirimen 5 ft. seam (Shino- 
yamada Province, Chikuzen). 

Coal, Muyen seam (Chikuzen). 

Coal, 5 ft. seam (Akaike Prov- 
ince, Buzen). 

Coal, 5 ft. seam ( Fumidana Prov- 
ince, Chikuzen). 

Coal, 3 ft seam (Fumidana Prov- 
ince, Chikuzen). 

Coal, 5 ft. seam (Hondo Prov- 
ince, Chikuzen). 

Coal, 3 ft. seam (Hondo Prov- 
ince, Chikuzen). 

Coal 5 ft. seam (Tadakuma Prov- 
ince, Chikuzen). 

3. Fujita & Co., Osaka — 
Barytic Complex sulphide ore 

(Kosaka mine). 
Pyritic ore (Kosaka mine). 
Siliceous ore (Kosaka mine). 
Gold ore (Zuiho gold mine). 

4. Furukaiva Jimkichi, Kojima- 

chi-ku, Tokio — 
Chalcopyrite, Daikoku vein, Ash- 
io copper mine. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



253 



Chalcopyrite, Nakahi vein, Ash- 
io copper mine. 

Chalcopyrite, Isudo-Kosei vein, 
Ashio copper mine. 

Chalcopyrite, Chosei vein, Ashio 
.copp>er mine. 

Chalcopyrite, Yokomabu-San- 
go, Ashio copper mine. 

Chalcopyrite, Hoshi vein, Ashio 
copper mine. 

Bomite, Ashio copper mine. 

Precipitated copper, Ashio cop- 
per mine. 

Chalcopyrite, with zinc blende, 
Ashio copper mine. 

Chalcopyrite, Yokomabu vein, 
Ashio copper mine. 

Chalcopyrite, Yebesu vein, Ash- 
io copper mine. 

Chalcopyrite, Tengu vein, Ashio 
copper mine. 

General view of Shimoyamada 
colHery. 

General view of Shiogashira, 
Katsuno colliery. 

4 ft. coal, Shiogashira, Katsuno 
colliery. 

5 ft. coal, Shiogashira, Katsuno 
colliery. 

4 ft. coal, Shiogashira, Katsuno 

collier}'. 
Natural coke, Katsuno collier>'. 
Kaigun 8 ft. coal, Shimoyamada 

collierv. 

Komori 5 ft. coal, Shimoyamada 
colliery. 

Anthracite coal, Shimovamada 
collierv. 

No. I coke, Furukawa Coke Man- 
ufactory. 

m 

No. 2 coke, Furukawa Coke Man- 
ufactory. 



Washed 34 ii^ch size coal, Furu- 
kawra Coke Manufactory. 

Washed y% inch coal, Furukawa 
Coal Manufactory. 

Chalcopyrite with zinc blende, 
Shinsei vein, Ashio copper 

mine. 

* 

Chalcopyrite with zinc blende, 

Kosei Mayehi vein, Ashio cop- 
per mine. 
Chalcopyrite with zinc blende, 

Asbikura vein, Ashio copper 

mine. 
Chalcopyrite with zinc blende, 

Rensei .vein, Ashio copper 

mine. 
Chalcopyrite with zinc blende, 

Nakamine vein, Ashio copper 

mine. 
Chalcopyrite with zinc blende, 

Yeisei vein, Ashio copper mine. 
Galena, Kosawa Meisei vein, Ani 

copper mine. 

Galena, Daira vein, Ani copper 
mine. 

Chalcopyrite with galena, Daira 
vein, Ani copper mine. 

Zinc blende, with galena, Kaya- 
kusa vein, Ani copper mine. 

Chalcopyrite, Sanmai Shinkiri 
vein, Ani copper mine. 

Chalcopyrite, Sanmai Iridade 
vein, Ani copper mine. 

Malachite, Kosawa vein, Ani cop- 
per mine. 

Chalcopyrite, Sanmai Odate vein, 
Ani copper mine. 

Chalcopyrite, Kosawa Meisei 
vein, Ani copper mine. 

Chalcopyrite, Sanmai Xeuma 
vein, Ani copper mine. 



254 



Japanese Exhibition. 



Chalcopyrite, with galena, Ani 
copper mine. 

Chalcopyrite, Ani copper mine. 

Malachite, Ani copper mine. 

Chalcopyrite, with quartz. Kusa- 
kura copper mine. 

Chalcopyrite, in tuyf, Kusakiira 
copper mine. 

Chalcopyrite, Kusakura copper 
mine. 

Native copper, Kusakura mine. 

Malachite, Kusakura copper 
mine. 

Native copper, Kusakura copper 
mine. 

Chalcopyrite, Kusakura copper 
mine. 

Galena, Kusakura copper mine. 

Ilovaite, Kusakura copper mine. 

Hematite, Kusakura copper mine. 

Ironpyrite, Kusakura copper 
mine. 

Chalcopyrite, Furokura copper 
mine. 

Argenite, galena, se., Innai silver 
mine. 

Lower grade silver ore, Innai sil- 
ver mine. 

Argent ite with quartz, Innai sil- 
ver mine. 
• Copperpyrite in ironpyrite. Kune 
copper mine. 

Chalcopyrite, Ani copper mine. 

Malachite, Sanmai, Odate, Ani 
copper mine. 

Chalcopyrite, Ashio copper mine. 

Chalcopyrite, Sanmai, Ani cap- 
per mine. 

Dry shifted small ore, Ashio cop- 
per mine. 

Dry shifted fine ore. Ashio cop- 
per mine. 



Dressed nut-$ize ore from jigger. 

Ashio copper mine. 
Aptite, Ashio copper mine. 
Biotite granite, Ashio copper 

mine. 
Limestone, Ashio copper mine. 
Codierite, Ashio copper mine. 
Pyroxen andesite, Ashio copper 

mine. 
Clay slate, Ashio copper mine. 
Liparite, Ashio copper mine. 
Gangue calceite, Ashio copper 

mine. 
Quartz, Ashio copper mine. 
Porphyritic granite, Sanwai, Ani 

copper mine. 
Porphyritic granite, Kosawa, Ani 

copper mine. 
Prppyrite granite, Sanmai, Ani 

copper mine, 
(iangue quartz, Sanmai Shinkiri. 

Tuff breccia with fossil Schell, 
Sanmai Shinkiri Ohate, Ani 
silver mine. 

Pirecciated tuff. Kayakusa silver 
mine. 

Rhyolite, Kusakura copper mine. 

Tuff, Kusakura copper mine. 

Brecciated tuff, Kusakura copper 
mine. 

Breccia, Kusakura copper mine. 

Brecciated tuff, Kusakura copper 
mine. 

Gangue quartz, Kusakura copper 
mine. 

Country rock, tuff, Furokura 
copper mine. 

Gangue, Dog-toothspar, Furoku- 
ra copper mine. 

Gangue quartz, Innai silver mine. 



International Exposition', St. Louis, 1904. 



255 



P 



Gangue saccharoidal lime-stone, 

Innai silver mine. 
Siliconous tuff, Innai silver mine. 

5. Hokkaido Colliery & Railway 

Co,, Hokkaido {head office, 
Kyobashi-ku, Tokyo) — 

Cokes, Oiwake Coking Plant. 

Coal, Yubari colliery. 

Coal, Sorachi colliery. 

Coal, Poronal collier)'. 

Coal, Ikushunbetsu colliery. 

6. Horinonchi Shoyemon, Kago, 

Shimaken — 
Gold ores, Okuchi mines. 
Country rocks, Okuchi mines. 
Photographs, Okuchi mines. 
Gold ore, Okuchi gold mine. 

7. Imperial Bureau of Mines, 

Tokyo — 

Typical minerals recognized in 
Japanese mining law. 

Collection of copper of principal 
mines in Japan. 

Collection of manganese ores of 
principal mines in Japan. 

Collection of typical coals in Ja- 
pan. 

8: Imperial Geological Survey, 
Tokio — 
Collection of rocks. 
Collection of fossils. 
Collection of ores. 
Typical samples of Japanese 

soils. 
Collection of whetstone. 
Collection of kaolin. 



9. Imperial Steel Works, 
kuokaken. 
Magnetite. 
Micaceous hematite. 



Fw- 



Limonite. 
Limestone. 
Dolomite. 
Cokes. 

ID. Japan Oil Co., Kashi^vacaki, 
Xiigataken — 
Engine oil. (Amaze, Yechigo.) 
Dynamo oil. ( Amaze, Yechigo.) 
Cylinder oil. (Amaze, Yechigo.) 
Valve oil. (Amaze, Yechigo.) 
Belt oil. (Amaze, Yechigo.) 
Spindle oil. (Amaze. Yechigo.) 
Crude oil. (Amaze, Yechigo). 
Crude oil. ( Nagamine, Yech- 
igo-) 
Crude oil. (Urase, Yechigo.) 

Crude oil. (Maki, Yechigo.) 
Crude oil. (Nitsu, Yechigo). 
Crude oil. (Akita, Ugo). 
Crude oil. (Ishikari.) 
Crude oil. (Totomi.) 
Light oil. (Amaze, Yechigo.) 
Lamp 6il. (Amaze. Yechigo.) 
230 oil. ( Auiaze, Yechigo.) 
Heavy oil. (Amaze, Yechigo.) 
Vaseline oil. (Amaze, Yechigo.) 
Lubricating oil. (Amaze, Yech- 
igo.) 
Machine oil. (Amaze, Yechigo.) 

11. Konishi Ihci, Osaka — 
Manganese ore. Iwasaki manga- 
nese mine. 

12. Kivansai Coke Co., Osaka — 
Cokes. 

13. Mitsubishi & Co., Tokio — 
Coal, Shinniu colliery. 

Coal, Numatzuta colliery. 
Brecciated Liparite, Arakawa 

copper mine. 
Propyrite, Arakawa copper mine. 



256 



Japanese: Exhibition, 



Amethyst, Arakawa copper mine. 
Quartz after barytes, Arakawa 

copper mine. 
Linarite and pyromorphite, Hi- 

saichi copper mine. 
Native copper, Arakawa mine. 
Copperpyrite, with rock crystal, 

Arakawa copper mine. 
Copperpyrite, Arakawa copper 

mine. 
Diorite, with quartz veins, Ikuno 

silver mine. 
Propyrite, with quartz veins, 

Ikuno silver mine. 
Propyrite, with auriferous cop- 
per mine veins, Ikuno copper 

mine. 
Scheelite in copper veins, Ikuno 

copper mine. 
Auriferous argentite. Ikuno cop- 
per mine. 
Argentite, Ikuno copper mine. 
Argentiferous copperpyrite and 

bornite, Ikuno copper mine. 
Clay slate, Makimine copper 

mine. 
Slate, with thin layers of pyritic 

copper ore, Makimine copper 

mine. 
Calcite on copper ore and slates, 

Makimine copper mine. 
Native copper, Makimine copper 

mine. 
Pyritic copper ore, Makimine 

copper mine. 

Brecciated andestite tuff, Osaru- 
sawa copper mine. 

Tuff shale, Osarusawa copper 
mine. 

Quartz, Osarusawa copper mine. 

Barytes, Osarusawa copper mine. 



Native copper, Osarusawa cop- 
per mine. 

Copperpyrites, Osarusawa cop- 
per mine, 

Copperpyrites and bornite, Osa- 
rusawa copper mine. 

Propyritic abdesite, Sado gold 
mine. 

Argentiferous quartz vein, Sado 
gold mine. 

Calcite on marl, Sado gold mine. 

Auriferous argentite, Sado gold 
mine. 

Argentine with native gold, Sado 
gold mine. 

Auriferous argentite, Sado gold 
mine. 

Coal, Ochi colliery. 

Coal, Takashima colliery. 

Coal, Hashima colliery. 

Coal, Takashima colliery. 

14. Mitsui Mining Co., Tokio — 
Coke, Miike Colliery. 

Sump coal (4 feet seam) of Tag- 
awa Colliery. 

Sump coal (8 feet seam) of Tag- 
awa Colliery. 

Sump coal of Yajnano Colliery. 

Sump coal of Miike Colliery. 

Nuts and powder of Miike Col- 
liery. 

Ag. Cu. and Pb. ore of Kamioka 
mine. 

Lievrite, calcite, azurite, cuprif- 
erous calamine, pyromorphite. 

15. Xakano Sliiro, Hokkaido — 
Gold sand, Shiribeshi province. 
Gold sand, I shikari province. 
Gold nugget, Ishikari province. 
Gold sand, Teshio province. 
Gold sand, Kitami province. 



i 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



257 



r 



Gold nugget, Kitami province. 
Gold sand, Hitaka province. 
Gold sand, Takachi province. 
Gold sand, Iburi province. 

16. Namikawa Yasuke, Kioto — 
Whetstones of different size. 

17. Osaka Chemical Industry Co,, 

Osaka — 
Cokes. 
Coal tar. 
Ammonium sulphate. 

18. Osaka Whetstone Co., Ki- 

takintaro'tnachi, Osaka — 

Whetstone. 



Whetstone 
Whetstone 
Whetstone 
Whetstone 
Whetstone 
Whetstone 
Whetstone 
Whetstone 
Whetstone 
Whetstone 
Whetstone 
Whetstone 
Whetstone 
Whetstone 
Whetstone 
Whetstone 
Whetstone 
Whetstone 
Whetstone 



Awase hachikiri. 

Otsuki awaseto. 

Tajima. 

lyo. 

Kijito. 

Nag^ratoishi. 

Jiokenji. 

Aoto. 

Saikito. 

Tsushimato. 

Amakusa. 

Kimura. 

Arato sasakuchi. 

Arato Hirashima. 

Arato Daikuchi. 

Arato Aome. 

Sasakuchimaruto. 

Hirashimamaruto. 

Aomemaruto. 



ly. Sunohara Kumajiro, Vehime- 
ken — 

iridosmin stibnite, Kano anti- 
mony mine. 

Country rock (clay slate), Kano 
Antimony mine. 



Vein stuff, Kano Antimony mine. 
Liporite, Kano Antimony mine. 
Stibnite (crystals), Kano Anti- 
mony mine. 

20. Tokunaga Shigeyaru, Tokio — 
Gold ore, Shikaori. 

2r. Ushio Gold Mining Co., Ka- 
goshima-ken — 
Gold ores, Ushio gold mines. 

22. Vasukawa Keiichiro, Fuku- 
oka-ken — 

Meiji Kankan coal, Meiji Col- 
liery. 

Meiji (3 feet coal), Meiji Col- 
liery. 

Meiji (5 feet coal), Meiji Col- 
liery. 

Akaike (5 feet coal), Akaike Col- 
liery. 

GROUP U7. 
Mine Models, Map, Photographs* 

1. Amenomiya Wataru, Iwate- 

ken — 
Geological map of Sennin iron 
mine. 

2. Chikusen and Buzen CoUierv 

Owners' Association, Fnku- 

oka-ken — 
Map of coal fields. 
Photographs. 
Sections of coal seams. 
Photographs of Kosaka mine. 
Album of Kosaka mine. 

3. I'ormosan Government, Tai- 

hoku — 
^fap showing geological and 
mineral products. (Installed 
in Japan section, Palace of 
Agriculture.) 



258 



T-XPANKSK Exhibition, 



4. Furukawa Junkichi, Tokio — 
Photographs. 

General view of reduction work. 
Innai silver work. 
Amalgamation plant in the reduc- 
tion work, Innai silver mine. 
Concentrator, Innai silver mine. 
Tailing from settler, Innai silver 

mine. 
Model, silver bullion, Innai silver 

mine. 
Model, system of vein, Ashio 

copper mine. 
Model, ore dressing plant, Tsuto, 

Ashio copper mine. 
Photographs : 
General view of Furukawa coke 

factory. 
Coke ovens in Furukawa coke 

factory. 
Coal washing plant in Furukawa 

coke factory. 
Tuff breccia, Daira, Ani copper 

mine. 
General view of ore dressing 

works, Furokura copper mine. 
General view of ore dressing 

works, Kusakura copper mine. 
Slime concentrater in Honzan, 

Ashio copper mine. 
Interior view of Kotaki concen- 
trator works, Ashio copper 

mine. 
Makomato settling and filtering 

ponds, Ashio copper mine. 

Nakasai settling and filtering 
ponds, Ashio copper ponds. 

Kotaki settling and filtering 
ponds, Ashio copper mine. 

General view of ore dressing 
works, Innai silver mine. 



Interior view of ore dressing 
works, Innai silver mine. 

Above photographs in all. 

Dressed pea-size ore from jigger, 
Ashio copper mine. 

Dressed ore from jigger, Ashio 
copper mine. 

Concentrates from Wilfrey ta- 
ble, Ashio copper mine. 

Waste from jigging small ore, 
Ashio copper mine. 

Waste from jigging fine ore, 
Ashio copper mine. 

Waste from Wilfrey table slime, 
Ashio copi>er mine. 

Dressed ore from jigger, Furo- 
kura copper mine. 

High grade selected ore, Innai 
silver mine. 

Low grade selected ore, Innai 
copper mine. 

Dressed ore from jigger, Furo- 
kura copper mine. 

General view of Honzan Ashio 
copper mine. 

General view of Kotaki Ashio 
copper mine. 

General view of Tsudo Ashio 
copper mine. 

General view of Kusakura cop- 
per mine. 

General view of Ani copper 
mine. 

General view of Kune copper 
mine. 

Rock drill in execution. 

Ashio copper mine headgear for 
Yamaichi shaft Innai silver 
mine. 

Interior view of Mato hydro- 
electric power station, Ashio 
copper mine. 



1 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



259 



Interior view of Kakemidzu hy- 
dro-electric power station, 
Ashio copper mine. 

General view of Kabayama hy- 
dro-electric power station, In- 
nai silver mine. 

Interior view of Kabayama hy- 
dro-electric power station, In- 
nai silver mine. 

Tarbin and regulator in Kaba- 
yama hydro-electric power sta- 
tion, Innai silver mine. 

Photographs of entrance of Tsuto 
level, Ashio copper mine. 

Aerial tramway, Ashio copper 
mine. 

The electric tramway, Ashio cop- 
per mine. 

General view of aerial tramwav. 
station, Furokura copper mine. 

5. Hokkaido Colliery and Rail- 

way Co., Kyobashiku, To- 
kyo- 
Geological maps of Fubari Col- 
liery. 
Geological maps of Sorachi Col- 

lierv. 
Geological maps of Poronai and 

Ikushumbeten colliery. 
Map of Japan and Hokkaido. 

6. Horinouchi, Shoyemon, Kago- 

Shimaken — 

Photograph of Okuchi gold 
mine. 

7. Imperial Geological Survey, 

Tokio — 
Comprehensive map of the oil 

producing locations in Japan. 
Model of Bandai volcano before 

and after its eruption. 



Orographical and bathymetrical 

maps of Japan. 
General geological maps of Ja- 
pan. 
. General topographical map of 

Japan. 
Topographical and geological 

map in detail. 
Geological and topographical 

map of the oil fields, sections 

I and 2. 
Geological and topographical re- 

connoissance maps of Japan. 
Agronomic reconnoissance maps 

of Japan with tables. 
Agronomic maps of Tokio-fu, 
. * Kanagawa-ken, Hyo g o-k e n, 

Nagasaki-ken, Osaka-fu and 

Oitaken. 
Geological and topographical map 

of the oil fields, section 3. 

8. Japan Oil Co., Niigata-ken — 
Photographs. 

9. Mitsubishi & Co,, Tokio — 
Relief of Takashima coal mine. 
Section of coal formation. 

10. Mitsui Mining Co., Tokio — 
Model of manda Rit of Miike 

Colliery. 

11. Mitsui Mining Co., Tokio — 
Photographs of the Miike col- 
liery. 

Photographs of the Tagawa col- 
liery. 

Photographs of the Yamano col- 
liery. 

Photographs of the Kamioka 
mine. 

Photographs of the Tsurugizan 
mine. 



26o 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Photographs of Iwanobori mine. 

Special photographs of Miike col- 
Hery. 

Geographical maps of Miike col- 
liery. 

Geographical maps of Tagawa 
collier\\ 

Geographical maps of the Yama- 
no colliery. 

12. Murakami Sauso, Niigata-ken. 
Photographs. 

13. Nakano Shiro, Hokkaido — 
Map. 

14. Niigata Iron IVorks, Niigata — 
Photographs. 

15. Yasukazi'a Kciichiro, Ftikuo- 

ka-ken — 

Topographical and geological 
map of Meiji and Akaike col- 
lieries. 

GROUP US. 

Metallur^. 

1. fujita & Co., Osaka — 

Model of Kosaka smelting and 
refining works. 

Copper ingot, Kosaka mine. 

Cathode ingot, Kosaka mine. 

Gold and silver bullion, Kosaka 
mine. 

2. FurukaiK'a, Junkichi, Tokio — 
Liparite used as liming of con- 
verter. 

(leneral view of smelting works, 
Ashio copper mine. 

Interior view of smelting works, 
Ashio copper mine. 

Interior view of bessemerizing 
works, Ashio copper mine. 



Selecteur showing the manner of 

working, Ashio copper mine. 
Air compressor for bessemerizing 

by steam engine, Ashio copper 

mine. 
Air compressor for bessemerizing 

by hydraulic engine, Ashio 

copper mine. 
Interior view of . desulphurizing 

tower, Ashio copper mine. 
General view of smelting works, 

Furokura copper mine. 
Interior view of smelting works, 

Ani copper mine. 
General view of smelting works, 

Kusakura copper mine. 
Roasted small ore, Ashio copper 

mine. 
Photographs. 
Roasted fine ore, Ashio copper 

mine. 
Matte from pyritic smelting, 

Ashio copper mine. 
Matte inclosing fine ores, Ashio 

copper mine. 
Slag from pyritic smelting, Ashio 

copper mine. 
Slag from roasted ore smelting, 

Ashio copper mine. 
Ashio Bessemer copper as mate- 
rial for electrolytic-refining, 

Furokura copper mine. 
Ani blister copper as material for 

electrolytic refining, Furokura 

copper mine. 
Photographs : 

General view of Furukawa cop- 
per works. 

Wire mille in Furukawa cc^per 
works. 

Reverberatory furnaces in Furu- 
kawa copper works. 



1 



International Exposition^ St. Louis, 1904. 



261 



^ 



Electrotypic vats in Furukawa 

copper works. 
B. W. G. 40. Electrolytic wire, 

Furukawa copper works. 
B. W. G. i-o, Furukawa cc^per 

works. 
B. W. G. I, Furukawa copper 

works. 
B. W. G. 2, Furukawa copper 

works. 
B. W. G. 3. Furukawa copper 

works. 
B. W. G. 4. Furukawa copper 

works. 
B. W. G. 5. Furukawa copper 

works. 
B. W. G. 6. Furukawa copper 

works. 
B. W. G. 7. Furukawa copper 

works. 
B. W. G. 8. Furukawa copper 

works. 
B. W. G. 9. Furukawa copper 

works. 
B. W. G. 10. Furukawa copper 

works. 
B. W. G. II. Furukawa copper 

works. 
B. W. G. 12. Furukawa copper 

Works. 
B. W. G. 13. Furukawa copper 

works. 
B. W. G. 14. Electrolytic wire, 

Furukawa copper works. 
B. W. G. 15. Furukawa copper 

works. 
B. W. G. 16. Furukawa copper 

works. 
B. W. G. 17. Furukawa copper 

works. 
B. W. G. r8. Furukawa copper 

works. 



B. W. G. 19. Furukawa copper 

works. 
H. W. G. 20. Furukawa copper 

works. 
1>. W. G. 21. Furukawa copper 

works. 
B. W. G. 22. Furukawa copper 

works. 
H. VV. G. 23. Furukawa coopper 

works. 
B. W. G. 24. Furukawa copper 

works. 
Trolley wire, Furukawa copper 

works. 
B. W. G. No. 17. Silicon bronze 

wire, Furukawa copper works. 
Ingot (Marugata) Furukawa 

copper works. 
Ingot (Kakugata) Furukawa 

copper works. 
.Anode, Furukawa copper works. 
Cathode, Furukawa copper 

works. 
Electrolytic bar, Furukawa cop- 
per works. 
Tile, large and small, Furukawa 

copper works. 
Blue vitriol, Furukawa copper 

works. 
Copper band. Furukawa copper 

works. 

3. Hitachi, Hikoycmon. Osaka, 
Iii'atsuho Gohei, Kioto — 
Gold leaf, class i. 
(lold leaf, class 2. 
(lold leaf, class 3. 
Gold leaf, class 4. 
Gold leaf, class 5. 
Gold leaf, class 6. 
(lold leaf, class 7. 
Gold leaf, class 8. 
Gold leaf, class g. 



262 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Gold leaf, class lo 
Gold leaf, class ii. 
Gold leaf, class 12. 
Silver leaf, class i. 
Silver leaf, class 2. 
Silver leaf, class 3. 
Auriferous silver leaf. 
False gold leaf, class i. 
False gold leaf, class 2. 
False gold leaf, class 3. 
Ammonium leaf. 
False gold leaf, class 4. 
Tin leaf. 
Iriboku, class i. 
Iriboku, class 2. ' 
Iriboku, class 3. 
Iriboku, class 4. 
Copper powder, class i 
Copper powder, class 2 
Copper powder, class 3 
Copper powder, class 4 
Copper powder, class 5 
Copper powder, class 6 
Copper powder, class 7 
Copper powder, class 8 
Copper powder, class 9 
Copper powder, class 10. 
Copper powder, class 11. 
Copper powder, class 12. 
Copper powder, class 13. 
Gold thread, A No. 8. 
Gold thread, A No. 13. 
Gold thread, A No. 15. 
Gold thread, B No. 6. 
Gold thread, B No. 16. 
Gold thread, C No. 8. 
Gold thread, C No. 13. 
Gold thread, D No. 8. 
Gold thread, D No. 12. 
Gold thread, 13. 
Gold thread, 14. 
Gold thread, 16. 



Gold thread, E No. 8. 
Gold thread, E No. 10. 
Gold thread, 12. 
Gold thread, 13. 
Gold cloth, No. I. 
Gold cloth. No. 2. 
Gold cloth. No. 3. 
Gold cloth. No. 4. 
Gold cloth. No. 5. 
Gold cloth. No. 6. 
Covering of walls. 

4. Imperial Steel Works, Fukiio- 

ka-kcn — 

Flat bars. 

Round bars. 

Square bars. 

T bars. 

Triangular bars. 

Light bars. 

Sixty-pound rail. 

I bars. 

U bars 

Steel plate. 

Samples taken at different 
stages in the process for man- 
facturing light rails, etc. 

\'arious test pieces. 

5. Mitsubishi & Co., Tokio— 

Copper ingot, Arakawa copper 
mine. 

Copper, Makimine copper mine. 

Copper, Auriferous, Osarusawa 
mine. 

Copper cathodes, Isaka Electro- 
Refining Co. 

Copper «labs, Osaka Electro- 
Refining Co. 

Anodes, Osaka Electro-Refining 
Co. 

Blue vitriol, Osaka Electro-Re- 
fining Co. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



263 



i 



Electro-deposited gold, Osaka 
Electro-Refining Co. 

Electro-deposited silver, Osaka 
Electro-Refining Co. 

Copper ingot, Hisaichi copper 
mine. 

Auriferous and argentiferous in- 
got, Ikuno silver mine. 

6. Mitsui Mining Co., Tokio — 
Copper ingot of Kamioka mine. 
Copper ingot of Mozumi mine. 
Lead pig of Kamioka mine. 
Lead pig of Mozumi mine. 
Silver ingot of Kamioka mine. 
Bismuth of Kamioka mine. 
Bismuniferous litharge and sil- 
ver of Kamioka mine. 

7. Sunohara Kumajiro, Yehime- 

ken — 
Antimonium crudum, Saijo 

smelting works. 
Refined antimony, Saijo smelting 

works. 

8. Niigata Iron Works, Niigata- 

ken — 
Model of oil furnace in the 
Smithv. 



GROUP U9. 

Lfterature of Mining:, Metal- 
lutgYf Etc 

1. Chikuzen and Buzen Colliery 

Owners' Association, Osa- 
ka — 
Statistics. 

2. Fujita & Co., Osaka — 
Diagram of Kosaka mine. 

3. Hokkaido Colliery and Rail- 

way Company, Hokkaido — 
Statistical table. 

4. Imperial Bureau of Mines, To- 

kio — 

Maps, diagrams, tables, etc., il- 
lustrating mineral industry of 
principal minerals. 

Notes on the mineral industry of 
Japan. 

5. Mining Institute of Japan, 

Tokyo — 
Journal of Mining Institute of 
Japan, 12 vols. 

6. Nakano Shiro, Hokkaido — 
Statistics. 



t 



264 Jai^^^'ese Exhibition, 



CHAPTER XII. 

Department of Fish and Game. 

Introductory Remarks. 

/. Fish, "^ 

As regards our exhibits pertaining to fishery and the fishery in- 
dustry, the Japanese Commission to the World's Fair, with the consent 
of the Department of Agriculture and Industry, decided to accept only 
those articles belonging to either one of the following items : 

1. Net-fishing gear and angling gear. 

2. Salt-preserved fish, smoked fish, canned fish, and bottled fish. 

3. Fish oil, cod oil, and the like. 

4. Kanten and Funori, 

5. Pearls, corals, shells, and their manufactures. 

Besides restricting the kinds of articles to be exhibited, the Com- 
mission nominated the exhibitors from among those who are considered 
able to make the best exhibition. There are also articles exhibited by 
local governments and municipalities, beside those by private indi- 
viduals. 

The marine fauna and flora in the Japanese waters are much varied 
and very plentiful in kinds. The most useful kinds in the northern 
part of the Empire are herring, cod, kombu (Laminaria), funori {Gloio- 
peltis), etc. In the southern waters are found sardine, anchovy, mack- 
erel, bonito, tunny, yellow-tail, tai (Pagrus), flat-fish, shark, ayu (Pie- 
coglossus), squid and calamary, clams, oysters, prawns, shrimps, sea- 
cucumber, precious corals, tengusa (Gelidium), amanori {Porphyra)^ j 
etc. The fauna and flora of the Japan Sea differ greatly from those 
of the Pacific. 

The fresh water fishery is not so important as the pelagic fishery, ^ 

as there are only a few large lakes and rivers. In the warm seasons 
nearly the whole coast of the Empire is washed by the Kuroshiwo (black 
current) and its branches. Thus, the important migratory fish of the 
southern waters are caught in the northern part of Honshu (Main 
Island) and in the shores of Hokkaido, late in the summer and in the 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 265 

fall. In winter and spring, the Kuriles, Hokkaido, the northeastern 
and northwestern coasts of Honshu are washed by the Oyashiwo (cold 
current) and its branches. 

The temperature and specific gravity of water at the beginning of 
each season ^on five different coasts are as follows: 

Specific Gravity Temperature 

' Feb. May. Aug. Nov. Feb. May. Aug. Nov. 

Same 1.0259 1.0253 1.0260 2.0249 7-5°C as^'C I7.7**C I4.7**C 

Ogi 1.0259 1.0254 1.0225 1.0239 io.6^C i3.S*'C 23.5''C i9.i°C 

Ofunakoshi 1.0262 1.0256 1.0224 1.0236 I4.4**C 1 6.1 ""C 23.6'' C 22.9° C 

Shiwonomisaki .1.0258 1.0232 1.0220 1.0237 i5.i*C i8.o°C 25.o°C 2i.7°C 

Hoshoshima 1.0260 1.0255 1.0200 1.0239 i7.o°C i8.5*C 22.7°C 2i.7''C 

Fishermen. — The number of professional fishermen amounts to 
939*893, while some 1,402,833 are engaged in farming or some other 
business along with fishery. The number of fishing vessels amounts 
i to over four hundred thousand. These figures are very large, but in 

I view of the fact that our Empire consists of many islands, having a 

total coast line of more than thirty thousand kilometers, thev are not 
wonderful. 

Fishing Gears. — As our coasts were richly supplied with fish, it 
was not necessary to go far for fishing. Hence, our fishing implements 
and boats have been confined to those which could be safely used only 
near the coast. But, as the result of overfishing, the important kinds of 
fish have been decreasing, while at the same time the number of fisher- 
men and the demand for fish have been increasing, so that it has lately 
become necessary to seek fishing grounds in the waters comparatively 
distant from the shores. 

Accordingly, several kinds of drift-nets and purse-seines have come 
into general use for the purpose of ofi^-shorc fishing. Consequently, 
the materials for making fishing gear now include cotton, yarn, flax, 
Manila hemp, etc., whereas in former days we used only hemp, silk, 
and rice straw. Meanwhile, the fishermen have begun to pay much 
attention to the preservation of gears, resulting in the introduction of 
many kinds of preservatives. 

Fishing Boats. — Generally speaking, our fishing boats are small, 
and are especially constructed to enable them to be hauled up on the 



266 Japanesk Exhibition, 

shore. Their forms and construction are entirely different from those 
common in Western countries. Their lengths are varied between 
twenty to fifty feet, and their width between five to eleven feet. The 
cost of making one boat is from fifty to six hundred yen. Though 
suited for coast fishing, they are obviously unfitted for pelagic fishing. 
Thus, the improvement of fishing boats has of late years become a mat- 
ter of importance. 

The following table shows the number of fishing boats of different 
sizes for three consecutive years : 

No. of boats No. of boats No. of boats Total 

over 30 ft. in under 30 ft. under 18 ft. No. of 

Vear. length. in length. in length. boats. 

1899 17,047 17,682 17,395 418,752 

1900 69,036 71,482 85,174 422,523 

J90I 322,670 333,359 333,57© 436,139 

In 1891, the number of fishing boats with length of 30 feet or 
more was 7,960; under 30 feet, 44,188, and under 18 feet, 329,325. 
When we compare these figures with those for 190 1, we see that the 
increase of the boats over 30 feet in length is much greater than of 
those under 18 feet. So, we may say that there is a tendency to in- 
crease the size of boats. 

Since the Government made a law for the promotion of off-shore 
fishing, in 1897, schooners and steamers have come into use for whaling, 
sealing, long-line fishing, etc. The number of these vessels amounts to 
thirty-two, with a tonnage of 2,122. 

Utilication of Fishery Products. — Fish are sold fresh in enormous 
quantities in Japan and fresh-fish markets are extended year by year, 
as the conveniences of transportation increases. We also preserve a 
large quantity of fish, and utilize many kinds of fishery products to a 
degree not excelled by any other country. Amongst these, the utiliza- 
tion of algae is most remarkable. Our most important sea-weeds are 
kombu (Laminaria), amanori {Porphyra), tengusa (Gelidium) and 
funori {Gloiopeltis). A greater portion of the dried kombu is ex- 
ported to China as a food-stuff'. Tengusa is used to make what is called 
kantcn (which may be seen among the exhibits). The kanten is also 
exported to China and other countries in large quantities. Amanori is 



I 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 267 

made into sheets like paper and dried. The dried amanori is called 
hoshinori and is considered a great delicacy. Funori can also be made 
into sheets the same way as honshindri. It is used for starch only. 

The methods of curing fishery products have greatly improved in 
recent years. This is especially seen in the canning business, which 
was introduced some thirty or forty years ago and has grown rapidly 
since the Japan-China War. A little more than five million pounds of 
fish and shellfish are canned annually. 

Brine-salting or curing fish in strong brine has also been introduced 
lately, the salting of fish having formerly been confined mostly to dry 
salting. This has made it necessary to improve our salt industry in 
order to get a better quality of salt. Many improvements have already 
been made in this direction. 

Fishery Foreign Trade, — As to our export trade, dried cuttle-fish, 
dried sea-ear, dried sea-cucumber, dried shark's fin, dried kombu and 
kanten, are the most important articles going to China. Our export of 
fishery products has been in prosperous condition, the exports always 
exceeding the imports. The total export to China has increased three 
million yen within the last ten years. Fish oils, including herring, 
sardine, shark-liver, cod-liver and whale oil are exported to Europe in 
large quantities. 

Pisciculture. — Pisciculture or acquiculture in Japan includes the 
culture of fish, shellfish, reptiles and even algae. Some of these have 
been cultivated from ancient times. Among these are the gold-fish, 
carp, eel, grey mullet, oyster, pearl-oyster (Avicula), ark-sheels (^rca), 
ageviaki {Siliquaria) , soft-shell turtle or snapping turtle, and amanori 
(an alga of the genus Porphyro). Most of them are cultivated in 
ponds, either of fresh or brackish water, except shellfish and alga, which 
are cultured in bay or creek. We have raised so many va- 
rieties of gold-fish that we have now our own races quite different from 
their originals, which are said to have been introduced from China. 
Oyster culture has also been so improved that it is now successfully 
carried on even in the deep muddy bottom, where it would be quite im- 
possible to raise a single oyster in an ordinary way. The cultivation of 
amanori {Porphyra), which is known only in Japan, is extensively 



268 . Japanese Exhibition, 

carried on in the Tokvo Bav and the Sea of Hiroshima-ken. This 
sea-weed is collected by means of the trees or bamboos with branches, 
driven in the sandy flats which are exposed at the time of the ebb-tide. 
To these the spores of the alga attach themselves and grow. These 
trees or bamboos are renewed every year. Funori (Goloiopeltis) is 
also cultivated in a primitive but effective method in some parts of the 
country. This is done simply by throwing stones in the shallow water 
to give the alga a place to grow on. 

Carp culture is the most popular of the artificial fishing industries. 
It is carried on to a large extent in ponds and sometimes even in rice- 
fields. The culture of the soft-shell turtle is limited to one place in the 
suburb of Tokyo. This is a most trying business and needs great skill. 

The artificial propagation of Salmonidae has also been practiced. 
In the year 1878, the Agricultural Bureau collected the eggs of salmon 
in certain rivers in Niigata-ken, Nagano-ken, Ibaraki-ken and Hok- 
kaido, and distributed 356,500 fry into many rivers and lakes. In the 
years from 1879 to 1890, fry to the number of 480,000; 870,000; 
430,000; 796,000; 510,000; 801,000; 780,000; 660,000; 459,000; 
2,005,000; 1,200,000; 1.130,000, respectively, were put into the rivers 
and lakes, but without much success. Only in Lake Chujenji, in 
Xikko, a good result was obtained. In this lake where there was not a 
single fish eatable before the propagation of salmon, the condition ha? 
so changed that the lake now supplies an abundance of delicious fish 
and affords excellent sport for tourists. 

In 1890, the central Government discontinued hatchery work, with 
the only exception of one hatchery at Niigata-ken. At this hatchery 
American salmon eggs were once hatched and one thousand fry were 
liberated. The hatchery at Hokkaido is doing the most extensive work. 
The model and photographs of this hatchery are among our exhibits 
in this department. The following table shows the number of salmon 
fry liberated during the years 1892- 1902 : 

Hatchery. 1892. 1893. 1894.- 1895. 1896. 1897. 

Hokkaido 3026,415 7>3S5Mo 2.700,729 8,540,178 6,984,178 3.8i 5,558 

Niigata-ken .... 957,825 1,534,968 1,557,832 3,221,321 i,549,43i 979,820 

Akita-ken 404,952 368.592 



^ 



« 



Total 4,484,240 8,890,608 4,258,561 11,761,919 8,938,598 5,164,360 



International Exposition, St. Louis. 1904. 269 

Hatchery. 1898. 1899. 1900. 1901. 1902. 

Hokkaido 7,881,222 10,453486 10,190,365 12,665,214 

Niigata-ken 1,000,000 2,752,145 2,854»i97 4,330,992 2,594,170 

Akita-ken 339,466 168,756 334,394 340,ooo 384,758 

Total 9,220,688 13,374,387 13,378,946 17,336,206 2,978,928 

Scientific Researches. — Preliminary investigations into our fish- 
eries began in 1888, and were finished in 1891. The Fish Commission 
was chosen in 1893, to carry on a more extensive investigation into all 
branches of the fishing industry. This Commission was continued until 
1898. In that year the present Fishery Bureau was organized, which 
carried on more scientific and systematic investigation. Since 1899, 
investigations concerning hydrography and plankton have been made. 
This work has also been executed occasionally in the sea from on board 
a steamer. Beside these there is the Marine Biological Station, which is 
solely devoted to the study of fish. 

Fishery Laws, — As a result of these efiorts to improve the fishing 
industry, it became necessary to restrict the catching of fish within 
certain limits. Hence, the Fishery Law was passed in 1901, and went 
into effect in July, 1902. 

Fishery Experimental Stations, — While these things are carried on 
by the central bureau, the Government has for a number of years en- 
cotiraged the starting of local experimental stations and has given a 
subsidy to each station. As a result, there are now thirty-two experi- 
mental stations distributed among thirty-one prefectures. The annual 
expenditure of these amounts to more than 227,000 yen, of which the 
Government pays 49,800 yen as bounty. 

Educational Institutions. — P'or the purpose of realizing the perma- 
nent improvement of the fishery industry the Government has encour- 
aged the starting of fishery schools in the different parts of the country. 
It also founded a school at Tokyo, in i8c)7, called the Suisan Koshujo, 
or the Fishery Institute. The school was first started by the Fishery 
Society of Japan, in 1889, with subscribed funds. The Government 
helped the school, giving an annual subsidy of six thousand yen from 
1893 to 1897. In 1897 the school became a public institution under the 
direct control of the Government. Thirty-four other fishery schools of 



270 Japanese Exhibition, 

various grades, located in twenty-one different prefectures, have been 
started at the expense of local Governments or counties or towns. 

At some of the fishery experimental stations, lectures are given on 
subjects relating to the fishing industry. 

Private Associations, — There are a few associations organized with 
the aim of uniting those interested in the fishing industry and of study- 
ing all important subjects in connection with fisheries. Among these, 
the Fishery Society of Japan is the oldest organization. It was founded 
in 1881, and now has 4,979 members. It has done a great deal in 
bringing our fisheries into their present state of prosperity and has 
helped the official enterprises in many respects. The society publishes 
a monthly journal. 

There is another association called the Society of Salt Industry of 
Japan, which devotes itself to the improvement of our salt industry. 
It was organized in 1896 and also publishes a monthly journal for 
its 1,500 members. Both of these organizations are located in Tokyo. 

TaBI«K of the VAI.UB OP THE TaKES FROM 1899 TO 1901. 

1899. 1900. I90I. 

Species. Value Yen. Value Yen. Value Yen. 

Herring 7A17A02 7,144,072 7,847,280 

Sardine 6,537,377 7,3io,i20 7,393,415 

Bonito 3,931,974 4,365,887 3,114,608 

Tai (Pagrus) 3,3^6,733 4,109,802 3,258,490 

Mackerel 1,934,091 2,159,018 1,848,173 

Yellow-tail . . / 1,683,773 2,224,297 2,086,329 

Squid 1,355,613 1,562,951 1,787,886 

Tunny 1,327,268 1,814,704 1,808,750 

Cuttle-fish 1,136,495 1,136,710 1,622,731 

Prawns .• 1,095,485 1,345,340 1,385,039 

Salmon 990,534 1,152,678 1,234,81 1 

Kombu (Laminaria) 730,511 602,777 928,164 

Sea-ear 545,366 508,478 529,640 

Ayu (Plecoglossus) 445,398 449,213 570,057 

Shark 421,508 449,442 372,322 

Cod 291,847 372,827 ' 494,999 

Oyster 187,039 190,091 I9S,3I5 

Sea-cucuniber 160,148 174,794 202,092 

Tengusa (Gelidium) 154,563 258,305 250,561 

Clams 119,870 93,305 118,102 

Others 18,271,259 19,408,339 18,404,780 

Total 52,054,254 56,833,150 55,453,544 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



271 



Tabi«b of the Fishery Products from 1899 to 1902. 



i 



9J 
M 

9 

V 

-6 

o 

X 

i. 

O 

U4 



C/5 

u 

H 



c 
o 

o 

fa 






o 



1899 



1900 



SPECIES. 



fa 



Quantity I Value Quantity Value 



Bonito. dried 

Anchovies, boiled 

and dried 

Sardines, dried 

Sardines, salted 

Mackerel, salted.... 

Salmon, salted 

Yellow-tail, salted... 

Tunny, salted 

Tunny, dried 

Cod, salted* 

Hoshinori K d r i e d 

porphyra) 

Cuttle-fish dried 

Kanten (Seaweed 

isinglass) 

Kombu (dried 

Laminaria) 

Prawns, dried 

Sea-ear. dried 

Anchovies, dried 

Cod, dried 

Sea-cucumber.dried 
Shark's Fin, dried- 
Fish Guano- 

Dried Sardines, 

Fish Oil 



Pounds 
11.466.050 

I4-293-392 
21-801.925 

21.058.133 
1 2.965' 283 
•8.061.392 
6. 109. 192 
4.596.150 
2.420.500 
1.195.422 



Others. 

* 



14.107-583 

1.863.433 

58.929.983 
5.484.72s 
1.423.550 
8.602,233 

1.255.417 
1.045.867 

886.175 

396.812.842 

31.027.817 

I 1.337.67s 



Total 



Yen 
3.376.663 

1.449.832 

963.933 
686.728 

566.934 
451.186 
969.816 
276.671 

350.531 
129.512 

510,641 
2.043-540 

866.530 

834.664 
605.517 
500.465 
434.991 
70.200 

265.645 
227.268 

7.358.146 
832.854 
295733 

8.554093 

32.142.098 



Pounds I 
16.497.167 

26.158.758 
20.799.900 

18.334.433 ' 
11.755.675 ' 

9.426.617 ' 

I 
6.510.367 

I 
1.370.792 

1.823.733 ' 
2.710.025 



13.879.108 

2.370.517 

53.750.650 

4.954.500 

1.079.62s 

4.766.608 

1.201.825 

784.508 

831.867 

317*890.208 

33.691.817 
13.994.258 



Yen 

4.881.503 

2.138.777 
941-603 
619.263 
556.357 
523.335 
435.898 
268.809 
79.008 

55.651 

513.947 
2.465.004 

1.153.003 



19OI 



Quantity 



Pounds 



21,440.708 

12.831.742 

19.642.130 

12.668.592 

8.876.208 

6.906.192 

1. 881. 192 

3.069.917 
3.253.708 



18.462.37s 



2.177.867 



602.777 


76.806.97s 


681.356 


5.565.392 


406.549 


1.195.300 


277.08s 


4.484.033 


131.77s 


8.914.936 


206.757 


665.575 


264.171 


768.266 


7.058.117 


243.080.850 


1.400.319 


23.497.250 


399.648 


14.497475 


8.402 679 





\'aluc. 



Yen 



11.526.050 3.642.408 



3.481.191 



1 .608.324 
750.883 
592.785 
586.452 
526.516 
352.479 
415.585 
187.531 
31.965 

803.547 
2.789.474 

1.068.463 

926.164 
701,701 
. 447.731 
238.496 
421.259 
168.728 
140.648 

7.218.45s 
767.832 

412.441 
7.268.657 

32.071.024 



//. Game. 

As the country, consisting of small islands and having a compara- 
tively narrow breadth, does not abound in large mountains and valleys, 
the varieties of game are limited. 



272 Japanese Exhibition^ 

Japan has a thoroughgoing system of protecting game. Some 
kinds of birds are protected with special care, as their existence is of 
great benefit to the farming and forest industries. 

It was in 1873 that a regulation for shooting and hunting was 
promulgated. These rules had undergone repeated amendments till 
they finally took shape in the present Game Law that was promulgated 
in iQoi. 

The fluctuation in the number of licenses granted during the 

recent seven years is shown in the following table: 

License. License. 

Year. Class A. Class B, 

1895 16,376 125,189 

1896 16,991 141,556 

1897 16,609 I74»334 

1898 17,198 178,130 

189Q 16,966 199,808 

1900 16,918 202,862 

1901 11,102 102,265 

1902 15,789 123,519 

Note.— Licenses of class A are issued to those who use firearms, while licenses of class B arc 
issued to those who adopt other methods of killing or capturing game. 

The provisions regarding game preserves were first enacted in 
the present law. These preserves number 58 in all, and have a ten- 
dency to increase. The total number of common game preserves is 
20, of which 13 existed under the old rules and the rest according to 
the new. 

The new law has proved effective in checking the reckless destruc- 
tion of birds due to the enormous number of sportsmen in the country, 
as is shown in the foregoing table, which records the sudden fall of 
the number of shooters by about 50 per cent during the last two years. 
However, no conclusive result can be arrived at on this point until the 
lapse of several years more. 

Several other new provisions were enacted by the new law, such as 
the absolute prohibition both of shooting and hunting in the breeding 
season, the establishment of game preserves and other such restrictive 
measures. In the future, tlierefore, the breeding of birds will be more 
satisfactory than it was during recent years. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



273 



Exhibits, 



GROUP iTO. 

Hunting Equipment. 

I. Imperial Forestry Bureau, De- 
partment of Agriculture and 
Commerce, Tokyo — 

Plan of imperial wild duck pre- 
serve at Shinhama. 

I 

Skins of wild ducks. 
Skin of hawk. 

Sportsmen's equipment for wild 

(luck hunting. 
Photos. 

GROUP t2U 
Prodtscts of Hunting. 

I. I'ujikaiva Bros., Hokkaido — 

Furs and skins of ermines, foxes, 
])adgers, bears, squirrel and 
other wild animals. 

2. Koga, Tatsushiro, Okinazva- 

ken — 

Down of sea birds, '*Alioudori." 

3. Matsushita Kumatsuchi, Ha- 

kodate — 

Skins of sea otters, seals, col- 
ored skins of the same; sea 
leopards, ermines, yellow er- 
mines, red foxes, white foxes, 
badgers, beavers and colored 
skins of the same ; weasels and 
their colored skins. 

4. Nishimura, Chojiro, Tokyo — 
Furs and skins of ermines, wea- 
sels, big badgers, foxes, badg- 
ers, wild cats, etc. 



GROUP 122. 
FSshms: Equipment and Products. 

I. Hokkaido Flax McMufactur- 
ing Co,, Sapporo — 

Flax nettings: 

No. 16 — 5 cord mesh; 6 inch 
stretched ; depth, 50 meshes. 

No. 16 — 6 cord, mesh; 7 inch 
stretched ; depth, 60 meshes. 

No. 16 — 7 cord, mesh; 7 inch 
stretched; depth, 50 meshes. 

2. Imperial Fisheries Bureau, 
Tokio — 

S|>ecimens of: 
Sardines and aiichovies, 
Chub mackerel, 
Corals, 
Prawns, 

Growth of *Tai" (Pagrus), 
Oysters, 
Crabs, stuffeal. 

Illustration of corals. 

Illustration of prawns. 

**Aguri-ami" (a kind of purse- 
seine) improved. 

"Aguri-ami" in use (photos). 

Tunnv drift-net. 

Tunny long line. 

Tunny long-line fishing (pho- 
tos). . 

Yellow tail hand-line fishing 
(models and photos). 

**Tai** Shibari-ami (a scare-cord 
seine (photos). 

Trawler (model). 

Shark long line boat (model). 

Tunny long line boat (model). 

lUmito hand line boats (models). 



274 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Fishing boats (models) of Chiba 
and Kumamoto fishing experi- 
mental stations. 

Maps showing the distribution 
of important fish. 

Statistics relating to fishermen. 

3. fshii, Kotaro, Osaka — 
Cotton nettings. 

4. Japan Hemp and Fiax Manu- 

facturing Co., Tokio — 
Flax nettings for red salmon and 
long salmon. 

5. Kioto Fishing Line Manufac- 

turers' Association, Kioto — 
Fishing lines. 
Tsurimagai. 

2 cords, water-proof. 

3 cords, water-proof. 
Katayori cord, water-proof. 

3 cords Kimagai, water-proof. 
2 cords Kimagai. 

6. Local Government of Hokkai- 

do, Hokkaido — 
Herring fisheries (photo). 
Specimens of: 
Herrings, 
Fat herrings, 
Cod, 

**Suketodara'' (Gadus Chalco- 
gramnes, Pall). 

7. Nakamura, Rikichi, Tokio — 
Fishing rods for salmon and 

trout reels. 
Fishing rods. 
Fishing lines. 

8. Okajima Tsunegoro, Kioto — 
Silk dip nets. 

9. Yamanouchi Jisnke, Kioto — 
Artificial flies. 

Fishhooks. 



GROUP I23* 
Products of Fisheries* 

1. Black Coral .and Sea-Pen 

Manufacturers* Association, 

Tottori-ken — 
Black coral works. 
Walking sticks. 
Picture frames. 
Cigarette holders. 

2. Chhoa-kim, Formosa — 
Canes, made of the stem of sea- 
pen. 

3. Fishery School of Ishikawa- 

ken, Ishikawaken — 
Deviled crab. 

4. Fishery School of Yamaguch- 

iken, Yamaguchiken — 
Canned prawns. 

5. Fishing Experimental Station 

of Aichiken, Aichiken — 
Salt sardines. 
Sardines in oil. 

6. Fishing Experimental Station 

of Akitaken, Akitaken — 
Red herring. 

7. Fishing Experimental Station 

of Chibaken, Chibaken — 
Salt anchovies. 
Anchovies in oil. 

8. Fishing Experimental Station 

of Hokkaido, Hokkaido — 
Salt herrings. 

9. Fishing Experimental Station 

of Kagawaken, Kagawaken. 
Grey-mullet in oil. 

10. Fishing Experimental Station 
of Kochiken, Kochiken — 
Salt mackerel. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



275 



#"• 



r 

1 1 . Fishing Experihien tal Station 

of Kumamotoken, Kuntamo- 
token — 
Pickled eel3 in jelly. 

12. Fishing Experimental Station 

of Miyeken, Miyeken — 
Canned clams. 

13. . Fishing Experimental Station 

of Wakayama-ken, Wakaya- 
maken — 
Fish in pickle. 

14. Fishing Experimental Station 

of Yehimeken, Yehimekcn — 
Mackerel in oil 

15. Funabashi Fnkumatsu, Osa- 

ka — 
Shell buttons. 

16. Ilara Tameji, Osaka — 
Shell buttons. 

17. Harumoto lisuke, Osaka — 
Cod liver oil. 

Oil for watch movements. 

t8. Kashiwai, Insumi, Formosa — 
Top shells. 

19. Hatakeyama Yunosukc, Ishi- 

kawaken — 
'Maki Bun." 

20. Hemmi Tetsuji, Tokio — 
Canned oysters. 

21. Hoko Gikwai, Tokio — 
Clip fish. 

22. Ito Scntaro, Osaka — 
Cod liver oil. 

23. Japan Pelagic Fishing Co., 

Yaniaguchiken — 
Whale oil. 

24. Kawaguchi Gennosukc, Osaka 
Corals, coral works, necklaces, 

bracelets. 



25. Kho-lien-seng, Formosa — 
Top shells. 

26. Koga Tatsushiro, Okinawa- 

ken — 
Shells, top shells. 
Pearl oysters. 
Hoop shells. 
Trumpet shells. 
Pearls. 

27. Kama, Kazvashima; Nagaoka; 

Taketa, Shimaneken- — 
Black coral. 
• Black coral works. 
Canes. 

28. Masunaga Sankichi,, Formosa. 
Top shells. 

Cigarette holders. 
Shawl pins, etc. 

29. Mikimoio, Kokichi, Miye- 

ken — 

Pearls, cultivated. 

Pearls, natural. 

Bracelets. 

Brooch. 

•Scarf pins. « 

Blisters. 

Specimens of pearl oysters pre- 
served in alcohol. 

Pearl oyster- culture ground, 
drawing. 

30. Nagashima Ushitaro, Tokio- 

Fu — 
Green turtle soup. 

31. Nakamura, Gisnke, Osaka — 
Shell buttons for ladies. 

Coat buttons. 
Vest buttons. 
Underwear buttons. 
Hat buttons, 
(ilove buttons. 



276 



Japanese Exhibition, 



Collar buttons. 
Shirt studs. 

Specimens of shells showing the 
process of button making. . 

32. Nakamura, Sanpei, Kobe — 
Shell buttons, first and second 

class. 2 or 4 holes and other 

kinds. 
Materials of shell buttons. 
Hoop shells. 
Pearl ovsters. 
Ear shells. 
River mussels. 
Spindle shells. 
Top shells, etc. 

33. Nishibata. Tomonosukc, Osa- 

ka- 
Cod liver oil. 

34. Noshiro Jitsugyokicai, Akita- 

kcn — • 
Red herring. 

35. Oguri Kanpci, Osaka — 
Coral works. 

Mantel ornaments, representing 

birds, flowers, etc. 
Statues, etc. 
Bracelets. 
l)rooches. 

36. Ono Cho, Formosa — 
Top shells. 

^/. Osaka fuHori Merchants' As- 
sociation, Osaka — 
"Hoso-kanten.'' 

38. Osaka and Kioto Kanten 
Manufacturers' Association, 

Osaka — 
**Hoso-Kanten." 

3c;. Sui^a Kanten Manufacturers' 
Association of Shinano, Na- 
f^anoken — 
Kaku- Kanten. 



40. Takahashi, Gihei, Hokkaido — 
Smoked salmon. 

41. Takasu, Kenzo, Hiroshima- 

ken — 
Canned mackerel. 

42. iVaki, Takakage, Hiroshima — 
Canned oysters. 

43. Yakijiri Oil Makers' Associa- 

tion, Hokkaido — 
Herring oil (crude and refined). 

44. Vamada, Genbei, Osaka — 
Corals (pink, red and white). 
Coral works; 

Necklaces (pink, red, white). 
Bracelets (pink, red, white). 
Scarf pins (pink). 
Link cuflf buttons. . 
Mantel ornaments. 
Ash receivers. 
Cigarette holders. 
Inkstand. 
Coral beads. 

45. Yendo, Toramatsu, Shinmane- 

ken — * 

FJlack corals. 
Black coral works. 
Cigarette-holders and pipes. 
Umbrella handles. 
Pen holders. 

46. Yenoshima Shell Works' Asso- 

ciation, Kanagawaken — 
Shell works. 
Toys. 

Ash receivers. 
Ladle, etc. 
"Hossugai" (Hyalonema) and 

"Kishago" (UnlxMium). 
Sperm whale oil. 
Bottle-nose oil. 
Cod liver oil. 
Cod oil refined. 



> 



EXHIBITS Of IMPEHIAI. INSTITUTE OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE- PALACE OF EDUCATION 



SOCIAL ECONOMY, 



EXHIWTS Of T 



E RED CROSS ASSOCIATION OF JAPAN IN THE JAPANESE PAVILION. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



277 



Shark oil (two kinds). 
Herring oil (crude and refined). 
Fat herring oil. 
Sardine oil, refined. 
Sardine oil, paper filtered. 
Sardine oil, cloth filtered. 
Sardine oil, wax, refined. 
Whale oil, refined. 

GROUP 124. 

Fish Culture. 

Ikomagun Fishery Associa- 
tion, Naraken — 
Fish pond (model and photos) 
with the specimen of gold fish, 
-Lanchu" and "Wakin." 



2. Imperial Fishery Bureau, 

Tokio — 

Oyster culture in Hiroshima-ken 
and saga-ken (photos). 

**Haigai" (Area Granosa) cul- 
ture (model) with the speci- 
mens of the shell-fish showing 
its growth. 

3. Local Government of Hokka- 

ido, Hokkaido — 

Chitose hatchery (model and 
photos) with specimens of sal- 
mon and "kabacheppo" (red 
fish) and a brief note on the 
hatcherv. 



278 Japanese Exhibition, , 



■^ 



•■ \ 



CHAPTER XIII. 
Department of Anthropology. 

Exhibits. 

GROUP J28. 

Ethnogfraphy* 

I. Formosan Government ^ Taiho- 
ku, Formosa — 

Photographs of the native man- 
ners and customs. 

Pictures of the natives. 

Map showing distribution of the 
native tribes. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 



279 



CHAPTER XIV. 
Department of Social Economy. 

Exhibits, 



GROUP J29. 
Social and Economic Conditions* 



I. Imperial Patent Bureau, To- 
kio — 

Notes on patent, design and 
trademark. 

GROUP J39. 

Charities and Corrections. 

I. Japan Police Association, To- 
kio — 

Uniforms and equipments worn 
by policemen at different peri- 
ods. 

Portraits and photographs of 
prominent police officials in 
olden and modem times. 

Books and documents relating to 
the police. 

The modem police equipment. 

Secret service exhibits. 

Ancient and modem methods of 
identifying criminals by pho- 
tographs or descriptions. 

Photographs and drawings of 
ancient and modern police sta- 
tions. 

Special historical subjects. 

Qassification of crimes. 

Method for the prevention of 
crime. 

Galler)' of criminals. 

Gallery of depressed characters. 



2. Japan Red Cross Society, To- 
kio — 

Charts. 

Tables. 

Photographs. 

Publications. 

Medals of membership. 

Magic lantern pictures. 

Uniforms of relief stuff and ma- 
terial for nursing (installed in 
Japanese Pavilion). 

GROUP 140. 

Public Health. 

I. Imperial Institute for Infec- 
tious Diseases, Tokyo — 

Pathological, histological and 

bacteriological preparations. 
Instruments and apparatus. 
Antierysifelasic liquid tubercu- 

line. 
Antityphoid serum. 
Antidysenteric serum. . 
Vaccine of typhoid fever. 
V^accine of dysentery. 
Typhus-toxine. 
Cholera-toxine. 
Antityphoid serum. 
Antidysenteric serum. 
Asakawa's diagnostic liquid for 

typhoid fever. 
Kitashima's diagnostic liquid for 

tuberculosis. 
Koch's original tubercline. 
Newest tubercline. 
Tubercle-bacillus (gice) e. 2 Tb. 



2So 



Japxxesk Exhibition, 



Tb. nuclein. 
T. R. 

Kitasato's clayfilter. 
Kitasato's rat-holder. 
Kitasato's mouse-holder. 
Kitasato's araerobe dishes. 
Shibayama's trocar. 
Teruuchi's araerobe flask. 
Model of rabbit with rabbit 

holder. 
Oshida's spinal cord extractor. 
Spinal cord of hydrophobia (sic") 
Street-virus of hydrophobia. 
Fixed virus of hydrophobia. 
Spinal cord of hydrophobia, 

(pres. in glycerine). 
Vaccine of hydrophobia. 
Microphotogpraphs. 
Photographs. 
Plate culture of bacille. 
Test-tube culture of bacille. 
Model of spinal cord extraction. 

2. Imperial Serum Institute, 
Tokyo — 

Appliances, instruments and 
preparations used in medicine 
and surgery. 

Diphtheria-antitoxine, Xo. i. 

Diphtheria-antitoxine, No. 2. 

Diphtheria-antitoxine, No. 3. 

Diphtheria-antitoxine, sice. 

Tetanus-antitoxine, No. i. 

Tetanus-antitoxine, No. 2. 

Tetanus-antitoxine. sice. 

Cholera serum. 

Cholera vaccine. 

Pest serum. 

Pest vaccine. 

Diphtheria-toxine. 

Tetanus-toxine. 



Diphtheria baccilus, sice. 

V'enom of trimeresurus. 

Venom of trigonscephalus. 

Pest-toxine. 

Pest serum, sice. 

Diphtheria-antitoxine. 

Tetanus-antttoxine. 

Trimeresurus antitoxine sennn, 

Tuberculotyminacid. 

T. P. 

Tub. F. 

Syringe for injecting toxines. 

Skeleton of trimeresurus. 

Trigonocephalus blomhofbi. 

Eggs of trimeresurus. 

Poison-fang of trimeresurus. 

Model of injection of toxine. 

Model of collecting blood. 

Table of cases of diphtheria. 

3. Imperial Lymph Institute, 
Tokyo — 

Appliances, instruments and 
preparations used in medicine 
and surgery; tables. 

Sato's vaccinating utensils for 
child. 

L'meno's vaccinating utensils for 
calf. 

Calf lymph (putting up). 

Model of vaccinated calf. 

Stuffed skin of calf. 

Tablet with painted figures. 

1-6 appearance of vesicles on 
vaccinated calf. 

7-8 appearance of vesicles on 
vaccinated calf. 

Tables of .the experiments on the 
propagation of diluted vaccine 
from calf to calf. 

Tables of the results of inocula- 
tion. 



i 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 281 



'* 



> 






CHAPTER XV. 
Department of Physical Culture, 

Exhibits. 

GROUP 143. 
Games for Children and Adults. 

1. I to Takufu, Hongo, Tokio — 
Tennis rackets. 

2. Nakamura Kohei, Osaka — 
Bow strings. 

Tennis rackets. 

3. Nishiyama Jinbei, Osaka — 
Row strings. 



i 



1 



"1 






APPENDIX 



^ 



9 



t 



:i 



\ 



APPENDIX. 



*•**» 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

The Kin = 16o momme = 1.325 lb. avoirdupois. 

Kwan = 1,000 momme = 8.281 lbs. ** 

Skaku = .994 toot. 

Sun = 1. 193 inches. 

Ken=tshaku . . = 5.965 feet. 

ChD =60 ken = iV mile, 5.4229 chains 

Ri z= -^6 chd = 2.44 miles. 

Ri sq = 5.6552 sq. miles. 

CA5, land measure = 2.45 acres. 

Koku, liquid = 39.7033 gallons. 

** dry = 4.9629 bushels, 

7b, liquid = 3.9703 gallons. 

'* dry = 1.9851 pecks. 

I metre = 3.3 shaku. 

1 gram = 0.26667 momtne (A momme). 



i> 



/! 



t 



ik 






Supplement to the Official Catalogue of the 
Exhibits of the Japanese . Empire. 



DEPARTMENT OF ART. 
, GROUP 9. 

j Page 54, Column i. — Ando, Jubei, Nagoya. Bowl, cloisonne, made 

by Kawade Shibataro, should be transferred to Ando's exhibition 
in Group 14, page 58. 

DEPARTMENT OF LIBERAL ARTS. 

GROUP 15. 

Add the following exhibition : 

2a. Kobayashi, Bnnshichi. 

Wood prints. 

GROUP 24. 

T. Page 73, Exhibit No. 4, for Hayashi Kunitaro, read Hayashi 
Kunimatsti, 

2. Page 75, after exhibit No. 32 add the following exhibit: 

32a. Okai, Zensakn, Iwahaslii, Osaka — 

Doilies. 
Envelopes. 

DEPARTMENT OF MANUFACTURES. 

GROUP 30. 

(JOI.I) AND Sll.VKRSM nils' WoRK. 

(additions.) 

22a. Koizumi, Gcnsaburo, Ibaraki-ken — 

\'ase. 
r>ell. 

47a. Takata, Shinkyo, Vushima Tcnjin-cho, Hongo, Tokyo — 

Mantel ornament. 
P^Iower vases. 



I 



2 Japanese Exhidition, 

Cloisonne Works. 

(addition.) 

12a. Hayashi, Kimbci, Aichi-ken — 

. Flower vases. 
Tablet frame. 
Incense box. 

27a. I to, Masuyemon, Nishitobc, Yokohama — 

Incense box. 
Flower vase. 
Tray. 
Dishes. 

6 1 a. Shibata, Matakichi, Kobe — 

Flower vases. 

GROUP 33. 

( ADDITION. ) 

18a. Iwai, M'^asaburo, Manjuji Takakura Hagashi-iru — 

Flower vases. 

18b. Ishikazvaken Kinzoku Shul^pin Kumiai, I shikaiva-ken — 

Flower vases. 

Mantel ornaments. 

Dishes. 

Incense boxes. 

Cigarette cases. 

Flower ix)ts. 

Card receivers. i 

Beer cups. 

Paper weights. 

Match cases. 

Lamp stands. 

Bowl. 

Flower dishes. 

Ash receivers. 

Lanterns. 

Frame tablet board. 

Candle stick. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 3 

GROUP 34. 

Lacquer Works, 
(additions.) 

Kikuchi, Ycijiro, Kifatahara-cho, Asakusa-ku, Tokyo — 

Cigar case. 
Tablet frame. 

Yubti, Uyemon, Toyama-kcn — 

Photograph frame. 
Stands. 

F\NCY Articles. 

Strike out the following exhibits: 

35. Yubii, Uyemon, Toyama-ken — 

Photograph frame. 
Stands. 

Add the following exhibit: 

Taika Hat and Mat Manufacturing Co., Byoritsu, Formosa — 

Doilies. 

GROUP 38. 

(additions.) 
I. Ando, Bokko, Tokyo — 

Folding screens. 

3. Fujiwara, Ihei, Hachiman-cho, Osaka — 

Folding screen. 

Table. 

Cabinet. 

Cake vessels. 

Box. 

Tablet. 

4. Fuknnaga, Jihci, Sonrcaki Naka 2 Chomc, Osaka — 

Folding screens. 
Screen. 
Curtains. 

Photograph frames. 
Tapestry. 



Japanese Exhibition, 

5. Fukunaga, Sennosukc, Siikiya-cho, Nihonbashi-ku, Tokyo- 

Bookcase. 

7. Higuchi, Hikoycmon, Kitakiutaro Machi, Osaka — 

Folding screens. 

8. Honda, Tokujiro, Tennoji, Uyeno-Miva-cho, Osaka — 

Cabinet. 
Flower vase. 

9. Horiuo, Riuco, IJtsuho Kamidori, Osaka — 

Giairs. 
Folding bed. 

10. Ichishima, Asajiro, Konya-cho, Kanda-kii, Tokyo — 

Bookcases. . 

IX. Ikcda, Scisuke, Shinmonzcn Umevioto-cho, Kyoto — 

Folding screen. 

12. Ishizcki, Sanctaro, Minamitemma-c/io, Kyobashi-ku, Tokyo- 

Bookcase. 

13. Iwamoio, Ku^i.'asahitro, Higashigokcn-cho/Tokyo — 

Bookcase. 
I'olding screens. 

14. Kako, Hikojiro, Kyoto — 

F'olding screens. 

15. Kato, Dcnshichi, Tajima-cho, Osaka — 

Bookcase. 

16. Kikuchi, Yeijiro. Kitataivara-cho, Asakusa, Tokyo — 

Folding screen. 

17. Kiniura, Shigcia, Niigata^— 

Chairs. 

Table. 

Bed. 

18. Kobayashi, Toycntoti, Tori 2 C/ionic, Nihonbashi-ku, Tokyo- 

Hat rack. 
Toilet bureau. 

ig. Minakami, Isaburo, Niigata — 

lUireau. 

20. Momoi, TatsKo, Moiohama Machi, Yokohama — 

Bookcase. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. j 

21. Nakai & Company, Kobe — 

Chairs. 
Bench. 
Tables. 
Cabinets. 
Tea cabinet. 
Flower vase stand. 
Music stand. 
Mirror frame. 
Umbrella stand. 
Folding screens. 
Stove screens. 

22, Nakamura, Sakujiro, Nakabashi, Kostivu-cho, Kyobashi-ku, To- 
kyo — 

Bookcase. 

23. Negishi, Kakujiro, Suyehiro-cho, Kmida-ku, Tokyo — 

Framed pictures. 
Mantel ornament. 

24. Ogawa, Nihci, Hinouye-cho, Osaka — 

Folding screens. 
Screen. 

25. Oka, Ihei, Hachiman-cho, Osaka — 

Table. 
Stands. 
Coffee travs. 

26. Ono, Yukichi, Gorobei-cho, Kyobashi-ku, Tokyo — 

Chairs. 
Table. 

Writing desk. 
Bookcase. 

27. Ouchi, Tatsusabnro, Ibaragi-ken — 

Screen. 

28. Sano, Kashichi, Shinyemon-cho, Kyobashi-ku, Tokyo — 

Screens. 

29. Sasaki, Vamonta, Niigata — 

Box. 

Tobacco box. 
Table. 
Bookcase. 



Japanese Exhibition, 

30. Seshimo, Ycizaburo, Hachiman-cho, Osaka — 

Cabinet. 

Tables. 

Coffee travs. 

Stands. 

Cigar box. 

Flower basin. 

Flower basin stands. 

31. Scto, Ycisaburo, Ifachiman-machi, Osaka — 

Cabinet. 
Table. 
Travs. 
Stands. 
Cigarette box. 
Flower vase. 

32. Shikko GoshikivaishOy Yumi-cho, Kyobashi-ku, Tokyo — 

Bookcase. 

Tables. 

Cabinet. 

33. Shimamiira, Shingo, Tera-machi, Shijoagaru, Kyoto — 

Bookcases. 

Desk. 

Table. 

Chairs. 

Folding screens. 

34. Sugita, Kogoro, Tsukiji, Tokyo — 

Cabinet. 

35. Siiaumura, Kinjiro, Takakura-dori, Gojoagaru, Kyoto — 

Folding screens. 

36. Takikaxva, Kichitaro, Tottori — 

Screen. 

Folding screen. 
^7. Tamitra, Shubci, Minamikiutaro-inachi, Osaka — 

Folding screens. 

38. Toknoka, Sakiibci, M inamikinhoji-machi, Osaka — 

Folding screen. 

39. Tcrada, Jisabitro, Tcra-niachi, Matsnbara Kitayeiru, Kyoto- 

Framed pictures. 
Folding screens. 

40. Tsttjimura, Ycntaro, Tausu-cho, Shitaya-ku, Tokyo — 

Screen. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 

41. Uyeda, Naoshkhi, Kitakiithoji-machi, Osaka — 

Folding screens. 

42. IVakaye, Ikusaburo, Minamihon-machi, Osaka — 

Shelf. 

43. iVatano, Kichiji, Yokohama — 

Folding screens. 

44. Yarnanaka Company, Kitahama, Osaka — 

Tables. 

Chairs. 

Double chair. 

Fancy chair. 

Sofas. 

Bookcase. 

Cabinet. 

Flower pot stands. 

Lamp stands. 

Wall hanging. 

Framed picture. 

Folding screens. 

Flower vessel. 

Bowls. 

Lanterns. 

45. Yarnanaka, Seishiclii, Minamihoriye Kami-dori, Osaka- 

Cabinet. 

46. Yasuda, Mitsnsuke, Hachiman-cho, Osaka — 

Cabinet. 
Tables. 

47. Yendo, Yasuhani, Uchida-machi, Yokohama — 

Sideboard. 
Cabinet. 
Mirror stand. 
Table. 
Settee, 
Desk chair. 
Tea chair. 
Roman chair. 
Rocking chair. 
Easy chair. 
Dragon chair. 
Lady's chair. 
Stand. • 
Picture frame. 
Sign board. 



1 



8 Japanese Exhibition, 

GROUP 43. 

Carpkts. Tapestries and Fabrics for Upholstery. 
(Palaces of Varied Industries and Manufactures.) 

(additions.) 

1. Aoki, Hachiyemon, Shi^a-kcn — 

Tapestry. 
Tablets. 

2. Akao, Zenjiro, Hyogo-kcn — 

Mattings. 

3. Bungo Matting Trading Association, Oita-ken — 

Mattings. 

4. Chikngo Matting Trading Association, Fukuoka-ken — 

Mattings. 

5. Fnji^vara, Ichimatsu, Osaka-fu — 

Carpets. 

6. Hanamushxro Domcikwai, Fukui-ken — 

Mattings. 

7. Higashi Kokuto Gun Matting Trading Association, Oita-ken — 

Mattings. 

8. Hiroshima-ken Matting Trading Association, Hiroshima-ken — 

Mattings. 

9. Ishikawa-ken Export Matting Traders' Association, Ishikawa- 

ken — 

Mattings. 

10. Isosaki, Takasahuro, Okayama — 

Mattings. 

11. Ishimori, Mobci, Hyo go-ken — 

Mattings. 

12. I none, Yoshibei, Kyoto — 

Bed spreads. 

13. Japan Carpet Co. — 

Carpets. 

14. Kazi'ashima, Jimbci, Hishiya-cho, Kyoto — 

Brocade tapestry. 

15. Kobayashi, Tobci, Tori Ahura-cho, Tokyo 

Table cloth. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 

16. Kawase, Kambei, Tera-wachi-dori, Kyoto — 

Carpets. 

17. Kishi, Yosoji, Nagasaki — 

Carpets. 

18. Kori, Sadahei, Jbaraki-ken — 

Carpets. 

19. Koyama & Co., Osaka-fu — 

"Sakai" caqjets. 

20. Kobe Matting Dealers' Association , Kobe — 

Mattings. 

21. Kojinia, Zenshiro, Hyogo-ken — 

Carpets. 

22. Kasamatsii, Toshiro, Hyogo-ken — 

Yamato carpets. 

23. Mayeda, Kaneshichi, Tomisa^va-cho, Tokyo — 

Curtain and table cloth. 

24. Nambu Matting Trading Association, Oita-ken — 

Matting. 

25. Nayemura, Tokuji, Hyogo-ken — 

Mattings. 

26. Nozazva & Co, — 

Mattings. 

27. Okabe, Naosaburo, Hon-rnachi, Osaka — 

"Okabe" carpets. 

28. Okamoto, Masakichi, Osaka-fu — 

Carpets. 

29. Okayania-ken Matting Trading Association, Okayama-ken 

Mattings. 

30. Okajima, Chiyozo, Nakanoshima, Osaka — 

Bed spread stuff. 

Table and chair covering stuff. 

31. Ogura, Shotaro, Hyogo-ken — 

Mattings. 

32. Ojima, Nagakiyo, Hyogo-ken — 

Carpets. 

33. Ryoyen, Goshikaisha, Kobe — 

Mattings. 



lo Japanese Exhibition, 

34. Shibata, Matakichi, Hy ago- ken — 

Mattings. 

35. Shibabayashi, Sotaro, Namba, Osaka — 

"Naniwa ori'' curtain. 
*'Nani\va ori" curtain stuff. 

36. Sugazi'a, Kiyoshi, Hon-cho, Yokohama — 

Table cloth. 

Embroidered and open-work linen. 

Sample of teneriff. 

37. Sanyen Company, Kagazva-ken-^ 

Matting. 

38. Shimodate Bussan Orimono Co., Ibaraki-ken — 

Carpets. 

39. Sugino, Kurakichi, Junket Machi, Osaka — 

"Miyabi" carpet. 

40. Takikawa, Kichitaro, Tottori-kcn — 

*'Yuzen" tapestry. 

41. Tamiya, Vosnke, Ibaragi-ken — 

Carpets. 

42. Urata, Masahochi, Iz^atc-kcn — 

Mattings. 

43. IVakano, Sobei, Osaka-fu — 

Cotton carpets. 

44. Yamanaka Co., Kitahama, Osaka — 

Carpets. 

45. Vamano, Zinbei, Hyogo-kcn — 

Mattings. 

46. Yutaka Carpet Manufacturing Co., Hyogo-ken 

Yutaka carpets. 

GROUP 44, 

Upholsterers' Decorations. 
(Palaces of Varied Industries and Manufactures.) 

(additions.) 

1. fujiicara, Ihei, Hachiman-cho, Osaka — 

Folding screen. 

2. Nislvkazva, Genjiro, Sakai-machi, Kyoto — 

Shades. 
Folding screen. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. n 

3. Ogawa, Nihei, Hinouye-cho, Osaka — 

Shades. 

4. Onishi, Yo, Gifu-ken — 

Folding screen. 
Wall hanging. 
Photograph holders. 
Letter holders. 
Shades. 

Window curtains. 
Tapestry. 

5. Shibabayashi, Sotaro, Namba, Osaka — 

Shades. 

6. Shoyei Gomcikzvaisha, Kitano, Osaka — 

Bead shades. 

7. Tamura, Chojiro, Tera-machi, Kyoto — 

Shades. 

8. Tcrajima, No born, Shimomactsn-cho, Nagoya — 

Shades. 

9. Uyeda, Tozacmon, 
Uychira, Yahci, 

Shades. 

10. Yokoyama, Shinichiro, Tokyo- 

Bead shades. 



I Shiga-kcn — 



GROUP 57. 

(Palace of Manufactures.) 

(additions.) 

17a. Fuso-kz<'a)i, Nagano-ken — 

Raw silk. 

46a. Hodakasha, Nagano-ken — 

Raw silk. 

GROUP 6t. 

(additions.) 

71a. Miyakc, Tamizo, Kobe — 

Chip braids. 

124a. Torikaij Yotaro, Yokohama — 

Chip braids. 



I 



12 Japanese Exhibition, 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRiaTY. 

GROUP (n. 

(yVDniTIONS.) 

Koran Goshikzvaisha, Saga-ken — 

Insulator. 

Knop. 

Clat. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

GROUP 84. 

All the tea exhibits in Group 90 should be transferred to this 
group as follows : 

2a. Ang-hu-sin, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

3a. Bak-keit'San, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

3b. Be-sin-khiom, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Pouchong tea. 

4a. Central Tea Union, Tokio — 

Japan Tea Manufacturing Company. 

Japan Tea Exporting Company. 

Sekiyo Tea Company. 

Eushimi Investment Company. 

Kushu Tea Exporting Company. 

Fuji & Company. 

ShizHoka Tea Company. 

Tokai Tea Trading Company. 

Shimada Tea Company. 

Makinohara Tea Company. 

Okasa Tea Company. 

Fujiye Tea Company. 

Nakamura Tea Company. 

Kioyeki Tea Trade Association. 

Yamamura & Co. 

Kagimoto National Product Company. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 13 

Kioto Sagara-Counfy Tea Traders' Association (Ito Kozai- 
mon, Mori Yeisuke, Tomaki Kamekichi, Koyama Kane- 
kichi, Mizoda Biinkichi). 

Brick tea. 

**Gyokiiro" (choicest). 

Green tea. 

Black tea. 

4b. Cheng-shong-hei, Toshiyen, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

4c. Chcng'liong-hai, Toshiyen, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

4d. Chhi-piang-hu, Toshiyen, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

4e. Chhoa-lip, Toshiyen, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

4f. Chiam-bcng-ick, Tailwku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

4g. Chiam-hok-san, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

4IK Chiam-ki-siong, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

41. Chiu-bun-chhiang, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

4i. Chinn-chheng-piaii, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Pouchong tea. 

4I:. Chiun-ka-iu, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

4]. Chu'SH-hun, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

8a. Formosan GoT'ernment, Japan — 

Tea. 

loa. Go-bun-siu, Taihoku, Formosa — 

(3olong tea. 

lob. Go-chi-hicH, Taihoku, Aichi-kcn — 

Oolong tea. 

c6a. loug-ki-licn, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

!()b. lu-hou-chhcng, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolone tea. 



14 Japanese Exhibitiox, 

i6c. hi'ki'siong, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

!6d. lun-khicn-chi, Taihoku, Fortnosa — 

Oolong tea. 

19a. Jap-bun-chin, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

19b. Jap'kijit'tian, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

22a. Khu-kai'Sck , Taihoku, Formosa — 

Pouchong tea. 

22b. Koeh'tsun-ung, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Pouchong and Oolong tea. 

22c. Ko-tsui'Scng, Shinko, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

22d. Ko-heng, Shinko, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

22e. Ko'kim-kict, Shinko, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

22f. Ko'teng, Shinko, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

27a. Leng-chhun-lim, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

27b. Liau-kim-kiong, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

27c. Li'ban-ku, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

27d. Li-hui, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

27e. Lim-lioug-tck, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

27f. Lim-scng-hcin, Taihoku, Formosa — 

(Oolong tea. 

lyg. Li'pek'Chin, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

2711. Li'tcug'lioui;, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

36a. Na-tiok-chai, Toshiyen, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 15 

36b. Ng-beng-sim, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

36c. Ng'Chheng'Scng, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Pouchong tea. 

40a. Ong-chheng-hun, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Pouchong tea. 

40b. Ong-hong-chheng, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Pouchong tea. 

43a. Peh'Chief-soan, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Pouchong tea. 

43b. Po-i'iam, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

45a. So'liong-tcng, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

45b. So'Sien-giok, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

47a. Tan-chu-scng, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Pouchong tea. 

47b. Tan-giok'lo, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Pouchong tea. 

47c. Tan-heug'hong, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

47d. Tan-hui'Soat, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Pouchong tea. 

47e. Tan-kai'Seng, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Pouchong tea. 

47f. Tan-kcug'ki, Shinko, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

47g. Tan-ki'ju, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

47h. Tan-kong'Sut, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Pouchong tea. 

47i. Tan-Ucn-hui, Shinko, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

47J. Tan-lim-en^, Shinko, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

47k. Tan-siong-piau, Taihoku, Formosa — 

pjjuchong tea. 



i6 Japanese Exhibition, 

47I. Tansiti'le, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

47m. TaH'Stii-seug, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

47n. Tan-fai-iin, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Pouchong tea. 

470. Tan-tck'jiong, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

47p. Tan-thicn-lai, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

47q. Tea Traders' Association, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Pouchong tea. 
Oolong tea. 

47r. Tcng-peng-hui, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

47s. Tiang-teng'%\}ong, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

47t. Tin-un-iong, Taihoku, Formosa — 

Pouchong tea. 

47U. Tiun-chiam-khoe , Taihoku, Formosa — 

Pouchong tea. 

47V. Tiun-kiefi'Setig, Shinko, Formosa — 

Oolong tea. 

GROUP 87. 

Add the following exhibits: 

8a. Inada, Tokutaro, Hiroshima-ken — 

Vermicelli. 

13a. Matsuda, Shinshichi, Hyogo-ken — 

Vermicelli. 

13b. Mizva Vermicelli Traders' Association, Nara-ken — 

Vermicelli. 

17a. Ogi Vermicelli Traders' Association, and Miyoshi Vermuelii 
Traders' Association, Saga-ken — 
Vermicelli. 

i8a. Saga-ken Ka^uzaki J^ermicelli Traders' Association, and Kanzaki- 
gun Vermicelli Traders' Association, Saga-ken — 
Vermicelli. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 17 

GROUP 89. 

1. Pages 209, 210 and 211, for Dried nepbelium longana, read 

Dried Nephelium tongana. 

2. Transfer No. 16 and No. 20 to Group 90. 

GROUP 90- 

1 . Add the following exhibits : ' 

23a. Formosa Sugar Mnnufacinring Co,, Hosan, Formosa — 

Sugar. 

31a. Hotta, Seiyemon, Aichi-ken — 

Shovu. 

31b. Ito, Kosayemon, Miye-ken — 

Shoyu. 

48a. Kitanwra, Shinji, Miye-ken — 

Shovu. 

It 

91a. Ong-sut-long, Tainan, Formosa — 

Sugar. 

127a. Tanaka, Dcnshin, Aichi-ken — 

Shoyu. 

144a. Yamauchi, Shoso, Aichi-ken — 

Shoyu. 

2. Transfer exhibits Nos. 16 and 20, Group 89, to this group, as 

follows : 

54a. Koeh'toan-Iai, Tainan, Formosa — 

Sugar. 

62a. Lo-kcng-tan, Tainan, Formosa — 

Sugar. 

GROUP 95. 

1. Exhibitor No. i, lor TaiJwkn, read Shinchiku, 

2. Pp. 219 and 220, for Zini^iber, read Turmeric. 

3. Add the following exhibits : 

Azca Indigo Manufacturers' and Merchants* Association, Toku- 
shima-ken — 

Indigo made after ''Nagai" system. 



i8 Japanese Exhibition, 

DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY. 

GROUP U2. 

I. Page 230, column i, line 7, to page 231, column i, line 27, read 
as follows : 

Arundinaria Hindsii Munro. 

Arundinaria Hindsii Munro, var. Graminea 
Bean. 

Arundinaria japonica S. et Z. 

Arundinaria Marmorea, Makino. 

Arundinaria Narihira Makino. 

Arundinaria quadrangularis, Munro. 

Arundinaria simoni, S. et Z. Riv. 

Arundinaria simoni, S. et Z. Riv. var. Chino, Ma- 
kino. 

Arundinaria Totisk Makino. 

Bambusa, nana, Roxb. 

Bambusa, nana, Roxb. var. normalis Makino. 

Bambusa, palmata, Marliac, forma nebulosa, Ma- 
kino. 

Phyllostachys bambusoides, S. et Z. 

Phyllostachys liambusoides, S. et Z., var. aurea 
Makino. 

• 

Phyllostachys bambusoides, S. et Z., var. Cassil- 
lonis, Makino. 

Phyllostachys Marliaceae Makino. 

PhvUostachvs Mitis. Riv. 

Phyllostachys Mitis. Riv., var. tteterocycla, Ma- 
kino. 

PhvUostachvs Puberula Munro. 

Phyllostachys Puberula Munro var. Boryana 
Makino. 

Phyllostachys Puberula Munro var. nigra, Ma- 
kino. 

Phyllostachys Puberula Munro var. nigra, Ma- 
kino, forma nigropunctata, Makino. 

Sasa poniculata, ^lakino et Shibata. 

Sasa barealis, Makino. 



• International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 19 

2. Page 231, column i, line 28, to page 238, line 23, read: 

Gingkoaceae. 
Gingko biloba, L. (I cho). 

Taxaccae. i 

Podocaipus macraphylla Don. (Maki). 
Podocarpus Xageia, R. Br. (Nagi). 
Cephalotaxus drupaceae, S. et Z. (Inugaya). 
Torreya nucifera» S. et Z. (Kaya). 
Taxus ciispidata, S. et Z. (Ichii). 

Abietinae. 

Pinus densiflora, S. et Z. ( Aka-matsu ) . 
Pinus Thunbergii Pari (Kuro-matsu). 
Pinus Koraiensis, S. et Z. (Chosen-matsu). 
Pinus parviflora, S. et Z. (Himeko-matsu). 
Pinus pumila, Pall. (Hai-matsu). 
Larix leptolepis, Gord. (Kara-matsu). 
Picea hondoensis, Mayr (Tohi). 
Picea bicolor, Mayr. (Hari-mome). 
Picea polita, Carr. (Matsu-hada). 
Picea ajanensis, Fisdi. (Ezo-matsu). 
Picea Glehni. Mast. (Shinko-matsu). 
Tsuga Sieboldi, Carr. (Tsuga). 
Tsuga diversifolia, Maxim (Kometsuga). 
Pseudotsuga japonica, Shirasawa (Togasawara). 
Abies firma, S. et Z. (Momi). 
Abies homolepsis, S. et Z. (Dakemomi). 
Abies \^eitchii Lindl. (Shiramomi). 
Abies Mariesii, Mast. (Aomori-todomatsu). 
Abies sachalinensis. Mast. (Todomatsu). 
Tbujopsis dolabrata, S. et Z. (Hiba). 
Tbuja japonica, Maxim. (Kurobe). 
Chanicecyparis obutusa, S. et Z. (Hinoki). 
Cham(ecy])ans pisifera, S. et Z. (Sawara). 
Cryptomeria japonica, Don. (Sugi). 
Gunningbamia sinensis, R. Br. (Koyosan). 
Sciadopytis vertiollata, S. ct Z. (Koya-maki). 
Jnniperus rigida, S. et Z. ( Xezumi-sashi). 
Junipenis cbinensis, L. (Byakusbin). 
Junipenis cbinensis, L. var. procumbens, Endl. 
(Hai-bvakusbin). 



20 Japanese Exhibition, 



Juglandaccp, 

Platycarya strobilacea, S. et E. (No-gurumi). 
Pterocarva rhoifolia, S. et Z. (Sawa-gurumi). 
Juglans sieboldiana Maxim. (Oni-gurumi). 
Juglans regia L. var. sinensis Cas. (Teuchi- 

gurumi). 
Juglans corcliformis, Maxim. (Hime-gurumi). 

Myricacce. 
Myrica rtibra, S. et Z. (Yama-momo). 

Salicaecc. 

Populus tremula, L. var. villosa, Wesm. (Yama- 

narashi). 
P'opulus balsamifera, L, var. suaveolens Loud. 

(Deronoki). 
Salix Buergeriana Miq. (Osaruko-yanagi). 
Salix Caprea L. ( Saru-yanagi ) . 
Salix purpurea L. var. multinervis (Fr. et Sav.) 

Matsumura ( Kori-yanagi ) . 
Salix viminalis L. (Kinu-yanagi). 
Salix opaca Anders. ( Onoe-yanagi ) . 
Salix triandra L. var. nipponica (Fr. et Sav.) v. 

Seemen ( Tachi-yanagi ) . 

Bctulacccc. 

Carpinus laxiHora, r>l. (Aka-shide). 

Carpinus yedoensis, Maxim. (Inu-shide). 

Carpinus Japonica, Bl. (Kuma-shide). 

Betula alba, L. var. communis, Rgl. (Ma-kamba). 

Bctula alba, L. var. vulgaris, Dc. (Shira-kamba). 

l)etula Corylifolia Rgl. et Max. (Urajiro-kamba). 

Betula Ermanni Cham. var. nipponica, Maxim. 

(Take-kamba). 
Betula globispica, Shirai. (Jizo-kamba). 
Betula Maxiniowicziana, Rgl. (Udai-kamba). 
Betula Bhojpattra, Wall. var. typica, Rgl. (Ono- 

ore). 
Ainus japonica, S. et Z. (Hannoki). 
Alnus viridis, DC. var. Sibirica. Rgl. (Miyama- 

hannoki). 
Alnus incana, Willd. var. glauca. Ait. (Yama- 

hannoki). 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 21 

Alnus glutinosa, Willd. var. japonica Matsumura 

( Kawara-hannoki ) . 
Alnns emerginata, Matsumura. (Yahazu-han- 

noki). 
Alnus nrma, S. et Z. (Yashabushi). 
Alnus firma, var. multinervia, Rgl. (Hime-yasha- 

bushi). 
Corvlus rostrata Ait. var. Sieboldiania Maxim. 

( Tsuno-hashibami ) . 

Fagus sylvatica, L. var. Sieboldi. Maxim. (Buna- 

noki). 
Fagus japonica, Maxim. (Inubuna). 
Castanea vulgaris Lam. var. japonica, DC. (Kuri). 
Pasania cuspidata, Oerst. (Shiinoki). 
Pasania glabra, Oerst. ( Mateba-shii ) . 
Quercus glandulifera, Bl. (Konara). 
Quercus grosseserrata, Bl. (Mizu-nara). 
Quercus crispula, Bl. (O-nara). 
Quercus aliena, Bl. (Xara-gashiwa). 
Quercus dentata, Thumb. (Kashiwa). 
Quescus variabilis, Bl. (Abe-maki). 
Quercus serrata, Thunb. (Kunuki). 
Quercus acuta, Thunb. (Aka-gashi). 
Quercus \'ibrayeana Fr. et Sav. (Shira-kashi). 
Quercus glauca, Thunb. (Ara-kashi). 
Quercus myrsinaefolia, Bl. (Urajiro-gashi). 
Quercus sessilifolia, Bl. (Tsukubane-gashi). 
Quercus phyllireoides A. Gr. (Imame-gashi). 
Quercus gilva, Bl. (Ichii-gashi). 
Quercus thalassica, Hce. (Shirifuka-gashi). 

VhnQCC(£. 

Ulmus campestris Sm. (Harunira). 

Ulmus campestris Sm. var. vulgaris Planch. 

(Kobu-nira). 
Ulmus parv'ifolia, Jacq. (Akinire). 
Zelkowa Kcaki, Sicb. (Keyaki). 
Celtis sinensis, Pers. (Enoki). 
Aphananthe aspera. Planch. (Mukunoki). 



22 Japanese Exhibition, 



Moracece, 
Marus alba L. var. stylosa (Kuwa). 
Cudrania triloba Hce. (Hari-guwa). 
Broussonetia Kazinoki Sieb. (Kozo). 
Broiissonetia papyrifera^ Vent. (Kajinoki). 
Ficus erecta Thunb, (Inu-biwa). 
Ficus erecta var. Sieboldi King. (Hosoba-inu- 

biwa). 
Ficus Wightiana, Wall. var. japonica Miq. 

(Ako). 
Ficus retusa L. var. Nitida Miq. (Gatsumaru). 

Protcacece. 
Helicia cochinchinensis Lour. (Yamamo-gashi). 

Santalacccc. 
Buckleya quadriala B. et H. (Tsukubane). 

Magnoliacece. 
Magnolia hypoleuca, S. et Z. (Honoki). 
Magnolia Kobus, DC. (Kobushi). 
Magnolia parviflora, S. et Z. (Oyamarenge). 
Magnolia salicifolia, Maxim, (Tamu-shiva). 
Michelia compresa, Maxim. (Ogatamanoki). 
Illicium Anisatum, L. (Shikimi). 

Trochodcndracccc. 
Cercidiphyllum japonica, S. et Z. (Katsura). 
Euptclaca polyondra, S. et Z. (Fusa-zakura). 
Trochdendron aralioides, S. et Z. (Yama-gur- 
uma). 

Bcrbcridacecc. 
Berberis Thunbergii, DC. (Me-gi). 
Berberis Sielx)ldi, Miq. (Hirohano-hebinobora- 

zu). 
Nandina domestica Thunb. (Nanten). 

Mcnispcrmacccc. 
Coccuhis laurifolius DC. (Koshu-Uyaku). 

Lauracecc. 
Cinnaniomum Camphora, Xees. (Kusu-noki). 
Cinnamomum peduncu latum, Nees. (Yabu-nik- 
kei). 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 23 

Cinnamomum sericeum Sieb. (Maruba-nikkei). 
Machilus Thunbergii, S. et Z. (Tabunoki). 
Michilus Thunbergii var. japonica Yatabe (Awo- 

gashi). 
Litsea glauca, Seib. (Shiro-damo). 
Litsea japonica Tuss. (Hama-biwa). 
Lindera strychnifolia Vill. (Tendai-uyaku). 
Lindera triloba, Bl. ( Shiro-mozi ) . 
Lindera obtusiloba, Bl. (Dankobai). 
Lindera umbellata Thunb. (Kanakugi-noki). 
Lindera glauca, Bl. (Yama-kobashi). 
Lindera sericea, Bl. (Kuro-moji). 
Actinopodophne lancifolia Meisn. (Kago-gashi). 
Actinopodophne acuminata Meisn. (Ao-kagon- 

oki). 

Saxifragacece. 

Deutzia scabra Thunb. (Utsugi). 

Philadelphus coronarius L. var. Satsumi Maxim. 

( Baika wa-utsugi ) . 
Hydrangea paniculata Sieb. (Nori-noki). 
Hydrangea scandens Maxim. (Goto-zuni). 
Schizophragma hydrangeoides, S. et Z. (Yuki- 

kazura). 

Pittosporacccc. 
Pittosporum Tobira, Ait. (Tobera-no-ki). 

Hawamclidacece. 

Hamamelis japonica, S. et Z. (Mansaku). 
Distylium racemosum, S. et Z. (Isu-no-ki). 

Rosaccce. 

• 

Pirus Toringo Sieb. (Zumi). 

Pirus Aria, L. var. Kamaonensis Wall. (Urajiro- 

noki). 
Pirus Miyabei, Sargent. (Azuki-nashi). 
Pirus aucuparia Gaerten. var. japonica Maxim. 

(Xanakamado). 
' Pirus sambucifolia, Ch. et Schl. (Miyama-nana- 

kamado ) . 
Prunus macrophylla, S. et Z. ( Bakuchi-noki ) . 
Prunus Grayana, Maxim. (Uwamizu-zakura). 



24 Japanese Exhibition, 



Prunus Siori Fr. Schm. (Shiurizakura). 
Prunus Buergeriana, Miq. (Inu-zakura). 
Prunus pseudo-cerasus Lindl. var. spontanea, 

Maxim. (Yama-zakura). 
Prunus spinulosa, S. et Z. (Rimboku), 
Prunus incisa Thunb. (Mame-zakura). 
Photinia villosa, Dene. (Kama-tsuka). 
Amelancliier asiatica, C. Koch. (Zaifuri-boku). 
Photinia glabra, Thunb. ( Kaname-mochi ) . 
Kerria japonica, DC. (Yamabuki). 
Bhaphiolepis japonica, S. et Z. (Sharimbai). 

Lcgiiminosa. 

Sophcra japonica, L. (Enju). 
Sophora platycarpa, Maxim (Fuji-ki). 
Sophora Sikokiana ]Makino (Yuku-noki). 
Cladrastis amurensis, B. et H. var. floribunda, 

Maxim (Inu-enju). 
Albizzia Julibrissin, Boiv. (Xemu-noki). 
Lespedeza bicolor Jurcz. (Hagi). 
Gleditschia japonica, Miq. (Saikachi). 

Rutacccc. 

Zanthoxykmi piperitum, DC. (Sansho). 
Zanthoxylum schinnifoHum, S. et Z. (Inu-zan- 

sho). 
Oroxa japonica Thunb. (Kokusagi). 
Skimmia japonica Thunb. (Miyama-shikimi). 
Phellodendron amurense, Rupr. (Kiwada). 

Simarnbacca\ 
Picrasma ailanthoides, PI. (Xigaki). 

McliacccE, 
Melia japonica, Don. (Sendan). 

Euphorbiacca:. 

DaphniphylUim macropodum, Miq. (Yuzuriha). 
Daphniphylkim glaucescens, Bl. (Hime-yuzu- 

riha). 
Mallotus japonica, Muell, Arg. (Akame-gashiwa). 
Excoecaria japonica, Muell, Arg. (Shiroki). 
Sapium sebiferum Roxb. (Xankin-haze). 



International ExpositioxV, St. Louis, 1904. 25 

BiiXQcecs. 
Buxus sempervirens, L. (Asama-tsuge). 

Anacardiacece. 

Rhus vernicifera, DC. (Urushi). 
Rhus trichocarpa Miq. (Yama-urushi). 
Rhus succedanea, L. (Haze-noki). 
Rhus silvcstris, S. et Z. (Yama-haze). 
Rhus scmi-altata Murr. var. Osbeckii, T)C, (Fushi- 
noki). 

Aquifoliacccp, 

Ilex crenata, Thunb. (Inu-tsuge). 
Ilex pedunculosa, Miq. (Soyogo). 
Ilex rotunda, Thunb. (Kurogane-mochi). 
Ilex Integra, Thunb. (Mochi-noki). 
Ilex latifolia, Thunb. (Tarayo). 
Ilex Oldharmi, Miq. (Xanami-noki). 

Cclastracecc. 

Euonymus curopaea, L. var. Hamiltoniana Maxim 

( Mayumi ) . 
Euonymus alata, C. Koch. (Xishiki-gi). 
Euonymus oxyphylla, Miq. (Tsuri-bana). 
Euonymus japonica, Thunb. (Masaki). 

Staphyleacccc, 

Staphylea Ikimalda, S. et Z. (Mitsuba-utsugi). 
Euscaphis staphyleoides, S. et Z. (Gonzui). 
Turpina pomifera DC. var. nepalensis Hiem. 
(Yama-deki). 

Accracccc. 

Acer palmatum, Thunb. (Kaede). 

Acer Tschonoskii Maxim. (Mine-kaede). 

Acer micranthum, S. et Z. (Ko-minekaede). 

Acer parviflonim, Fr. et Sav. (Telsu-kaede). 

Acer pictum, Thimb. (Itaya-kaede). 

Acer purpurascens, Fr. et Sav. (Kaji-kaede). 

Acer spictum Lam., var. ukurunduens Maxim 

(Ogara-bana). 
Acer japonica, Thunb. (Hauchiwa-kaede). 
Acer argutum, Maxim. ( Asanoha-kaede). 
Acer crataegifolium, S. et Z. (Me-urinoki). 



26 J.\p\NESE Exhibition, 



Acer Ginnala, Maxim (Karakogi-kaede). 
Acer distylum, S. et Z. (Hitotsuba-lcaede). 
Acer nikcense, Maxim (Megusuri-noki). 
Acer carpini folium, S. et Z. (Yamashiba-kaede). 
Acer rufinerve, S. et Z. (Urihada-kaede). 

Hippocastanacecr. 
Aesculus turbinata, Bl. (Tochi-noki). 

Sapindacecc. 
Sapindus Mukurosi, Gaertn. (Mokuroji). 
Koelreuteria paniculata, Laxm. (Mokugenji). 

Sabiacecr. 
Meliosma myriantha, S. et Z. (Awabuki). 
Meliosma tenuis, Maxim (Miyama-hohoso). 
Meliosma pungcns, Wall. (Yama-biwa). 

Rhamnacccc. 
Berchemia racemosa, S. et Z. (Kuma-yanagi). 
Rhamnus crenata, S. et Z. (Iso-noki). 
Microrhamnus frangulioides, Maxim (Neko-no- 

chichi). 
Hovenia dulcis, Thunb. (Kemponashi). 

Llacocarpacc(e, 
Elaeocarpus photinioefolia, H. et A. (Magashi). 
Elacocarpus japonica, S. et Z. (Koban-mochi). 

Tiliacecp. 
Tilia cordata, Mill. var. japonica, Miq. (Shina- 

no-ki). 
Tilia cordata, Miqueliana, Maxim (Bodaiju). 
Tilia cordata, Maximovvicziana, Shirasawa (Oba- 

bodaiju). 
Tilia cordata, Kiusiana, Makino et Shirasawa 

(Hera-no-ki). 

Tlieacecc. 
Thea japonica, (L) Nais (Tsubaki). 
Stewartia pseudocamellia, Maxim (Natsu- 

tsubaki). 
Eurya ochnacca, Szysz. (Sakaki). 
Eurya japonica, Thunb. (Hi-sakaki). 
Taonabo japonica, Szysz. (Mokkoku). 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 2; 

Stachyuracea:. 
Stachyunis praecox, S. et Z. (Ki-fuji). 

Gutiferce. 
Hypericum chinense L. (Biyo-yanagi). 

Flqconrtiacece. 
Iclesia polycarpa, Maxim (li-giri). 

Thymelcececr. 
Edgeworthia chr>'santha, Lindl. (Mitsumata). 

Elcragnacecc. 
Elaignus umbellata, Thunb. (Aki-gumi). 

Lythracecc. 
Lagerstroemia indica L. ( Sarii-suberi ) . 

Rhizophoraceoc. 
Jambosa vulgaris, DC. (F'utomomo). 

Araliacccc. 

Fatsia japonica Dene, et Plane. (Yatsude). 
Aralia sinensis, L. (Tara-no-ki). 
Dendrodanax japonica Seem. (Kakure-mino). 
Acanthopanax ricinifoHum, S. et Z. (Hari-giri) 
Acanthopanix sciadophylloides, Fr. et Sav. (Koshi- 

abura). 
Acanthopanix innovans, .Fr. et Sav. (Takano- 

tsume). 
Helwingia rusciflora, Willd. (Hana-ikada). 

Cornacccc. 

Cornus Kousa Buerg. ( Yama-boshi ) . 
Cornus officinalis, S. et Z. (sanshiyu). 
Cornus macrophylla, Wall. (Mizuki). 
Cornus ignorata, C. Koch. (Kumano-mizuki). 
Marlea platanifolia, S. et Z. (Urinoki). 
Aucuba japonica, Thunb. (Aoki). 

Clcthracccc. 
Clethra barbinervis, S. et Z. (Ryobu). 



28 Japanese Exhibition, 



Ericacecr. 

Rhododendron Mettemichii, S. et Z. (Shaku- 

nage). 
Rhododendron Keiskei Miq. (Hikage-tsutsuji). 
Rhododendron dilatatum Miq. ( Mitsuba-tsu- 

tsuji). 
Tripetaleia paniculata, S. et Z. (Ho-tsutsuji). 
Pieris japonica, Thunb. (Asebi). 
Leucothce Grayana Maxim (Hanahiri-noki). 
Leucothoe Keiskei Miq. (Iwa-nanten). 

Sopotacea. 
Sideroxylon ferrugineum, H. et A. (Aka-tetsu). 

Symplocoaecc. 

Symplocos crataegoides, Ham. (Sawa-futagi). 
Symplocos myrtacea, S. et Z. (Hai-no-ki). 
Symplocos prunifolia, S. et Z. (Kuro-bai). 
Symplocos japonica, DC. (Kuroki). 
Symplocos neriifolia, S. et Z. (Mimizu-bai). 
Symplocos spicata Roxb. (Kanzaburo-noki). 

Styracacece. 
Halesia corymbosa (Asagara). 
Sty rax japonica, S. et Z. (Ego-no-ki). 
Styrax Obassia, S. et Z. (Haku-umboku). 

Oleacecr. 
Fraxinus Bungeana, DC. var. pubinerves, Wg. 

(Toneriko). 
Fraxinus longicuspis, S. et Z. (Aotago). 
Fraxinus Sieholdiana, Bl. (Shioji). 
Ligustrum Ibota, Sieb. ( Ibota-no-ki ) . 
Ligustrum japonica, Thunb. (Xezumi-mochi). 
Osmanthus Aquifolium, B. et H. (Hiiragi). 
Osmanthus fragrans Lour. (Mokusei): 

Borraginacecc. 
Ehretia macrophylla, Wall. ( Maruba-chishanoki ) . 

Vcrbenacecc. 
Callicarpa japonica, Thunb. (Mi-murasaki). 
Vitex Xegundo, L. (Xinjin-boku). 
Clerodendron tricotomum (Kusagi). 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 29 

ScrophulariacecF, 
Paulownia tomentosa, Thunb. H. Bn. (Kiri). 

Bignoniace(r, 
Catalpa Koempferi, S. et Z. (Ki-sasage). 

Caprifiacece, 
Viburnum clilatatum, Thunb. (Gamazumi). 
Viburnum Sieboldii Miq. (Gomagi). 
Viburnum tomentosum, Thunb. ( Yabu-demari ) . 
Viburnum opulas, L. (Kamboku). 
Viburnum furcatum, Bl. (Mushikari). 
Viburnum odoratissimum, Ker. (Sango-ju). 
Diervilla grandiflora, S. et Z. (Hakone-utsugi). 
Diervilla japonica, DC. (Tani-utsugi). 

3. Page 239, column 2, line 8, for Myrsinaefolia, read glanca. 

4. Page 239, column 2, strike out lines 24 and 25. 

5. Page 240, column i, lines 15 and 16, read Litsea glanca Sieb, 

(Shirodamo). 

6. Page 241, column i, lines 24 and 25, read Screen made of Juglaus 

Sieboldiana. 

7. Page 243, column 2, line 31, for pnperida, read pubertila. 

8. Page 246, column 2, line 3, read *'Hanshimen.'* • 

9. Page 246, exhibit No. 19, for ''Shoro Tsiiso/* read "Shoro^' and 

''TsHSo'' (paper plant). 

DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND METALLURGY. 

GROUP ns. 

I. Page 251, column 2, line i, for steel zcire drilling rope, read steel 
zi'ire drilling rope socket, and strike out the next line, socket. 

GROUP ii6. 

I. IXc^e 252, exhibit Xo. i, for Pig. Sennin Ore, read Fig, Sennin 
iron mine. 

Exhibit No. 2, for province, read colliery. 

Page 253, column i, line 3, for Isudo-Kosei, read Tsudo-Kosei, 

Page 253, column i, line 17, for ycblsn, read yebisii. 

Page 253, column i, strike out lines 21 and 22. 

Page 253, colunm 2, line 4, for coal, read coke. 

Ibid, lines 5, 8, 11, 14, 17, 20, strike out icith zinc blend. 



3 

4 

5 
6 



30 



Japanese Exhibition, 



8. Page 254, column i, line 7, for tuyfj read tuif. 

9. Ibid, line 19, for Ilozaite, read Ilvaite. 

10. Ibid, line 25, for se,, read etc. 

11. Page 254, after line 42, add : 

1. Dressed pea-size ore from jigger, Ashio Copper Mine. 

2. Dressed ore from jigger, Ashio Copper Mine. 

3. Waste from jigging small ore, Ashio Copper Mine. 

4. Waste from jigging fine ore, Ashio Copper Mine. 

5. Waste from Wilfry table slime, Ashio Copper Mine. 

6. Dressed ore from jigger, Furokura Copper Mine. 

7. High grade selected ore, Innai Silver Mine. 

8. Low grade selected ore, Innai Copper Mine. 

9. Dressed ore from jigger, Furokura Copper Mine. 

10. Concentrates, Innai Silver Mine. 

11. Tailing from settler, Innai Silver Mine. 

12 Page 254, column 2, line 3, for Aptite, read Apatite. 

13. Ibid, line 15,* for Sanivai, read Sanmai. 

14. Ibid, line 19, for Propyrite, etc., read Porphyrite granite, Safimai, 

Ani Copper Mine. 

15. Ibid, line 21, for Sanmai Shinkiri, read Sanmai Shinkiri vein, 

Ani Copper Mine. 

16. Ibid, lines 22, 23 and 24, read Tuif breccia with fossil shell, 

Sanmai Shinkiri Odaie, Ani Copper Mine. 

17. Page 255, cohimn i, after line 27, insert Collection of Sulphur. 

18. Page 255, column i, the exhibition of the Imperial Geological 

Survey consists of the following items : 

I. MiXKRALS. 



I 
2 

3 

4 

5 
6 



/. Elements. 

Graphite (Kawai, Hida). 

Native sulphur (Yonago, Shinano). 

Xative sulphur (Shirane, Kozuke). 

Native arsenic (Akatani, Echizen). 

Xative arsenic in Liparite (Akatani, Echizen) 

Native bismuth (Ikuno, Tajima). 

Native platinum ( Yubarigawa, Ishikari). 



8 
9 

lO 

II 

12 

14 

15 
1 6 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 31 

Iridosmine (Yubarigawa, Ishikari. 

Native copper (Osaruzawa, Rikuchu). 

Native copper in slate (Makimine, Hyuga). 

Native silver in quartz geode (Innai, Ugo). 

Native silver on argentiferous quartz vein (Ikuno, Tajima). 

Native mercury in sandstone (Minato, Hyuga). 

Gold nugget (Ezashi, Kitami). 

Native gold on quartz (Yamagano, Osumi). 

Native gold on quartz (Zuiho, Formosa). 



//. Compounds of Sulphur, Selenium, Tellurium, Arsenic, Antimony 

and Bismuth. 

17. Realgar (Monji, Rikuzen). 

18. Orpiment (Osorezan, Mutsu). 

19. Stibnite (Ichinokawa, lyo). 

20. Stibnite (Ichinokawa, Lyo). 

21. Stibnite (Ichinokawa, Ivo). 

22. Stibnite (Ichinokawa, lyo). 

23. Bismuthinite in Calco-quartzose \tm (Sannotake, Buzen). 

24. Molybdenite (Shirakawa, Hida). 

25. Molybdenite (Kawachi, Echigo). 

26. Blende with Calcite on Rock Crystal Aggregate (Ani, Ugo). 

27. Blende (Shiraita, Echigo). 

28. Blende with Rhodochrosite (Saimyoji, Ugo). 

29. Pyrrhotine (Yoshioka, Bitchu). 

30. Pyrites (Osaruzawa, Rikuchu). 

31. Pyrites (Udo, Izumo). 
2i2. Pyrites (Sagi, Izumo). 

33. Pyrites (Ani, Ugo). 

34. Pyrites (Akadani, Echigo). 

35. Marcasite (Ani, l^go). 

36. Marcasite (Osaruzawa, Rikuchu). 
}^7, Arsenopyrite (Furigusa, Mikawa). 

38. Galena and Chalcopyrite on Rock Crystal Aggregate (Ani, 

Ugo), 

3Q. Galena and Rhodochrosite on P>rcccia (Kuratani, Kaga).) 

40. Galena with Chalcopyrite and Calcite (Daira, Ugo). 

41. Argentite in Rock Crystal Druse (Ikuno, Tajima). 

42. Argentite in Rock Crystal Druse (Aikawa. Sado). 

43. Chalcosine (Omodani, Fchizen). 

44. ' PetzUe in Quartz X'ein, Telluric Gold (Setamai, Rikuzen). 



32 Japanese Exhibition, 

45. Cinnabar (Komagaeri, Yamato). 

46. Cinnabar in Calcite (Suii, Awa, Shikoku). 

47. Cinnabar (Okiichi, Satsuma). 

48. Bomite (Ikuno, Tajima). 

49. Chalcopyrite (Ani, Ugo). 

50. Chalcopyrite with Rock Crystal Aggregates (Kuriyama, 

Shimotsiike). 

51. Chalcopyrite in Rock Crystal Aggregates (Arakawa, Ugo). 

52. Chalcopyrite with Rock Crystal Aggregates (Arakawa, 

Ugo). 

53. Matildite in Quartz Vein (Kuriyama, Shimotsuke). 

54. Jamesonite (Innai, Ugo). 

55. Pyrargyrite in Quartz Vein (Innai, Ugo). 

56. Tetraheclrite on Rock Cystal Aggregates (Kiura, Bungo). 

57. Stephanite in Rock Crvstal Geodes with Pvrites (Innai, 

Uro). 

58. Stephanite (Innai, Ugo)'. 

59. Stannite on Chalcopyrite (Ikuno, Tajima). 

///. Oxygen-Compounds of Elements. 

60. Rock Crystal (Otomezaka, Kai). 

61. Rock Crystal (Otomezaka, Kai). 

62. Rock Crystal (Otomezaka, Kai). 

63. Rock Crystal (Otomezaka, Kai). 

64. Rock Crystal (Tanabe, Kii). 

65. Rock Crystal (Xarushima, Hizen). 

66. Rock Crystal (Tashiro, Mino). 

67. Rock Crystal with Actinolite Enclosures, Prase (Takemori, 

Kai).' 

68. Rock Crystal (Kimpuzan, Kai). 

69. Smoky Quartz ( Xaegi, Mino). 

70. Smoky Quartz (Takayama, Mino). 

71. Smoky Quartz (Tanokamiyama, Omi). 
y2. Smoky Quartz (Tanokamiyama, Omi). 
y2t' Amethyst (Obara, Iwaki). 

74. Rose Quart/ (Tozawa, Iwaki). 

75. Ferruginous Quartz (Hanawa, Rikuchu). 

76. Chalcedony (Aikawa, Sado). 
jy. Chalcedony (Xatani, Kaga). 

78. Chalcedony (Oguni, Uzen). 

79. Tridymite (Ishigamiyama, Higo). 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 53 

80. Rutile (Takayama, Mine). 

81. Cassiterite en Sandstone (Takano, Hitachi). 

82. Cassiterite, Stream Tin (Takayama, Mino). 

83. Pyrolusite (Nisembets, Shiribeshi). 

84. Sapphire (Takayama, Mino). 

85. Hematite, Specular Iron (Sennin, Rikuchu). 

86. Cuprite (Nishi-tada, Settsu). 

87. Chalcotrichite on Malachite (Arakawa, Ugo). 

88. Tenorite (Kosaka, Rikuchu). 

89. Opal (Tsuno, Buzen). 

90. Opal (Natani, Kaga). 

91. Hyalite (Tateyama, Etchu). 

92. Hyalite (Tateyama, Etchu). 

93. Siliceous Sinter (Tateyama, Etchu). 

94. Manganite (Owani, Mutsu). 

95. Linionite (Kotaki, Ugo): 

Il\ Haloid Salts. 

96. Horn Silver on Manganese Ore (Tsubaki, Ugo). 

97. Fluorite (Obiru, Bungo). 

98. Fluorite (Ikimo, Tajima). 

1\ Carbonates, Manganite and PUnnbate. 

99. Iceland Spar (Odaki, Musashi). 
100. Calcite (Furokura, Rikuchu^). 
loi. Calcite (Osanizawa, Rikuchu); 

102. Calcite (Ani, Ugo). 

103. Calcite (Maze, Echigo). 

104. Calc Sinter (Kawachi, Hitachi). 

105. Dolomite (Innai, Ugo). 

106. Magnesite (Kuratani, Kaga). 

107. Smithonite (Kamioka, Hida). 

108. Rhodochrosite (Saimyoji, Ugo). 

109. Rhodochrosite (Kuratani, Kaga). 
no. Siderite (Uchinokuchi, Bungo). 

111. Siderite (Omori, Iwami). 

112. Witherite (Tsubaki, Ugo). 

113'. Aragonite (Takasegawa, Shinano). 

114. Cerussitc on Quartz (Kisanmori, Ugo). 

115. Cerussite (Arakawa, Ugo). 

116. Malachite (Hisan-ichi, Ugo). 



34 



Japanese Exhibition, 



117. [Malachite (Ani, Ugo). 

118. Azurite (Hiyoshi, Bitchu). 

119. Psiloinelane (Niimadate, Ugo). 

120. Asbolite (Seto, Owari). 

rV. Sulphates, Molybdate and IVolframatcs. 

121. r»arytcs with Jamesonite Enclosures (Kuratanii Kaga). 

122. Barytes CTsubaki, Ugo). 

123. Barytes (Aikawa, Sado). 

124. Barytes (Osaruzawa, Rikuchu). 

125. Wulfenite ( Kami-Wakogo, Ecbizen. . , 

126. Scheelite (Kamikane, Kai)* 

127. Scheelite in Argentiferous Quartz Vein . (Sannotakc, 

Buzen). * ' . - - 

128. Scheelite in Argentiferous Quartz Vein (Ikuno, Tajima). 

129. Reinite (Otomezaka, Kai), 

T30. Wolframite ( Takayama, Mino). 

131. Ferberite in Quartz- ( Kurasa wa:, Kai). 

132. Alnnitc (Tochihara, HariiTia.)^ : . . i- 

133. Linarite (Arakawa, Ugo). : 
J 34. Gypsnni (Yagosawa, Kai). 

I'll. Fcr rites., . , , . . 

135. Chroniite (Yakeyama, Chikuzen)'; ' 

136. Chromite in Serpentine (Mukawa, Iburi). 

137. Magnetite ( Kamaishi, Rikuchu). 

138. Magnetite in Ouartzite (Ogiishi, Hizen). 



] III. Pliosphatcs, Arsenates, Xiobates and Tantalates. 

139. l^Vrgusonite (Takayama, Mino). 

140. Colunibite ( Yamanoo, Hitachi). 

141. Apatite (I\Iiyamoto, Kai). 

142. Apatite ( Ashio, Shimotsuke). 

143. Apatite (Kurokura, Sagami). . 

144. Pyromorphite on Ouartz-ix)rphyry (Kamioka, Hida). 

145. TJbethenite on Rock Crystal Aggregates (Arakawa Ugo) 

146. X'ivianite in Clay (Kimpozan, Higo). 

147. X'ivianite (Ashio, ShimotsukeJ. . ■ 

148. Scurodite (Kiura, Bungo). 



1 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 35 

IX. Silicates and Titanatcs, 

T49. Heniimorphite (Kiiira, Bungo). 

150. Andalusite in Pegmatite (Ishikawa, Iwaki). 

151. Topaz in Intergrowth with Smoky Quartz (Tanokamiyama, 

Onii). 

152. Topaz (Tanokamiyama, Omi). 

153. Topaz (Tanokamiyama, Omi). 
[54. Topaz (Takayama, Mino). 

155. Topaz (Takayama, Mino). 

156. Topaz (Takayama, iJlino). 

157. Topaz (Takayama, Mino). 

158. Topaz (Naegi, Mino). 

159. Datolite with Axinite (Yamaura, Hyuga). 
i(io. Datolite with Axinite (Yamaura, Hyuga). 

161. Tourmaline (Takayama, Mino). 

162. Tourmaline ( Ishikawayama, Iwaki). 

163. Tourmaline ( Jshikawayama, [waki). 

164. Tourmaline (Goshodaira, Shinano). 

165. Lievrite (Zomeki, Xagato). 
t66. Lievrite (Kamioka, Hida). 

167. Epidote (Takeshi, Shinano). 

168. Epidote ( Kamaishi, Rikuschu). 

169. Vcsuvianite (Kiura, Bungo). 

170. Vesuvianite (Kiura, Bungo). 

171. Danburite (Obira, Bungo). 

172. Danburite (Obira, Bungo). 

173. Garnet (Ariminc, Ktchu). 

174. Garnet ( Shimohogi, Xagato). 

175. Garnet in Druse with Diopside and Quartz ( Kamaishi. Riku- 

chu ) . 

17^). Garnet ( Ishikawayama, Iwaki). 

177. Garnet (Yamanoo. Hitachi). 

178. (lamet in Pegmatite (Ishikawayama. Iwaki). 
170. Axinite ( Obira, Bungo). 

180. Axinite (Yamaura, Hyuga). 

181. Axinite (Obira, P>ungo). 

182. Axinite (Obira, Bungo). 

183. Hiotite ( MiyanK^o, Kai). 

184. Zinnwaldite (Tanokamiyama, Omi). 

18c;. Muscovite and Sniokv Ouartz in Othoclase (Tanokami- 
vania, Omi). 



36 Japanese E-\hibitiox, 

186. Muscovite (Tanokamiyama, Omi). , 

187. Qilorite as Druse in Magnetite (Kamaishi, Rikuchu). 

188. Talc (Og-ushi, Hizen). 

189. Cordierite in Volcanic Ejecta (Asamayama, Shinano). 
too. Pinite after Cordierite (Doshi, Kai). 

T91. Diopside and Epidote in Druse (Kamaishi, Rikuchu). 

192. Hedenbergite (Obira, Bungo). 

[93. Hedenbergite (Obira, Bungo). 

194. Augite ( Tateshinayama, Shinano). 

195. Augite (Kami-Sano, Kai). • 

196. Wollastonite (Komiyagami, Mino). 

197. Rhodonite (Innai, Ugo). 

198. Rhodonite (Oyamada, Mikawa). 
T99. Actinolite (Gorotsuyama, Tyo). 

200. Actinolite (Gorotsuyaraa, lyo). 

201. Hornblende (Hiyoshi, IJitchu). . • 

202. Hornblende (Hakusan, Kaga). » ■ •' 

203. Hornblende (Kiirun, Formosa). ' 

204. Beryl (Ishikavvayama, Iwaki). 

205. Beryl (Tanokamiyama, Omi). 

206. Beryl (Tanokamiyama, Omi). 

207. Orthoclase (Miyamoto, Kai). 

208. Orthoclase (Tanokamiyama, Omi). 

209. Orthoclase with Smoky Quarts (Tanokamiyama, Omi). 

210. Orthoclase (Tanokamiyama, Omi). 

211. Orthoclase (Tanokamiyama, Omi). 

212. Orthoclase (Tanokamiyama, Omi). 

213. Orthoclase with Smoky Quartz (Naegi, Mino). 

214. Amazonstone (Miyamoto, Kai). 

215. Andesine (Shioda, Shinano). 

216. Andesine (Iwojima, Volcano Islands). 

217. Anorthite (Miyakejima, Izu). 

218. Titanite in Diorite (Kamioka) Hida). 

219. Apophyllite in Druse in Tuff (Maze, Echigo). . 

220. Apophyllite ( Maze, Echigo) . . . 

221. Apophyllite and Analcime in Druse inuTuff (Maze, Echigo). 

222. Chabasite (Hishikari, Satsuma). 

223. Analcime (Maze, Echigo). 'T 
^24. Heulandite (XJgasawarajima)-. 



International Expoj^ition, St. I.ouis, 1904. 37 

Specimens of Large Size. 

648. Apatite and Rock Crystal on Copper Ore ( Ashio, Shiniot- 

suke) . 

649. Stibnite (Ichinokawa, lyo). 
()50. Stibnite (Ichinokawa, lyo). 

651. Topaz (Takayama, Mino). 

652. Stibnite (Ichinokawa, lyo). 

653. Stibnite (Ichinokawa, lyo). 

654. Rock Crystal (Kurasawa, Kai). 

655. Rock Crystal ( Kurusawa, Kai). 

656. Rock Crystal (Takemori, Kai). 

657. Calcite, Blende and Chalcopyritc (Ani, Ugo). 

658. Alabandine (Saimyoji, Ugo). 

659. Quartz after Barytes (Arakawa, Ugo). 
r/)0. Danburite and Garnet (Obiro, Bungo). 

661. Rhodochrosite. I51cnde and Pyrites (Kuratani, Kaga). 

662. Apophyllite and Analcime (Maze, Echigo). 
()6^. Calcite (Innai, Ugo). 

r)64. Rock Crystal and Stibnite (Ichinokawa, lyo). 

665. Galena with Pyrites, Calcite and Quartz (Daira, Ugo). 

666. Reinite (Otomezaka, Kai). 

667. Rock Crystal (Kurasawa, Kai). 
(/)8. Axinite (C)bira, Bungo). 

2. RocK.s. 

The specimens of rocks here exhibited, include most of the typical 
ones found in Japan. They are arranged according to their geological 
formations with their corresponding localities as follows : 

A. Mf.tamorphic Rocks. 

/. Gneiss. 

22^. Granite Gneiss ( Shimotsukawa, Iwaki). 

22(). Granitic Cineiss ( Kami- Koch i, Hitachi). 

22'^. Augen-gneiss ( Shioda, Awaji). 

22^. Porphyritic Gneiss (Takato, Shinano). 

22<). Biotite-gneiss ( Kamada, Iwaki). 

230. Muscovite-gneiss (Hase, Hitachi). 

J31. Mica-schist ( Shi mo-mat sukawa, Iwaki). 

2^2. Mica-schist with Andahtsite (Hase, Hitachi). 

27^7,. Mica-schist ( Misakubo, Totomi). 



38 Japanese Exhibition, 

234. Crystalline Limestone (Takanuki, Iwaki). 

235. Cipoline ( Kambaratoge, Hida). 

236. Amphibolite (Tamadare, Hitachi). 

237. Amphibole-gneiss (Tamadare, Hitachi). 

238. Amphibole-schist (Ishizumi, Iwaki). 

239. Qiiartzite (Ishizumi, Iwaki). 

//. Crystalline Schist, 

240. Sericite-schist (Tokushima, Awa, Shikoku). 

241. Sericite-schist ( Sueno, Musashi). 

242. Sericite-schist (Oboke, Awa, Shikoku). 

243. Piedmontite-schist (Tokushima. Awa, Shikoku). 

244. Piedmontite-schist (Minano, Mushashi). 

245. Picdmontite-quartzite (Tokushima, Awa, Shikoku). 

246. Glaucophane-sericite-schist (Tokushima, Awa, Shikoku). 

247. Glaucophane-cericite-schist (Tokushima, Awa, Shikoku). 

248. Porphyritic Sericite-gneiss (Mie, Hizen). 

249. Porphyritic Sericite-gneiss (Mie, Hizen). 

250. Spotted Graphite-schist (Yanaze, Musashi). 

251. Spotted Graphite-schist (Mie, Hizen). 

252. Graphite-schist (Mie, Hizen). 

253. Graphite-schist ( Yamashirodani, Awa, Shikoku). 

254. Spotted Chlorite-amphibolite (Tokushima, Awa. Shikoku). 
-.55- Spotted Chlorite-amphibolite (Yanaze, Musashi). 

P.. Sedimentary Rocks. 

/. Palcvocoic. 

256. Amphibolite ( Mihara, Kozuke). 

257. Amphibolite (Negishi, Iwaki). 

258. Pyroxenite (Sakahara, Kosuke). 

259. Crystalline Limestone (]\Iayumi, Hitachi). 

260. Crystalline Limestone (Yuzurihara, Kozuke). 

261. Adinole Slate (Mamba, Kozuke). 

262. Adinole Slate (Hibara, Kozuke). 

263. Quartzite ( Heibara, Kozuke). 

264. Schalstein ( Kodaira, Kozuke). 

265. Radiolarian Slate (Shitsumi, Wakasa). 

266. Limestone (Kuroda, Kozuke). 

267. Schalstein (Ka.shiwagi, Kozuke). 

268. Schalstein (Kodaira, Kozuke). 

269. Schalstein ( Maue, Musashi). 



International Exposition. St. Louis, 1904. 



39 



270. Schalstein (Takozu, Rikuchu). 

271. Greywacke Sandstone (Kagahara, Koziike). 

272. Homstone (Yono, Kozuke). 

273. Limestone (Kagahara, Koznke). 

274. Schwagerina Limestone (Akasaka, Mino). 

275. Brecciated Limestone (Akasaka, Mino). 

276. Metamorphosed Limestone with Aiigite (Sahlite) (Okaza- 

kiyama, Yamashiro). 

2,Tf, Clay-slate (Ashio, Shimotsuke). 

278. Ottrelite-slate (Miyata, Hitachi). 

279. Mica-slate' (Yamaguchi, Hitachi). 

280. Hornstone (Metamorphosed) (Xyoidake, Yamashiro). 

281. Andalusite-slate (Shirasu, Yamashiro). 

282. Cordierite-slate ( Okazakiyama, Yamashiro). 

283. Cordierite-slate (Shirasn, Yamashiro). 

284. Macaceous Sandstone (Wayama, Riknchn). 

//. Mcsozo'ic. 

285. Shale (Innai, Rikuzen). 

286. Clay-slate (Ogachibama, Rikuzen). 

287. Shale with Daonella (Sakawa, Tosa). 

288. Schalstein with Pentacrinus (Aohama, Ikizen). 

289. Schalstein (Morihiro, Nagato). 

290. Conglomerate (Onami, Tango). 

291. Conglomerate (Yamanoi, Nagato). 

292. Conglomerate (Todai, Shinano). 

293. Trigonia Sandstone (Kurokawachi, Shinano), 

294. Sandstone (Minato, Awaji). 

295. Sandstone (Minato, Aawji). 
2c/>. Sandy Shale (Miiira, lyo). 

297. Siliceous Limestone with Foraminifera (Sctoiioya, Siiruga). 



///. (Saxnozolc, 

I. Pertiarv'. 

298. Marly Limestone (Isomura, Awa, Honshu). 

29(). Limestone (Fukaya, Noto)^. 

300. Calcareous Sandstone ( Xanatsugama, Hizen) 

301. Conglomerate (lida, Musashi). 
301. Sandstone (Itsukaichi, Musashi). 

303. Sandstone (Miike, Chikugo). 

304. Sandstone (Shibuya, Etchu). 



40 Japanese Exhibition, 

305. Shell Conglomerate (Morai, Ishikari). 

306. Shale with Fossil Shells (Yiimoto', Iwaki). 

307. Calcareous Tuff (Kaisuka, Awa, Honshu). 

308. Tuff Breccia (Iwatsu, Tajima), 

309. Tuff ( Yumoto, Sagami). 

310. Tuff (Uraga, Sagami). 

2. QUARTERNARY, 

311. Loam (Shibuya, Musashi). 

312. Sand (Shibuya, Musashi). 

313. Gravel (Shibuya, Musashi). 

C. Eruptive Rocks. 

/. Pal(Vo-Eriipiivc Rocks. 

314. Granite (Oda, Hitachi). 

315. Granitite (Sumoto, Awaji). 

316. Hornblende-granitite (Ashio, Shimotsuke). 

317. Hornblende-granitite (Kanayama, Tango). 

318. Hornblende-granitite (Kurita, Tango). 

319. Porphyritic Granitite (Kurita, Tango). 

320. Porphyritic Granitite (Kamigori, Hitachi). 

321. Granite with yVllanite (Jodojimachi, Yamashiro). 

322. Aplite (Maezawa, Kai). 

^2Tt. Graphic Granite (Ishikawayama, Iwaki). 

324. Corsite ( Shiroshi, Iwaki). 

325. Mica-diorite (Yunotake, Iwaki). 

326. Ouartz-diorite (Ishigoyama, Awa, Honshu). 

327. Gabbro-diorite ( Mineokayama, Awa, Honshu). ! 

328. Gabbro (]\lineokayama, Awa, Honshu). 

329. Xorite (Shioda, Awaji). 

330. Peridotite (Saimaru, Hitachi). 

331. Peridotite (Ono, Higo). 

332. Peridotite (Machiya, Hitachi). 

333. Peridotite (Machiya, Hitachi). *' ^ 
33^. Peridotite (Machiya, Hitachi). j 

335. Ophicalcite (Kanasalii, Musashi). 

336. Ophicalcite (Kurokochi, Shinano). 

337. Quartz-porphyry (Kukuno, Hida). 

338. Ihnnblende-porphyrite (Yunotake, Iwaki). 

339. Diabase (Maue, Musashi). 

340. Augite-porphyrite (Kebaraichi. Rikuchu). 



IXTERXATIONAL EXPOSITION, ST. LoUIS, I904. 4I 

341. Angite-porphyrite (Kanazawa, Rikuchu). 

342. Augite-porphyrite ( Misaka Kai). 

343. Augite-porphyrite ( Hozugawa, Tamba). 

344. Foiirchite (Hozugawa. Tamba). 

//. Nco-Eruptivc Rocks, 

345. Liparite (Shirane, Shimotsuke). 

346. Liparite (Ashio» Shimotsuke). 

347. Rhyohte (Otagiri, Shinano). 

348. PieJmoiitite-rhyoHte (Karuizawashinden, Shinano). 

349. Perlite ( Kurogamjyama, Hizen). 

350. Perlite (Horaijiyama, Mikawa). 

351. Pumice (Toshima, Izu). 

352. Trachyte (Tsuruha, Sanuki). 
333. Dacitc (Kumas^aka, Izu). 

354. Mica-anclesite (Vurayama, Sanuki). • 

355. Mica-andesite with Ciamet (Anamushi, Yamato). 

356. Hornblende-andesite, Haruna Lava (Ikaho, Kozuke). 

357. Homblcnde-andesite, Haruna Lava (Hanmafuji, Kozuke). 

358. Hornblende-andesite, Shirane Lava (Shirane, Shimotsuke). 

359. Hornblende-andesite (Hidake, Higo). 
36c. Honiblende (Aonoyama, Iwami). 

361. Hornblende-andesite, Hakusan Lava (Hakusan. Kaga'). 

362. Andesite-Obsidian ( Ikadaba, Izu). 

363. (Obsidian (Wadatoge, Shinano). 

364. Sph'jrnlitic Obsidian ( Yugashima, Izu). 

365. Propylitc (Ikuno, Tajima). 
3(')(). F^ropylite (Yugashima, Izu). 
367. Propylitc ( Yaguradake, Sagami). 

3(38. r*yro.\enc-ande<ite, Iwaka Lava (Iwakisan, Mutsu). 

^6i). Twn-i)yroxcnc-andesite (Kanehira, Mutsu). 

370. Two-pyroxene-andesite. Chokai Lava (Chokaisan, Uzen). 

371. ( >livine-pyro\one-andesite, Iwate Lava (Ivvatesan. Riku- 

chu ) . 

372. Two-pyroxctio-andesite, .Zao Lava (Zaosan, Rikuzen). 
37.V Two-pyroxonc-andcsite, Handai Lava (Bandaisan, Iwa- 

<hiro). 

374. ( Hivine-]nn;\ene-andcsite, Xasu Lava ( Xasusan, Shimo- 
tsuke). 

T^/^. Augitc-andcsite, Asama Lava ( Asamayama, Shinano). 

^7^). C'ordicrite-bearing Ejecta, Rhyolite (Asamayama, Shinano") . 



1 



42 Japanese Exhiiutiox, 

377- Py^o^^"^"^"^^^*-^^^' Xantaisan Lava (Chuzenji. .Shimo- 

tsuke). 

3/8. Pvroxene-andesite, Yatsugatake Lava (Uchiai. Shiiianu). 

379- Pyroxene-andesite (Komekami, Sagami). 

380. Two-pyroxene-andesite (Tonosawa, Sagami). 

381. Pyroxene-andesite, Amagi Lava (Jizodo, Izu). 

382. Pyroxene-andesite (Togi. Noto). 

383. Mica-pyroxene-andesite, Dlaisen Lava (Daisen. Hoki), 

384. Pyroxene-andesite, Aso Lava (Tochiki, Higo). 

385. Pyroxene-andesite, Aso Lava (Aso-Nakadake, Higo). 

386. Pyroxene-andesite (Kagoshima, Satsuma). 

387. Pyroxene-andesite, Otake Lava (Sakurajima, Satsuma). 

388. Sanukite (Kokubu, Sanuki). 

389. Enstatite-andesite (Choshi, Shimosa). 

390. Boninite (Ogasawarajima. Bonin Islands). 

391. Plagiocla§e-basalt, Fuji Lava (Fujisan, Suruga). 

392. Bomb (Fujisan, Suruga). 

393- .Ropy Lava (Tainaikuguri, Kai). 

394. Phanerocrystalline Bomb, cover.ed witli r>lack Lava ( Fuji- 

san, Suruga). 

395. Basalt (Gembudo, Tajima). 

396. Basalt (Wadatoge, Shin^no). 

397. Basalt (Omurosan, Izu). 
398a. Basalt (Daikonjima. Jzumo). 
3c)8b. Basalt (Ogusoyama, Iwami). 

3. F0SSTL.S. 

The following are some of the characteristic fossils hitherto found 
in Japan, and represent the Japanese types of fossils emlxfdded in the 
strata, ranging from the Carboniferous to the Tertiary. They are 
arranged according to their geological ages with their corresponding 
localities : 

/. Palrroz'oic. 



399 
400 

40T 

402 

403 

404 



Carboniferous. 

F^usulina japonica Gumb. (Akasaka, Mipo). 
Schwagerina \'erbceki Gcinitz (Akasaka, Minoj. 
Lonsdaleia Akasakaensis Yabc (Akasaka, Mino). 
Lithostrotion sp. (Tsukitatc, Rikuzen). 
Campophyllum sp. (Sennin, Rikuzen). 
Productus sp. (Setamai, Rikuzen). 



International Exposition, St. Loins, 1904. ' 43 

405. Belierophon sp. (Akasaica, Mtno). 

406a. Chemnitzia sp. (Akasaka, Mino). 

406b. Murchisonia sp. (Akasaka, Mino). 

407. Trilobite (Phillipsia sp.) (Arisu, Rikuzen ). 

//. Mesosok, 

1. Triassic. 

408. Pseudomonotis ochotica (Keyscrl.) Teller (Xarivva, Bitchu). 

409. I>aonella Kotoi E. v. Mcjs. ( Sakavva, Tosa). 

410. Ceratites sakawanus E. r. Mqjs. (Sakawa, Tosa). 

411. Arpadites (Anorcites) (jottschei E. v. Mojs (Inai, Riku- 

zen). 

412. Dictyophyllum japonicum Yok. (Yanianoi, Xagato). 

413. Jiaiera cf. paucipartela Nath. ( Yamanoi, Xagato). 
414^ Asplenium Rosserti Presl. (Yamanoi, Nagato). 

2. Jurassic. 

415. Cyclolitcs sp. (Higashinagano, Xagato). 

416. Trigonia V-costata Lye. (Hosoura, Rikuchuj. 

417. Harpoceras sp. (Xishi-nakayama, Nagato). 

418. Perisphinctes sp. ( Xagano, Echizen). 

419. Onychiopsis elongata Geyl, (Yanagidani, Kaga). 

420. Asplenium argutulum Hr. (Shima, Kaga). 

421. Nilssonia nipponensis Yok. (C)kamigo, Hida ). ' 

422. Podozamites Reinii Geyl. (Okamigo, Hida). 

423. Gingko digitata Brgt. (Okamigo, Hida). . 

424. Gingkodium X^athorsti Yok. (Shima, Kaga). 

425. Pecopteris exilis Phill. (Shima, Kaga). 

426. Dioonites Kotoei Yok. (Tani, Echizen). 
427a. .\splenium whitbiense Brgt. (Ozo, Kaga). 
427b. Nilssonia ozoana ;>'o^. (Ozo, Kaga). 
427c. Taneiopteris sp. (Ozo, Kaga). 



428 
420 

430 
431 
432 

433 
434 
435 



3. Cretaceous. 

Thamnastraea sp. (Shiraishi, Tosa). 
I'ygurus asiaticus Yosh. (Torinosu, Tosa). 
.\vicula Hara<lae Yok. (Kagahara, Kozuke). 
Trigonia pocilliformis Yok. (Kagahara, Kozuke). 
Trigonia pocilliformis Yok. (Tanono, Awa, Shikoku ) 
Nerinea cf. Visurgis Romer (Sakawa, Tosa ). 
Desmoceras Damesi Jimbo (Abeshinai, Teshio). 
Puzosia planulatiforme Jimbo (Abeshinai; Teshio). 



1 



44 Jap.vnese Exhibition. 

436. Pachydiscus Haradai Jimbo (Abeshinai. Teshio). 

437. Pachydiscus sp (Kagahara, Kozuke). 

438. Tetra,s:onites sphareonotus Jimbo (Yuhartgawa^ I shikari). 
439a. (iaiidryceras limatum Vabc (Abeshinai, Teshio). 

439b. Scaphites puerculus Jimbo (Abeshinai, Ttshio). 

440. Anisoccras Haradanum Voh. (Abeshinai, Teshio). 

441. Anisoceras sp. (aff. A. indicum Forb.) (Kagahara, Kozuke) 

442. Hamites yubarensis Vabc (Yubari, Ishikari). 

443. Inoceramus Xaumanni Vok. (Urakawa, Hidaka). 

444. Pecoptcris Geyleriana Xatli (Sakawa, Tosa). 

445. Zamiuphyllum BucKianiim /://. (Sakawa, Tosa). 

///. Cainozoic. 

1. Tertiary. 

446. \iimmulite javanus Verbeck (Ogasawarajima, Bonin Is- 

lands). 

447. Schizaster niimmuliticits Yosh (Ogasawarajima, Ronin Is- 

lands). 

448. Linthia nipponica Yosh. (Miyata, Hitachi ). 

449. Dendrophyllia sp. (Kushimoto, Kii). 

450. IVntacrinus Stem. (Kushimoto, Kii). 

451. Rhynchonella psittacea Gmcl, (Miyata, Hitachi). 

452. Pecten laetus Gould (Ose, Hitachi). 

453. Mytilas grayanus Dunk ( Xippaomanai, Hidaka). 

454. Panoj)aca generosa Gould (loki, Tosa). 

455. Conchocele disjuncta Gabb. (Morai, Ishikari). 

456. Gavagella sp. ( Tonohama, Tosa). 

457. VMcafya callosa Martens (Tsukiyoshi, Mino). 

458. Brachyura sp. ( Suenomatsuyama, Mutsu). 
450. (Jxyrhina sp. (Shimoda, Izu). 

460. Leuciscus n. sp. (Yawataura, Iki). 

j6i. Lithothamnium sp. (Ogasawarajima. f>onin Islands). 

462. Myriophyllum n. sp. (Shiobara. Kozuke). 

463. Carpiniphyllum pyramidale Gop. sp. japonicum Xatlt. 

{ Asano, Shinano). 

464. Trapa n. sp. (Ogoya, Kaga). 

465. Acer palmatum T/i. (Shiobara, Shimotsuke). 

Specimkns of I/ARGB Sizs. 

466. SubcarlKHiiferous Fossils in Limestone (Akasaka.-Mina). 

467. ne]lcro|)h(m sp. ( Akasaka^MinoV 



International Exposition. St. Louis, 1904. 45 

468. Pleurotomaria sp; (Akasaka, Mino). 

469. Gymnites Watanabei II. v. Mojs. (Inai, Rikuzeii). 

470. Aipadites (Clinites) Xaumanni E. v. Mojs ( Inai, Rikuzen). 

47 T. Dioonites Kotoei Vok. i ,c-,, j^ ^ 
. ., < (bhima, Kaga). 

Anomozamites sp. (^ 

472. Ginfjkodium Nathorsti Vok. (Shima, Kaga). 

473. Pachydiscus Naumanni Yok. (LVakawa, Hidaka). 
474a. Zamiophyllutn Buchianum Etf. sp. (Ryoseki, Tofsa). 
474b. Nilssonia pterophylloides Yok, (Ryoseki, Tosa). 
474c. Chladophlebis Nathorsti Yok (Ryoseki, Tosa). ' 

475. Conchocele disjuncta Gahb, (Iruma, Iwashiro). 

476. Cyprina sp. (Kosaji, Omi). 

477. Stegodon clifti Faic. & Caiu (Shodo, Sanuki ). 

478. Elephas primigenius i^/wm. (Hishiike, Mikawa ). 
479; Sus japonicus Yosh. (Ryuge, l^go). 

4. Whktstonks, Porcelain Clays and PhosphAtks. ' 

(a) whetstones. 

The chief whetstones now in common use in Japan are collected 
and exhibited here. The collection comprises several kinds ol whet- 
stones of various textures and of different characters, l)eing of sedi- 
mentary or eruptive origin. Among them, those of liparites and their 
tuffs; for instance, those like the Xagura-do, Jokenjido, etc., are rather 
remarkable, and are considered to fit for exportation to foreign coun- 
tries. 

480. Adinole Slate, Narutakido (Umegahata, Yamashiro). 

481. Adinole Slate, Otsukido (Umegahata, Yamashiro). 

482. Striped Adinole Slate, Inoshirodo (I'megah^ta. Yama- 

shiro). 

483. Adinole Slate, Kaburikodo (Umegahata, Yamashiro). 

484. Adinole Slate, Kizuyaniado (Udano, Yamashiro). 

485. Adinole Slate, Shobudo (Umegahata, Yamashiro). 

486. Admole Slate, Okudono-Suitado (Umegahata, Yamashiro). 

487. Gay* Slate.- Yagi-Izarido (Yagi, Tamba). 

488. Adinole Slate, Okudonodo (Umegahata, Yamashiro). 

489. Adinole Slate, Yagi-X'agaodo (Yagi, Tamba). 

490. Clay Slate, Ouchido (Ouchi, Tamba). 

491. Metamorphosed Clay Slate, Sukegawado ( Sukej;awa, 
' Hitachi). 

492. Clay Slate, Uchiglimorido (Saga, Yamashiro). 



40 



Japanese Exhjiutiox, 



403. Clay Slate, Aoto (Ivozaki, Tamba). 

494. Mottled Slate, Ashiyado (Ouchi, Taraba). 

495. Liparitc Tuff, Yellow Nagurado (Onomiira, Mikawa). 

496. Liparite Tuff, White Nagurado (Onomura, Mikawa). 

497. Finely Spotted Slate, Yagi-Matsumotodo (Yagi, Tamba). 

498. Metamorphosed Clay Slate, Mearado (Ouchi, Tamba). 

499. Metamorphosed Clay Slate, Akado (Igura, Tamba). 

500. Mettamorphosed Slate, Akado (Igura, Tamba). 

501. Spotted Slate, Akado (Nishinaka, Hitachi). 

502. Metamorphosed Slate, Kasagido (Kiya, Yamashiro). 

503. Spcntcd Slate, Aoto (Kozaki, Tamba). 

504. Spotted Sandy Slate, Mitanido (Mitani, Shimotsuke), 

505. Metamorphosed Spotted Slate, Medoshido (Kozaki, 

Tamba). 

506. Metamorphosed Spotted Slate, Saekido (Igura, Tamba). 

507. Spotted Slate, Monzendo (Naka, Yamashiro). 

508. Rhyolite, lyodo (Toyama, lyo). 

509. Rhyolite, lyodo (Karakawa, lyo). 

510. Rhyolite, Aka-Amakusado (Oyano, Higo). 

511. Rhyoiitc. Kozuke-Torado (Tozawa, Kozuke). 

512. Liparite, Yukawado (Yukawa, Kii). 

513. Liparite, lyodo (Karakawa, lyo). > 

514. Liparite, Shiro-Amakusado (Oyano, Higo). 

515. Liparite, lyodo (Toyama, lyo). 

516. Liparite. lyodo (Toyoma, lyo). 

517. Dacite. Shirodo (Aizu, Iwashiro). 

518. Lii)Hrite, Kozuke-Shirodo (Tosawa, Kozuke). 

519. Dacite. Kozukedo (Tosawa, Kosuke). 

520. Ahdesite, Kazama-Nagurado (Kazama, Uzen). 

521. Andesite, Tajimado (Moroyose, Tajima). 

522. Homblende-andesite, White Jokenjido (Jichu, Echizen). 

523. Homblende-andesite, Jokenjido (Jichu, Echizen). 

524. Fine-grained Sandstone, Hon-Omurado (Irino, Iwashiro). 

525. Fine-grained Sandstone, Tosado (Shishikuiura,. Awa, Shi- 

koku). 

526. Fine-grained Sandstone, Omurado (Katada, Kii). 

527. Banded Sandstone, Chamikodo (Katada, Kii). 

528. Fine-grained Sandstone, Hibido (Matsushima, Hizai). 

529. Fine-grained Sandstone, Choshido (Choshi, Shimosa). 

530. Fine-grained Sandstone, Choshido (Qioshi, Shimosa). 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 47 

531. Fine-jrrained Sandstone, Shiro-Matsudo (Tsuzurabuchi, 

Kii). 

532. Fine-grained Sandstone, Gotodo (Hirashinia> Hizen). 

533. Medium-grained Sandstone, Hirashimado (Hirashima, 

Hizen). 

534. Medium-grained Sandstone, Sasaguchido (Kosasa, Hizen). 

535. Medium-grained Sandstone, Matsushimado (Matsushima, 

Hizen). 

536. Meditun-grained Siliceous Sandstone, Tshigayado (Katada, 

Kii). .. . 

337. Medium-grained Siliceous Sandstone, Jojirodo (Saino, 
Kii). 

538. Medium-grained Siliceous Sandstone, Shiro-Eguchido 

(Eguchi, Hizen). 

(n) PORCELAIN CLAYS, ETC. 

This is a collection of specimens of raw and prepared materials 
for the bodies of the chief porcelains and stone-wares of Japan. The 
result of the analysis of each material is given, in most cases, on the 
label accompanying it, and the proportions of materials, employed in 
the mixture for the liisque, are respectively noticed under its proper 
head. ' 

1, Materials for the Uody of Arita Porcelain (Arita-yaki). 

539. Decomposed Liparite, Izumiyama-ishi (Arita, Hizen). 

540. I)ecomi)osed Liparite, Amakusa-ishi (Amakusa, Higo). 

542. Klutriated Paste for the Bisque, 

. { 4 vols, of Izumiyama-ishi. 
consisting of < , . . / ... 

[ 1 vol. of Amakusa-ishi. 

2. ^Materials for the body of Kyoto Porcelain ( Kiyomizu-y aki j . 

543. l>ci)mi>()sed Liparite, Ta)<ahama-ishi (Amakusa, Higo). 

544. IHilverized and Washed, Takahama-ishi (Amakusa, Higo). 
545.' Decomi^ised Granite, Tokiguchi-Gairome (Tokiguchi, 

Mine). 

546. Pulverized and Washed, Tokiguchi-Gairome (Tokiguchi, 

Mino). 

547. Decomposed Granite, Takao-Gairome (Takao, Yaraashiroj. 

548. Pulverized and Washed, Takao-Gairome (Takao, Yama- 

shiro). 
549- Quartz. Sanuki-Keiseki (Hiroshima, Sanuki). 
550. Feldspar, Choseki (Mikumo, (.)mi). 



consisting of 



i 



48 Japanese Exhibition, 

551. Pulverized and Washed, Choseki (Mikumo. Omi). 

552. Re-deposited Clay from Decomposed Granite. Shij^araki- 

zuchi (Kinose, Omi). 
533- Pulverized and Washed, Shigaraki-zuchi (Kinose. Omi). 
554. Elutriated Paste for the P>isque, 

7 parts of Takahama-ishi. 
I part of Tokiguchi-^cfairome. 
(in weight) ^1 1 part of Choseki. 

1 I part of Keiseki. 

3. Materials for the Body of Awada Stone-ware ( Awada-yaki ) . 

555- Agalmatolite, Roseki (Mitsuishi, Bizen). 

556. Pulverized and Washed. Roseki (Mitsuishi, IJizen). 

557. Decomposed Quartz-porphyry, Rokujizo-Mazetsuchi (Ro- 

kujizo, Omi). 

558. Pulverized and Washed. Rokujizo-Mazetsuchi (Rokujizo- 

Omi). 

559. Clay from Decomposed (iranite, Shigaraki-zuchi (Kinose, 

Omi). 

560. Kaolui,' l^^ifoe-zuchi (Shimoda. Omi). 

561. Clay from Decomposed Granite, Nendo ( Shinohara, Omi). 

< < > 

562. Pulverized and Washed, Xendo (Shinohara. Omi). 

563. Decomposed Aplite, Yada-Mazetsuchi ( Vada, Yamato). 

564. Pulverized and Washed, Yada-Mazetsuchi ( Yada, Yamato). 

565. Carbonaceous Clay, Imayama-Kibushi (Imayama, Yama- 

shiro). 

566. Pulverized. Imayama-Kibushi ( Imayama. Yamashiro). 

567. Slightly Carbonaceous Clay, Asamiya-Kibushi (Asamiya, 

Omi). 

568. Pulverized and Washed, Asamiya-Kibu.shi ( Asamiya, C ♦mi). 

569. Elutriated Paste for the Bisque. 

i JO vols, of Roseki. 
consisting of < 10 vols, of Mazetsuchi. 

(15 vols, oi Shigarakizuchi. 

4. Materials for the Body of Satuma Stone-ware ( Satsuma-yaki). 

570. l>ecomposed Andesite, Kaolin, Kirishima-tsuchi ( Kirishima- 

yama, Osumi). 
571,. Decomposed Andesite, Bara-tsuchi ( Higashikata. Satsuma). 

572. Siliceous TuflF, Kaseda-zuna (Kaseda, Satsuma). 

573. Elutriated Paste for the Bis(|ue. 

3 vols, of Kirishima-tsuclii. 

consisting of ^ 18 vols, of Bara-tsuchi. 

13 vols, of Kascda-zuna. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 49 

5. Materials for the Body of Awaji Stone-ware (Awaji-yaki). 

574. Re-deposited Clay from Decomposed Granite, Ono-tsuchi 

(Ono, Awaji). 

575. Elutriated Paste for the Bisque, consisting of Ono-tsuchi. 

6. Materials for the Body of Kaga Porcelain (Kutani-yaki), 

576. Decomposed Liparite, Hanasaka-tsuchi (Hanasaka, Kaga). 

577. Washed, Hanasaka-tsuchi (Hanasaka, Kaga). 

578. Decomposed Liparite, Gokokuji-tsuchi (Gokokuji, Kaga). 

579. Washed Gokokuji-tsuchi (Gokokuji, Kaga). 

580. Decomposed Liparite, Nabetani-ishi (Nabetani, Kaga). 

581. Washed Nabetani-ishi (Nabetani, Kaga). 

582. Elutriated Paste for the Bisque, 

5 vols, of Hanasaka-tsuchi. 

consisting of -^ 5 vols, of Gokokuji-tsuchi. 

3 vols, of Nabetani-ishi. 

7. Materials for the Body of Aizu Porcelain (Aizu-yaki). 

583. Decomposed Liparite, Okubo-ishi (Hongo, Iwashiro). 

584. Pulverized Okubo-ishi (Hongo, Iwashiro). 

585. Decomposed Liparite, Kabuto-ishi (Oki, Iwashiro). 
586; Pulverized Kabuto-ishi (Oki, Iwashiro). 

587. Decomposed Liparite, Jari-ishi (Hongo, Iwashiro). 

588. Pulverized Jari-ishi (Hongo, Iwashiro). 

589. Elutriated Paste for the Bisque, 

3 vols, of Okubo-ishi. 

consisting of -{ 3 vols, of Jari-ishi. 

2 vols, of Kabuto-ishi. 

8. Materials for the Body of Seto Porcelain (Seto-yaki). 

590. Decomposed Granite, Gairome (Yamaguchi, Owari). 



591 
592 

593 

594 

595 
596 



Pulverized and Washed Gairome (Yamaguchi, Owari). 

Feldspar, Choseki (Takaoka, Mikawa). 

Washed Choseki (Takaoka, Mikawa). 

Quartz mixed with Feldspar, Keiseki (Sarunage, Mikawa). 

Pulverized Keiseki (Sarunage, Mikawa). 

Elutriated Paste for the Bisque, 

10 vols, of Gairome. 
consisting of ^ 5 vols, of Choseki. 

2 vols, of Keiseki. 



1 



so Japanese Exhibition, 

9. Materials for the Body of Tajlmi Porcelain (Tajimi-yaki). * 

. .597. Decomposed Granite, Tokiguchi-Gairome (Tokiguchi, 

Mino). 
.,5^. Washed Tokiguchi-Gairome (Tokigiichi, Mino). 

599. Feldspar, Choseki (Ohira, Mikawa). 

600. Washed Choseki (Ohira, Mikawa). 
. ^i. . Quartz, Keiseki (Tsumagi, Mino). 

602. Washed Keiseki (Tsumagi, Mino). 
^ , 693. Ehttriatcd Paste for the Iiisqne, 

2 vols, of Gairofne. 
consisting of -^ 3 vols, of Choseki. 

5 vols, of Keiseki. ' . 

(C) PHOSPHATES. 

Of late;, phosphates have.eOme to be known to occur in many places 
in Japan. The specimens here exhibited are principal types of them, 
and they represent various forms of phosphates hitherto found in 
Japan. ' Percentage of P? O^ contained in each specimen is described 
on the label attached to it. 

604. Nodule Phosphate (IJrakawa, Plidaka). 

605. Nodule Phosphate (Yamamoto. Mutsu). 

606. Nodule Phosphate (Xiageba^ ^gt>)- 

607. Nodule Phosi)hatc (Sochi, Echigo). 

608. Nodule Phosphate (Sodii, Echigo). 

609. Nodule Phosphate ( Xakaiiosako, Hyuga). 

610. Rock Phosphate (Sakegawa, Uzen). 

611. Rock Phosphate (Arayama, Shinano). 

612. Rpck Phosphate (Toba, Shima). . 

613. Soft Phosphate (Hiuchidani, Noto). 
6t4. 'Soft Phosphate (Kita-niikasato, Hitachi). 

6f5. * (juano Phosphate (\Iinami-Torishima, Marcus Island). 

616. Guano Phosphate (Minami-Torishima, Marcus Island). 

617. Guano Phosphate (Minami-Torishima, Marcus Island). 

5.' Crude Pktrolkum. 

Of Japanese crude petroleum, there are many varieties, belonging 
to the naphtha series, and found in Tertiary strata. The specimens 
here exhibited are tH'pes collected from the principal oil fields in the 



i 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 51 

Empire. The results of fractional distillation af^ respectively shown 
on the accompanying labels. 

618. Crude Petroleum (Izumi, Ugo). 

619. Crude Petroleum (Oguni, l.go). 

620. Crude Petroleum (Xiitsu, Echigo). 

621. Crude Petroleum (Amaze, Ecfiigo). 

622. Crude Petroleum (Nagamine, Rchigo). 

623. Crude Petroleum (Ahuraden, Kchigo). 

624. Crude Petroleum (Miyagawa, Echigo). 

625. Crude Petroleum ( Katsuhozawa, Kchigo). 

626. Crude Petroleum (Hire, Kchigo).- 

627. Crude Petroleum (Urazc, Kchigo). 

628. Crude Petroleum (Takezawa, Kchigo). 

629. Crude Petroleum (Ojiya, Kchigo). 

630. Crude Petroleum ( Hara, Kchigo). 

631. Crude Petroleum (Hiyama, l^xhigo). 

632. Crude Petroleum (Sagara, Totomi). 

6. Soils. . - 

The specimens of soils with the i)nKlucts of their mechanical 
analyses, here exhibited, include most of the important ones con3ti- 
tuting the arable land of Japan. They are arranged accordii>g to their 
localities, as follows : 

633. Clay, Young Quaternary (Ima, Bizen). 

634. Humus Clay, Volcanic Detritus (Kawadai, Uzen). 

635. Humus Clay, Old Quaternary (Sakai, Musashi).. 

636. Loamy Clay, Young Quaternary (Xagaoka, Echigo). 

637. Schottery Clay, Chlorite-schist (Yamashirodani, Awa, Shi- 

koicu). 

638. Loam, Tertiary Tuff (KakegaWa, Totomi). 

639. Loam, Old Quaternary (Tokachi, Hokkaido). 

640. Sandy Loam, Lapilli (Ciotemha, Sttruga). 

641. Schottery Loam, Palaeozoic Pyrbxcnitc ( Yamadahara, 

Kii). 

642. Schottery Lodm, Palaeozoic Slate (Uji, Yamashiro). 

643. Schottery Loam, Mesozoic Shale (Amaknsa, Higo). 

644. Loamy Sand, Granite (Ogyu, Mikawa). 

645. Loamy Sand, Granite Cineiss (Nihommatsu, Iwashiro). 

646. Loamy Sand, Young Quaternary (KuHhashi, Musashi). 

647. Loamy Schotter, Mesozoic Sandstone (Ono, Tosa). 



1 



52 Japanese Exhibition, 

19. Page 25s, column 2, line 37, for Numatzuta, read Namazuia, 

20. Page 256. column 1, line 16, strike out mine. 

21. Ibid, line 36, for andestite, read andcsitc. 

22. Ibid, column 2, line 11, for abdesite, read andcsitc. 

23. Ibid, line 9, before Argentiferous, add Brecciated andcsitc with, 

24. Ibid, line 14, for Argentine, read Argentite. 

25. Ibid, lines 24, 26, 28, 29, for Sump, read Lump, 

26. Page 257, column i, after line 4, insert Iridosnin, 

27. Ibid, strike out lines 10 and 11. 

28. Ibid, line 36, for Iridosmin Stibnite, read Stibnite, 

29. Ibid, column 2, line 2, for Liporitc, read Liparite, 

GROUP n7» 

1. Page 257, column 2, after line 31, insert 2a, Fujita & Co. 

2. Page 258, column i, line 4, for silver ivork, read silver mine. 

3. Ibid, strike out lines 7, 8 and 9. 

4. Ibid, column 2, line 36, for Rock drill in execution, read Layer 

rock drill in execution, Ashio Copper Mine, 

5. Ibid, line 37, strike out Ashio Copper Mine. 

6. Ibid, after line 21, insert: 

7a. Imperial Steel Works — photograph. 
7b. Imperial Geological Survey, Tokyo — 

Reconnaissance topographical and geological maps 
(scale 1 1400,000) : 

Division I. 
Division II. 
Division III. 
Division IV. 
Division V. 

Special topographical and geological maps (scale i :200,- 
000) : 

Section Kamaishi. 
Section Akita. 
Section Hon jo. 
Section Sakata. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 53 

Section Fukushima. 
Section Fukui. 
Section Miyazu. 
Section Hieizan, 
Section Osaka. 
Section Wakayama. 
Section Ikuno. 
Section Tokiishima. 
Section Oki. 
Section Okayama. 
Section Marugame. 
Section Kochi. 
Section Uwajima. 
Section Oita. 
Section Miyazaki. 
Section Fukuoka. 
Section Saga. 
Section Kumamoto. 
Section Kagoshima. 
Section Koshikijima. 

Topographical map of the Japanese Empire (scale 1:1,- 
000,000). 

Geological map of the Japanese Empire (scale 1:1,- 

000,000). 
General map showing orography of the Japanese Empire 
and depths of the surrounding ocean bottoms (scale 
1 12,500,000) . 
Agronomical maps (scale 1:100,000; in Japanese and 
English) : 

Musashi province (northern part). 

Sagami province and the southern part of Musashi 

province. 
Owari and Mikawa provinces. 
Kawachi and Izumi provinces, and the eastern part of 
Settsu province. 
General agronomical map of the Japanese Empire (scale 
1:500,000; in Japanese and English) in two parts, 
with the table showing distribution of the cultivable 
and cultivated lands. 
General map of known oil and gas field of the Japanese 
Empire (scale 1:000,000). 



1 



54 :'•'•' Japanese ExHiaiTioN, 

Geological and topographical maps of the oil field of 
Japan (scale i :20,ooo; in Japanese and English) : 
Section I, Higashiyatna oil field, Echigo (with pro- 
files). 
Section II, The southern part of Minami-Akitagori, 

Ugo (with profiles). 
Section III,, Nishiyama oil field, Echigo (with pro- 
files, detailed niaps, etc.). 
Reliefs of the Volcano Bandai, before and after its erup- 
tion of 1886 (horizontal scale i :50,ooo; vertical scaje 
1:25,000), with the reference map (scale 1:50,000). 

7. Ibid, after line 26, insert Photographs. 

, 8. Ibid, line 28, for rit, read pit, 

(), Page 260, column i, lines 4, 6 and 8, for Geographical, read 
Geological, 

GROUP 118. 

1. Page 260, column i, line 27, strike out ingot. 

2. Page 260, column 2, strike out line 19. 

-3.' IfnAf line 32, for Purokura copper mine, read Furukazva copper 
ivorks, 

■ 4. Ibid, lines 34 and 35, for Fnrokura copper ;;n«(?/read Furukawa 
copper works. 

5. Ibid, strike out line 36. 

6. Ibid, line 39, for mille, read mill, 
7- Piige 26iy column i,.line i, for electroty pic, read electrolytic. 

8. Ibid, after line 4, insert : 
B. W. G. 3-^ electrolytic wire. 

' ' ' B. W. G. 2 — o electrolytic wire. 
B. W. G. I — o electrolytic wire. 

9. Paee 262, column i,.line 11, for Ammoniuni, read Aluminium. 

10. ibid, lines 14-17, for Irihoku, read Irobaku. 

. • ■ ' 

vi. llMd; Tme 40, for Gold thread, Jj, read Gold thread, D No. jj. 

y^. Ibid, line 41, for Gold thread, if, read Gold thread, D No. 14. 

13. Ibid, line 42, for Gold thread; /^, teadGold thread, D No, 16. 

14,: Ibid, column 2, line 3, for Gold thread,- r^, rczd Gold thread, E 
No. 12. 



'J. 



1 

J 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 55 

15. Ibid, line 4, for Gold thread, /j, read Gold thread, E No. /j. 

16. Page 263, column i, line 7, for argciitifctoiis ingot, read argen- 

tiferous copper ingot. - 1 

17. Ibid, lines i6 and 17, strike out and silt'cr of. 

GROUP U9. . 

Page 263, after line 19, insert: 

Explanator>' text to the special geological map of : 

Section Kamaishi (in Japanese). 

Section Akita (in Japanese). 

Section Hon jo (in Japanese). 

Section Sakata (in Japanese). 

Section Fukushimn (in Japani^se). 

Section Fukuji (in Japanese). 

Section Miyazu (in Japanese). 

Section Hieizan (in Japanese); ' 

Section Osaka (in Japanese). ' 

Section Wakayama (in Japanese). 

Section Ikuno (in Japan^se)^ ;• <» 'A*?Tfi 

Section Tokiishima (m Japanese). 

Section Oki (in Japanese). 

Section Okayama (in Japanese). 

Section Marugame (in Japanese). -^ ^' 

Section Kochi (in Japanese). •'*'' 

Section Uwajima (in Japanese). 

Section Oita (in Japanese). 

Section Miyazaki (in Japanese). 

Section Fukuoka (in Japanese). 

Section Saga (in Japanese). 

Section Kumamoto (in Japanese). 

Section Kagoshima (in Japanese). 

Section Koshikijima (in Japanese). * ' 

Explanatory text to the agronomical map of the : 

Musashi province, nortbem patt (in Japanese).' « 
Sagami province and th,e southern part ofMvsashi 

province (in Japanese). 
Owari and Mikawa provinces (in Japanese)./ 
Kawachi and Iziimi provinces, and the eastern part of 

Settsu province fin Japanese). • -» 



56 Japanese Exhibition, 

Explanatory text to the geological and topographical 

map of the oil field of Japan : 
Section I, Higashiyama oil field, Echigo (in Japanese). 
Section II, The southern part of Minami-Akitagori, 

Ugo (in Japanese). 

Bulletins of the Imperial Geological Survey of Japan, 
Vols. IX-XVI (in Japanese). 

Report on the geology of Ikuno Mine, with maps (in 
Japanese). 

Outlines of the geology of Japan (descriptive text to 
accompany the geological map of the Japanese Em- 
pire on the scale i : 1,000,000). 

Beitrage zur Kenntniss der japanischen Landwirth- 
schaft, Von Prof. Dr. M. Fesca. 
I. AUgemeiner Theil. 
11. Specieller Theil. 

Photographic portraits of the personnel of the Imperial 
Geological Survey of Japan. 

DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND GAME. 

GROUP 121. 

1. Page 273, column i, lines 16-18, read Furs of ermiru^s. 

2. Ibid, lines 24-30, read Furs of sea otter, seal and dyed furs of 

same: furs of hair -seal, ermine, yellonf ermine, red fox, white 
fox, badger, otter, and dyed fur of the same; v^i^sel furs, 
natural and dyed. 

GROUP 122. 

3. Ibid, cohimn 2, line 16, read Mackerel. 

4. Ibid, strike, out line 17, 

5. Ibid, after line "19, insert Chi-dai. 

6. Ibid, line 21, read Crabs, stuffed, 

7. Ibid, strike out lines 29 and 30. 

8. Page 274, column i, after line 6, insert Plan of Imperial Fisheries 

Institute. 

9. Ibid, line 12, read dog salmon. 



International Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. 57 

10. Ibid, strike out line 16. 

11. Ibid, strike out lines 20 and 21. 

12. Ibid, lines 29 and 30, for Chalcogramnes, read Chalcogrammus. 

13. Ibid, line 37, read silk dip nets and creaes. 

14. Ibid, line 38. for Jisuke, read Jusnkc. 

GROUP 123- 

15. Page 275, column i, line 28, for Tetsuji, read Katsuaki. 

16. Ibid, strike out exhibit No. 21. 

17. Ibid, column 2, after line 2, add the following exhibit: 

Kiyomoto, Kanekichi, Osaka — 
Cod liver oil. 

18. Ibid, line 5, read Top shells. 

19L Ibid, after line 9, insert Pearl buttons. 

20. Ibid, strike out lines 31-33. 

21. Page 276, column i, strike out exhibit No. 33. 

22. Ibid, line 33, read Funori. 

23. Ibid, line 38, for Suga, read Suwa. 

24. Ibid, column 2, line 5, read Canned Mackerel, Sardines and Sar- 

dines in Oil. 

25. Ibid, from line 38 to the end of this group, represent the exhibits 

of Yokohama Fish Oil Co., Kanagawa-ken. 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL ECONOMY. 

GROUP 139^ 

Page 279, the details of the exhibition of the Japan Red Cross 
Society as follows: 

1. Ambulance appliances. 

2. Table showing the development of Japan Red Cross 

Society. 

3. Table showing the growth of membership, its annual 

subscriptions and assets. 

4. Table showing the number of the staflF. 

5. Table showing the yearly number of membership. 



58 Japanese Exhibition, 

6. Hanging^ stretcher. 

7. Picture of Her Imperial Majesty, the Empress of Japan, 

and eight other pictures. 

8. Medals of membership. 

Q. Slides showing ambulance operations. 

10. Reports of the R. C. S. on the Japan-China war. 

IT. Uniforms of the relief staff. 



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